How teens and hipsters stain the resurgence of Vinyl


Vinyl artwork looks like framed Instagrams. No wonder the kids use them to decorate their dorm rooms. Vinyl covers are like the new posters.

“I have vinyls in my room but it’s more for decor, I don’t actually play them”

Note: She said ‘vinyls,’ the equivalent of saying something like ‘The Facebook.’

While records are meant to be played, vinyl enthusiast Liz Buckley also points out that at least these so-called hipsters are supporting music even if they never spin a record.

Music is an elastic medium — each format birthed its stigma. The iPod obviated the mini-disc, but MP3 files clogged the hard drive. Streams made music abundant but fungible. Tapes were an interim format, albeit they are still big in Japan. Meanwhile, CDs turned song names into unforgettable track numbers.

“It’s a sadness to me that the invention of the CD means I know far too many tracks by their number, not their name. “OK Computer‘s your favourite Radiohead album? Me too, me too. Bloody love track five.”

However, vinyl is the two-sided original. Its imperfections mirror the real and raw aesthetic of Instagram Stories and Snapchat that teens love today. Like an unopened vinyl, many of those social media posts go unopened — signal exceeds the noise.

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7 thoughts on “How teens and hipsters stain the resurgence of Vinyl

    1. Do you remember what you collected/played? My mom had old Beatles records that I never had a chance to spin. But the cover art was amazing…

  1. My daughter, when she was a teenager would go to flea markets and by records for the cover art and would hang them on her wall but serendipitously found amazing music when she actually played the vinyl. It gave her a appreciation for music she would have never otherwise heard. It’s like the kid who hates reading novel but loves reading comic books. What ever route is needed to get to the destination is aces in my book. 🙂

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