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An Olympian’s guide to managing stress

When you aim for the donut hole, you’ll certainly miss it. The obsession with victory backfires. Says Olympic biathlete Clare Egan on hitting the last of five targets:

“‘If I hit this, I’ll win the gold medal’ — as soon as you have that thought, you’re definitely going to miss it. That extra push or desire to win is not only not helpful, it’s counterproductive. You have to eliminate that from your mind and focus on the task.”

When you compete against others, you also impede your ability to get the job done. Says Egan:

“I think such a big part of this is focusing on what you are doing. You have to let go of how everyone else is doing, and focus on your own work.”

The lizard brain wants you to compete out of fear. The monkey mind wants to you to assay your inner monologue. Ambition trips you up.

The mental game is just as important as the physical one. Focusing on process rather than pursuit may give you a better chance at achieving victory.

Read How to Manage Stress Like an Olympic Biathlete

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Author: wells baum aka bombtune

A daily blogger who connects the dots between beats, culture, and technology.

5 thoughts on “An Olympian’s guide to managing stress”

  1. I completely agree. It is much better to focus on what you are doing and having fun instead of thinking about winning. If you perform your best, that is certainly a win even if you don’t place!

  2. This is great advice! I’m in the middle of a PhD and am bad for comparing myself to other students. If I focus on my research and the things I personally have to do and not others, I’ll enjoy my work a bit more I think and work a bit harder!

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