Advertisements

Van Gogh’s fascination with Japan

Van Gogh GIF-downsized_large.gif

Japanese art flooded Western Europe when in 1854, America forced Japan to open its borders to trade.

Some of the prints of Japanese woodcuts made it all the way to Vincent Van Gogh in Paris. He grew obsessed with ukyio-e, or “pictures of the world,” joyful elements he copied into his own art.

‘Seeing with Japanese eye’

Van Gogh amassed a collection of Japanese wood prints in his Paris studio. It was there he started emulating the bright and exotic images of Japanese art, an influence he called Japonaiserie.

“My studio’s quite tolerable, mainly because I’ve pinned a set of Japanese prints on the walls that I find very diverting. You know, those little female figures in gardens or on the shore, horsemen, flowers, gnarled thorn branches.

According to the exhibition of Van Gogh & Japan at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, the artist adopted the ‘bold, flat areas of color, bold contour lines, and prominent diagonals.’ He even cropped subjects at the edges of pictures and used the Japanese unique play on foreground/background spatial effects.

Van Gogh’s Japanese obsession permeated his work. “All my work is based to some extent on Japanese art,” he told his brother Theo.

vangoghmuseum-s0116V1962-3840
Courtesan (after Eisen) by Vincent van Gogh (1887)

Find out more about the Van Gogh’s love affair with Japan at the Exhibition Van Gogh & Japan.

Since you are here...

  1. Everyone should blog. Share your art by creating a site on WordPress. Read my tutorial on how to set up a blog for more. 

 2. Download the best FREE writing tool on the planet, Grammarly.  

3. Increase your productivity with scientifically optimized music to help you focus 

Disclaimer: If you click on any of the links above, I may get a commission from WordPressGrammarly, or Focus@Will respectively, which helps support all the expenses and work I do for this daily blog. 

Explore More Posts

Advertisements

Published by wells baum aka bombtune

A daily blogger who connects the dots between beats, culture, and technology.

Join the Conversation

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: