Category: Arts

Arts Photography

RIP Photographer Robert Frank, the “Manet of the new photography”

Robert Frank, one of the most prominent photographers of the 20th century, passed away at the age of 94.

He documented American society while on his cross country road trips in the 1950s, eventually publishing a 1958 black and white photobook The Americans.

“With that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film.”

Jack Kerouac

Writes the New York Times in his obituary:

“The Americans” challenged the presiding midcentury formula for photojournalism, defined by sharp, well-lighted, classically composed pictures, whether of the battlefront, the homespun American heartland or movie stars at leisure. Mr. Frank’s photographs — of lone individuals, teenage couples, groups at funerals and odd spoors of cultural life — were cinematic, immediate, off-kilter and grainy, like early television transmissions of the period. They would secure his place in photography’s pantheon. The cultural critic Janet Malcolm called him the “Manet of the new photography.”

Life & Philosophy Poetry

Manufacturing luck

gif via Cameo Nation

Trite but true: life isn’t fair.

Luck shuffles, unequally distributed, sometimes to those who are most undeserving.

But our situation is unique, a constriction that gives us a chance to add our own bit of intrigue.

What lens do we choose?

There’s no drug we can take to resolve the struggle. But the last thing we want is pity and boredom.

Misfortune helps rearrange our thinking.

The antifragile see the world anew, forcing the gut to churn out insights that the lucky couldn't even imagine.

We don’t always have to win the coin toss.