Is it better to be first or a fast second? 🤔


It doesn’t really matter whether you’re first or a fast second. It doesn’t even matter if you’re third or fourth or late to the game altogether.

What matters is maintenance.

If you build something, it is your responsibility to maintain it.

Google out invented Yahoo, Alta Vista, and Ask Jeeves. Now it’s on to powering search through AI.

Facebook, despite its current missteps, bought Instagram to ensure its social media hegemony.

Will Smith took his TV talents to the big screen. 

Whether you’re a business, athlete, or a celebrity, you can’t expect to thrive on the same platform forever.

It’s not so much what you can do right now. The central question is whether you can survive the variables. Are you antifragile enough to optimize on the next unexpected transformation?

Nothing is stagnant. How does on stay afloat? 

There is no evolution without some form of struggle. As a stoic would say, the obstacle is the way.

Jeff Bezos 1997 interview


Taped in June 1997, the founder of Amazon Jeff Bezos outlines his vision for his company’s music and books webstore model.

Flash forward 21 years later, and the company is not only corroding the retail sector by selling everything online, it also owns everything from grocery stores, newspapers, its own web services, to who know’s what next.

“Inventing and pioneering requires being misunderstood for long periods of time.” — Jeff Bezos

What’s your vision?

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Jeff Bezos in 1990

We, the data


Dissolved into data, we produce a feast of trackable interactions.

[easyazon_link identifier=”0553418815″ locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]They[/easyazon_link] are the editors as much as much we are the authors. While we create everything, they produce nothing, yet the internet still owns our words.

The attention merchants munch on the aggregate and peel off the niches into targeted prey.

Our eyeballs are the oil, primed, pumped, and then exhausted into tanks of consumption.

Monetization of the ego starts at birth, built for entertainment in the first place. We make, make, make until we are over-marked and sold to the highest bidder.

Tom Wolfe: ‘Logos are strictly a vanity industry’


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In 1972, Tom Wolfe criticized companies for creating logos for no other reason but to look modern:

The abstract total-design logo is the most marvelous fraud that the American graphic arts have ever perpetrated upon American business. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, these abstract logos, which a company (Chase Manhattan, Pan Am, Winston Sprocket, Kor Ban Chemical) is supposed to put on everything from memo pads to the side of its fifty-story building, make absolutely no impact–conscious or unconscious–upon its customers or the general public, except insofar as they create a feeling of vagueness and confusion….Yet millions continue to be poured into the design of them. Why? Because the conversion to a total-design abstract logo format somehow makes it possible for the head of the corporation to tell himself: “I’m modern, up-to-date, a man of the future. I’ve streamlined this old baby.” Why else would they have their companies pour $30,000, $50,000, $100,000 into the concoction of symbols that any student at Pratt could, and would gladly, give him for $125 plus a couple of lunches at the Trattoria, or even the Zum-Zum? The answer: if the fee doesn’t run into five figures, he doesn’t feel streamlined. Logos are strictly a vanity industry, and all who enter the industry should be merciless cynics if they wish to guarantee satisfaction.

To which Mark Wilson at FastCoDesign adds his two cents:

I can’t top Tom Wolfe–but I’d add just two more observations to his own:

1. Paying a Pratt student $35 to make a logo is. . .pretty much what Nike did to create the swoosh in 1971, the year before this criticism was printed. Wolfe surely would not have heard of the tiny Oregon shoe company yet, meaning his criticism was, at least partially, prophetic.

2. You could replace “logo” with almost any overrated trend and “business” with “the American people,” and this whole excerpt still sings. Try “fancy hamburger” or “wide leg pant.” Wolfe makes an almost algebraic argument in this passage that any product that one must rub their chin whilst critiquing is almost surely a fraud.

Of course, logos are ubiquitous. Branding is critical. We think in logos. We associate items with certain brands.

Businesses will hop at any chance to flash their latest logo on stationery, a building, football club jerseys, whatever, to impress. No siren nor Jumpman goes unnoticed.

Becoming Amazon-proof


Amazon buffets the shores of brick and mortar retailers. No business is Amazon-proof. No business is sacred in the internet-era.

We have to assume that everything we do today will at some point be replaced by something quicker, cheaper, and more personalized.

Dumping the problems on tomorrow will get us rekt.

How do we remain anti-fragile?

The first thing Darwin’s finches did was grow adaptive beaks. They survived by optimizing their behavior for the micro-market. Some formed specialized beaks just for eating seeds, other grubs, buds and fruit, and insects.

Specialization prolonged their survival.

Sure, the big companies have all the data. But their experience at harvesting attention often fails to attract the customer in search of a unique experience.

People want to consume things they talk about. And they don’t always want Starbucks.

Decisions are either ‘irreversible or reversible’


'Failure to experiment sufficiently', #quotes, ralph waldo emerson, experiment quotesSometimes your work is just going to be a 5 out of 10. It’s not worth scrutinizing every performance. The only ill is in hesitating, not starting what you think you should do.

Jeff Bezos has an interesting system for making decisions. He sees them as either irreversible or reversible. The simple heuristic pushed him to start Amazon, knowing that he could just go back to his old job if things didn’t work out. Writes the Farnam Street blog:

“Bezos considers 70% certainty to be the cut-off point where it is appropriate to make a decision. That means acting once we have 70% of the required information, instead of waiting longer. Making a decision at 70% certainty and then course-correcting is a lot more effective than waiting for 90% certainty.”

First we try, then we deduce

If the door swings both ways, why not give whatever we’re passionate about our best shot. The worst that can happen is that someone slams the door in our face or locks the other side. And that may be just the message that it’s time to pivot. They’re meant to astonish us, to jolt us out of our everyday thoughts:

We don’t need to collect all the information before we endeavor. We can reduce indecision by replacing it with the astonishment of doing. There is little reason to think in absolutes. Wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson: “All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.”

“All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” —Ralph Waldo EmersonClick To Tweet

Susan Ressler’s photographs document the absurd corporate life of the 1970s


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Diver © Susan Ressler (1979)

Photographer Susan Ressler released a collection of black and white images capturing the corporate culture of Los Angeles in the 1970s. From the clunky computers to the banal office plant and male-dominated executives, she captures the industrial economy perfectly.

Ressler writes on her website:

“[easyazon_link identifier=”1942084471″ locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]Executive Order[/easyazon_link]” depicts corporate America in the late 1970s, mostly in Los Angeles and the Mountain West. The sunbelt was exploding and so was corporate excess. Daylight Books is publishing this work in Spring 2018. Why 40 years later? Because now, in the era of Trump, we face the same dangers that ensue when corporations are deregulated and when profits “trump” people.


Her images are stark reminders of a culture that was and still is prevalent today.

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‘Everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance’


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gif by Matthew Butler

“Another flaw in human character is that everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance,” said [easyazon_link identifier=”038533348X” locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]Kurt Vonnegut[/easyazon_link].

Everybody’s wants to start something, but they rarely want to maintain it.

The problem in growing at no costs is that it blinds integrity. Instead of leading by example, the race to the bottom unearths the highest greed.

“The selfish reason to be ethical is that it attracts the other ethical people in the network.” Naval Ravikant

That’s the lesson of Facebook, the so-called ‘behavior modification empire.‘ The social network cut corners on data collection to make another buck. No Facebook, we will not answer any more questions “to help people get to know us.” Replace the word “people” with the [easyazon_link identifier=”0804170045″ locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]attention merchants[/easyazon_link].

The Cambridge Analytica scandal was the nudge Facebook needed to become more accountable. Seizing the data of others and building on top of it contorts the machinery of morality. Sometimes the genie of innovation has to contain the miraculous.

‘Don’t read the words. It’s bad enough that people use Powerpoint as a sort of teleprompter.’


Animation Presentation GIF by David Urbinati-source.gif

If you use Powerpoint, a few principles and tips to keep in mind when using type on a slide:

Don’t read the words. It’s bad enough that people use Powerpoint as a sort of teleprompter. Much worse that you don’t trust the audience enough to read what you wrote. If you want them to read the precise words, stand quietly until they do. If you want to paraphrase the words, that can work.

Big font, few words. And use pictures. Your narrative is the message.

Words on slides by Seth Godin

‘Blockchain represents the second era of the internet.’


52 Insights interviewed legendary business strategist and author Don Tapscott about the blockchain. Bitcoin is the archetype, kind of like how email was for the web.

His predictions are always worth listening to:

The blockchain is the second frontier of the Internet:

The way that we view it is that blockchain represents the second era of the internet. The first era for decades was the internet of information. Now we’re getting an internet of value. Where anything of value which including money, our identities, cultural assets like music, even a vote can be stored, managed, transacted and moved around in a secure private way.
And where trust is not achieved by an intermediary it’s achieved by collaborative cryptography through some clever code which is why Alex and I call it the trust protocol. Trust is native to the medium.

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Illustration by 52 insights

The blockchain benefits the stagnant middle class:

We do have a prosperity paradox today, that for the first time in history our economies are growing, but our prosperity is declining, we have growing wealth but a stagnant middle class, the only solution to this problem is the so-called redistribution of wealth taxing the rich and distributing the wealth.  We believe what blockchain enables is a redistribution of wealth that is through blockchain we can create a more of a democratic economy where we a priori distribute the wealth through peoples direct interaction with the economy.

Creatives will get their cake and eat it too:

We can ensure that creatives of value are more fairly compensated, so songwriters who have had their revenue destroyed by the internet can now post music on the blockchain and because of a smart contract your music is now protected by intellectual property rights. So those are just a handful of ways where we can create a more democratic economy in the first place.

The blockchain is future of the economic order where everyone owns their own virtual identity, all backed by ‘cryptographic proof.’ But will blockchain empower more equality or unfold into data exploitation as the FANG (Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon) have done to round one of the internet?

Cross your fingers. 🤞

Simon Sinek: Do little things


Consistency is a series of small efforts that over time add up to create a big impact. Seth Godin calls this ‘the drip.’ Simon Sinek refers to them as ‘the little things.’

Do small things. They add up.

Little things are the deeds one fulfills over a period of time. Whether it’s for love or business, good habits strengthen relationships and build trust.

It turns out that honesty and unselfishness are good for companies and good for life.

Sinek’s latest book Find Your Why: A Practical Guide for Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team came out last September.

How to Start Your Blog on WordPress With Bluehost in 3 Steps


Everyone should blog, whether you’re a business, influencer, hobbyist, or creative. There’s no reason not to, even if no one reads it. Blogs are tools for thinking and making stuff. They are also easy to set up.

I strongly recommend using WordPress over Tumblr, Weebly, Squarespace, or any of the other website builders.

Why WordPress?

 WordPress powers 31% of the internet while also giving you the tools to promote your work and stand out from the crowd.

If you’re looking to launch a blog with WordPress, I’ve outlined the three steps for you below! Keep in mind that you also get 51% off hosting ($7.99 $3.95/month) plus a  FREE domain name if you launch with Bluehost.

Getting Started With a WordPress Blog

1 – You’ll need to pick a domain nameThis is the fun part. Select a domain that represents your or your own unique brand identity. You can even get a .blog domain name like me. For your convenience, you can start your search by using the widget below.

2 – Select a dependable hosting provider. Your hosting provider is the backbone of your site. Fortunately, Bluehost offers a quick and easy one-click activation of WordPress so you can pick a theme and start blogging right away.

3 – Customize your blog’s content and appearance. The design is everything! After installing WordPress, you’ll want to customize the design of your site so it’s easy on the eyes. First and foremost, you’ll want the content in your posts to stand out. But you’ll also want to encourage your visitors to sign up to email lists, shop your products, or direct them to any other call to actions (affiliates, ads, best posts, etc.) in the sidebar widget area. There are a ton of awesome plugins you’ll want to explore, some of which are listed in the bottom of this blog post.

Next steps

If you sign up now, you’ll receive a special offer of shared hosting at $3.95/month for 36 months (that’s 51% off) plus a free domain name for a year! However, there are Plus and Prime plans as well should you want increased speeds and bandwidth.

Bluehost has everything you need to make a WordPress site that works for you. Have fun and get blogging!

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. PLEASE SEE THE DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.


The case for playing the long game


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Jeff Bezos in 1990

Good things take time. If we all settled for immediate results, there would be no Apple, Amazon, or Tesla.

The world’s best leaders are visionaries. They work years ahead, having planted the seeds for what’s happening now to springboard them into the future.

When asked what he thinks when analysts congratulate him on a good quarter, Jeff Bezos said:

“Those quarterly results were fully baked three years ago. Today I’m working on a quarter that will happen in 2020, not next quarter. Next quarter is done already and it’s probably been done for a couple years…If we have a good quarter it’s because of work we did 3, 4, 5 years ago. It’s not because we did a good job this quarter.”

So what type of futurists should we be, the tortoise or the hare, the fox or the hedgehog?

Get ready to go years being misunderstood.

Competence without imagination 🤖


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Photo by Wells Baum

The machine is a perfection of man, one that aggregates all simulations and chooses the best possibility at the right time. AI also gets smarter with each mistake it makes in a type of machine learning called reinforcement learning.

Humans can’t learn and execute actions as fast as their robot counterparts can. Our neuronal chips are already at brain capacity, no matter how many amphetamines we take to speed them up.

So what do we do when we’re rendered jobless?

For starters, we’ll have a bunch of time on our hands to do other stuff, constructing innovative things that robots can’t predict. After all, we’re the ones biologically wired to random thoughts, chaotic imaginations, and combinatorial creativity.