Category: Tech

Creativity Life & Philosophy Social Media

The only reassurance you need

We treat fame and social media status like currency. We presuppose that anonymity or a lack of engagement trivializes what we do.

Even worse, we let TV and Instagram determine our self-worth.

But what and who matters is rarely popular. No one wants to pull back the curtain and see the sweat and tears of a Van Gogh, who toiled in obscurity his entire living life. He never knew publicity.

Even if you've achieved some level of recognition, what you consider your best work will almost always contrast with the public perception.

At the end of the day, humans want to feel necessary. They want to commit themselves to a worthy discipline, whether's it's expressed through art or driving an Uber to support the art or vice versa.

It's a canard to think that fame predetermines whether you matter or not. The most important things in your life are provided by the most anonymous people.

Fame is fake stimuli. If you feel like your work matters, that's the only placebo you need.

Creativity Life & Philosophy Social Media

What matters isn’t always popular

What Matters Isn't Always Popular

If you've ever published anything on the web you know what it's like when all you hear are crickets. No likes, no comments, no reshares.

You think your content sucks because no one's acknowledging you. But it's a misconception to sell your work short, especially if it's your labor of love.

There are 2.1 billion+ people on the Internet. If you're writing, acting, or sharing your music someone's going to connect with you. They may be a fan, a teacher, or someone you admire within your scenius. But you're never going to appeal to everyone.

“The less reassurance we can give you the more important the work is.”

Seth Godin

All social media is based on reassurance. That's why most Instagram content looks the same. If you want to guarantee success, you'll share photos of beaches, dogs, selfies, and food.

“We were raised to do things that work.”

Seth Godin

But why not challenge sameness by trying something new? Go for some tension. Err on the side of being vulnerable if it means you get to make the stuff that makes you happy.

Unlike politics, creativity asks that you own up to being edgy, different. People that make change stand up and take responsibility for causing a ruckus.

“The internet could save your life because it'll keep you from a lifetime of being told what to do.”

Seth Godin

Choose yourself. The rest follows.

All quotes above are from Seth Godin's most recent presentation. Watch it below.

Culture Life & Philosophy Tech

Idleness is technology’s life-force

gif by Mr. Cody England

Flipping through apps like we used to surf through channels, expecting a variable reward but more often getting caught in a ludic loop

Getting hugged in a web of inspiration porn and motivational quotes without actually getting off the computer to do the work is insanity.

The paradox is staring at us right in the face: Having unfettered access to an entire web is a recipe for distraction. 

Contemplating off the grid is free — it's not a luxury. 

The optimistic expectancy that we can cut the cord and chase real life is a worthy endeavor. Most people can't resist pushing buttons on the nearest screen, snacking on a perpetual hit of chemical satisfaction. 

Like placating a nagging worry with good thoughts, we tend to technology as an instrument for coping with idleness. But we experience a virtual suck of life beforehand. 

The inability to do nothing empowers the light.

Culture Social Media Tech

Resisting the influence

gif by Rico Rose

The urge to do the exact opposite of what everyone is doing tingles the predictive soul.

To remain uninfluenced, resisting the harmonization of taste.

Everything interesting must be excruciatingly different — social media endeavors to trap uniqueness with templated styles.

The edited life is all chicanery, one stock cloud too many.

https://twitter.com/taylorlorenz/status/1166765075010482176?s=21

All places and poses scream with sameness, as do the viewers who stare at the screen cooking the mind for imitation.

Lemmings, are we not? Even the most-conscious person gets blindsided into a distraction of taste.

We are the perfect model.

Culture Tech

We used to pick up the phone

Tethered to the phone hanging on the wall, we forfeited our anonymity to the unknown stranger.

Every call felt like a cold call, with no indication of who was on the other line. Yet it felt surprisingly safe to answer even if it was a telemarketer. “No thanks, we’re eating dinner. Please call back later.” Hang up.

Now we expect every phone call to be preceded by a text, even if it’s our closest friends and family members. And we’re sure as hell never going to answer an unknown number because chances are it’s a Chinese spammer.

With screen time the default, if we’re going to answer the phone to take us away from whatever else we’re doing — emailing, texting, scrolling Instagram — there better be someone we know or think we know on the other line.

Creativity Life & Philosophy Tech

Where it sings

A mind running on the “factory setting” defaults to organizational distraction. Everydayness overtakes what was inherent fascination.

A mind surrendering to the television or the internet sits stuck in a ludic loop of changing the channels or flicking to the next app.

A mind in search of its stimulation stumbles upon daydreams and mind wandering.

The mysterious power of doing nothing intends to fill in the void. There is no lapse in creativity.

Boredom is where the synapses sing.