Newsletter: The ‘nudge’ theory and why planning backward is better than planning ahead

giphy (15).gif
via giphy

Hi all! This week’s focus is productivity. Below is a list of inspirational links to help us step outside the robot and think differently about our work habits. Plus, peep the new tune from Harlem based singer-songwriter Lynette Williams after the jump.

web gems

Pretending to be Batman helps kids stay on task. Good advice for adults and kids alike. The magic of acting like someone else helps us ignore the distractions that get in our way. “It is important to note that pretending to be another character had large effects on children’s perseverance.

The pleasure/happiness gap. We have two choices: the taking of short-term dopamine or the giving of long-term serotonin. We become what we choose.

Planning ahead is good, but planning backward is better. Start with the end-goal in in mind and then work backward. The key to goal-setting is to ‘imagine hypothetical goal achievement’ to create the feeling that you’re already making progress.

The flaws a Nobel Prize-winning economist wants you to know about yourself. The ‘nudge’ removes the barriers to decision-making by pre-selecting how one should save their money or what to eat.

Kazuo Ishiguro: how I wrote The Remains of the Day in four weeks. Nobel Prize-winning British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro talks about how he completed Remains of the Day in 4 weeks using a hack he called a ‘Crash.’

I would, for a four-week period, ruthlessly clear my diary and go on what we somewhat mysteriously called a “Crash”. During the Crash, I would do nothing but write from 9am to 10.30pm, Monday through Saturday.

Thought of the week

“I have no idea. People who boast about their IQ are losers.”

Stephen Hawking


musical vitamins

New track on loop

Lynette Williams – Light (2017)

Digging in the crates

Aim – The Girl Who Fell Through The Ice (2002)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

Advertisements

Low brain activities

via giphy 
  • TV
  • YouTube
  • Social media

People enjoy low brain activities because it gives them the option to unthink. Whether it’s movies or endless Instagram scrolling, the images are there telling us what to think.

Reading or listening to music, on the other hand, may take your mind places. As Ray Bradbury once put it, books create a ‘theater inside your head.’

When you pursue the answers out of passiveness, the mind takes a seat. Idleness is ok in moderation.

No one’s waiting for you to get off the couch and exercise your imagination. The door to exceptional wonder is open at all times.

Newsletter: ‘Reality is an Activity of the Most August Imagination’

Interior with a Man Writing on a Long Table.jpg
Interior with a Man Writing on a Long Table (Anonymous, French, 16th century)

Below are five links I think you’ll find interesting. As always, listen to a new tune and old gem after the jump.

web gems

Aziz Ansari has great advice for people in creative slumps. When he’s uninspired,  comedian Aziz Ansari does nothing at all: “I’m not gonna make stuff just for the sake of making stuff. I want to make stuff ’cause I’m inspired. Right now I don’t really feel inspired.” Should we force creativity? I think we know how Steven Pressfield would respond to this.

The Intuitive Thing: Ray Bradbury on the Arts. I love what Ray Bradbury said about books versus movies in this interview: “when you read…you’re creating it in your own theater inside your head. But a film is total realism. You can’t change it, it’s right there, there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Inside the husband-and-wife architecture duo’s sprawling Cape Town home. South African architect Gawie Fagan built his house in 1965 into the surrounding natural environment. At 91-years-old, he still lives there with his wife and still goes to the office every day.

“Our job is to imagine a better future, because if we can imagine it, we can create it. But it starts with that imagination.” Tim O’Reilly explains why we should avoid envisioning a dystopian society where robots wipe out humans.

10 Einstein Quotes to Fire Up Your Creativity. “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” The genius was on to something.


Thought of the week

“A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it’s not open.”

— Frank Zappa

New track on loop

Nathan Fake — REMAIN (Olga Wojciechowska Rework)

Digging in the crates

Erick Sermon – Music (2001)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

Newsletter: ‘The asshole problem’

giphy (6).gif
via Karo Rigaud

Below are some of the interesting links I stumbled upon this week. Peep a new tune and old classic after the jump.

web gems

This Stanford Professor Has a Theory on Why 2017 Is Filled With Jerks. Technology increases the asshole problem “because people are much more likely to be mean if they don’t have to make eye contact.” The worst part: it’s contagious.

Why We Fail and How. I love 16th-century French philosopher Michel de Montaigne’s concept of solitude in finding a “room behind a shop.”

“We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude. Here our ordinary conversation must be between us and ourselves, and so private that no outside association or communication can find a place.”

Keepers of the Secrets. No one knows what they want anymore because they depend on an algorithm to feed it to them. Thank goodness library archivists are still the element of surprise alive by giving you a box you don’t ask for. People “only want information based on the information they think they want. It’s important to look outside of your own existence.” We miss you John.

The Mask of Doom. He “wore the mask out of necessity.” Take a look back at Ta-Nehisi Coates’s piece on MF Doom from 2009.

Why We Sleep – how more sleep can save your life. “Scientists have discovered a revolutionary new treatment that makes you live longer.” That revolutionary new treatment is sleep. Even jellyfish get sluggish when they don’t get enough. 


Thought of the week

“Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.”

— Gertrude Stein, “Reflection on the Atomic Bomb” (1946)

New track on loop

Corbin (Spooky Black) – Ice Boy (2017)

Digging in the crates

Roots Manuva – Ital Visions (2001)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

Newsletter: ‘The internet is a propaganda machine.’

21765281_1942632102666521_3112093510364326830_n.jpg
Do you see a duck or a rabbit? Both 😉…?

Hi! I hope everyone is having a good week. Below are some of the links I recommend checking out this weekend. As always, peep a new tune and old classic after the jump.

web gems

Architects around the world are designing better schools. Buildings shape learning. Architects in Japan and Denmark are redesigning schools that permit more natural light and encourage the type of play children do at home.

The Stahl House Movie. Like watching The Office or seen Big Lebowski? My older brother wrote and filmed a mockumentary about icons & contemporary Los Angeles for his Sci-Arc thesis. Watch it, funny and brilliant.

99% Invisible: The Age of Algorithm. Algorithms are doing more harm than good. Facebook, Google, and Twitter all feed the internet silos with fake news. As Cathy O’Neil author of Weapons of Math Destruction puts it: “The internet is a propaganda machine.”


An Ad for London’s First Cafe Printed Circa 1652. In 1652, London’s St. Michael’s Alley became the first cafe in London to sell coffee: “THE Grain or Berry called Coffee, groweth upon little Trees, only in the Deserts of Arabia.”

+ As author Tom Standage points out in his book Writing on the Wall: Social Media – The First 2,000 Years, coffee houses were the original social networks and MOOCS where people mingled, studied, and exchanged ideas.

Smokers Are The Last Nice People Online. “Everyone on cigarette internet is so nice to each other.” Wish we could say the same about other web communities.

Thought of the week

“Three thousand photographs and three thousand doubts.”

— Teju Cole

New track on loop

Heat Wave – Nightmare (2017)

Digging in the crates

Mobb Deep – Reach (1996)

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

Newsletter: Have a friend “from every decade of life.” 👫

giphy (19)

Hi everyone, below is a list of links worth checking out this week. Listen to the new King Krule/Mount Kimbie collaboration after the jump.

web gems

  1. Once you pass the median age of 38, you’re considered ‘old.’ But people actually don’t start feeling old until their 60s. So how do you stay young? Have a friend “from every decade of life,” is what one 101-year old recommended.

  2. If you’re looking for a way to train your brain to think positive instead of negative, try to build yourself a positivity circuit: “spend one minute looking for positives, three times a day for forty five days.” Practice.

  3. Would you rather live in New York or LA? You can only choose one. Fun think piece from someone who’s dabbled in both cities: No, I’m from New York.

  4. Do you get goosebumps of a lump in the throat when listening to certain songs? If so, research shows that your brain might be unique.

  5. Here’s your moment of Zen, a calf trying to catch snowflakes with his tongue. #TGIF

Thought of the week

“He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.” — Nietzsche


New track on loop

Mount Kimbie – Blue Train Lines ft. King Krule

Digging in the crates

Slum Village – Reunion (2004)

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

Newsletter: The painted bat 🦇

The painted bat (BBC Earth)

Hi, all! Below are some interesting reads I collected throughout the week pertaining to arts & culture, philosophy & productivity, social media & tech. Peep the new tune from FYI Chris after the jump.

web gems

  1. “It’s human nature to want to prove that you’re right, but it’s rarely effective.” These are the skills you should learn that will pay off forever
  2. We usually think of art pieces like the Mona Lisa as original, a copy of one. But history shows that artists frequently made multiple versions, even Leonardo. “The idea of producing more than one version of a work is nothing new,” writes Matt Brown in his new book Everything You Know About Art is Wrong.
  3. TED distilled fourteen writing tips from an interview conducted with novelist Anne Lamott. Here’s the advice she’d give herself: “I’d teach my younger self to stare off into space more often. I would tell her to waste more paper. I would tell her she doesn’t need to stick to a decision; she can change her mind.”
  4.  A recent study shows that if you “accept life’s difficulties and one’s own negative feelings nonjudgmentally,” you’ll live a happier life. Own your state of mind; don’t be afraid of feeling bad!
  5. No longer a rare sight. The painted bat is back! So dope.🦇


Thought of the week

“Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God. It is so extraordinarily full of magic, and in tough times of my life I can listen to music and it makes such a difference.”

Kurt Vonnegut

New track on loop

FYI Chris – Home Alone

Digging in the crates

Mos Def – Umi Says

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

We’re rhythmic creatures

IMG_3474
gif by Wells Baum

We’re rhythmic creatures. There’s a reason we latch on to each other’s tastes and habits. Emulation begets automation.

But there’s always someone who comes along and challenges our beliefs, unlocking a Pandora’s box of attitudes and topics we never even considered. All of a sudden, everything we deemed to be true goes into question.

The echo chamber calls for cogs of sameness and lookalikes. Once we lose the urge to conform, we are free to rejoice in eccentric delight.

Kurt Vonnegut: ‘Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God.’

Kurt Vonnegut: 'Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God.'

“Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God. It is so extraordinarily full of magic, and in tough times of my life I can listen to music and it makes such a difference.”

Kurt Vonnegut

You can hear Kurt Vonnegut repeat this quote in the beginning of 1 Giant Leap track ‘Daphne’ below. You might feel a slight prickle the skin.

The internet could save your life

jj-ying-215319.jpg

The internet could save your life because it allows you to skip the process of being picked. Anyone can be an author, musician, photographer without waiting to partner up with a label or a distributor.

Standing out in a sea of DIY artists is the real challenge. Ryan Holiday argues that most people should not publish a book. But why not?

The internet encourages possibility and weirdness.

Your work, even if you’re a so-called ‘amafessional,’ is doing nothing to get in the way of die-hard professionals who make a living off their art. Just because your creations don’t belong in the Louvre shouldn’t hold you back from showing others what you made. The market generally favors the marketing budgets anyway.

Mediocrity never hurt anybody. If you really want to go pro, you’ll spend the extra time to improve and seek the feedback that makes you better. Everything good comes from practice, trial and error, allowing your creativity to pour and shimmer.

Remember, Van Gogh only sold one painting in his lifetime, and to his brother. With a leap of faith, casual work can turn into your most important work and stand the test of time.

John Lee Hooker ‘John Henry’

“For a long moment “John Henry” becomes a song about music. Hooker shoots out a reverberating RINNNGGG! in front of that old hammer, and soon people are coming from miles around to hear it, but then that too disappears. A gray, foggy rhythm floats over Hooker’s broken riffs and his tapping foot: nothing holds. The performance is so mesmerizingly abstract you’re not sure John Henry ever existed—not the man, but the song.”

‘John Henry’