Newsletter: The ‘nudge’ theory and why planning backward is better than planning ahead

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via giphy

Hi all! This week’s focus is productivity. Below is a list of inspirational links to help us step outside the robot and think differently about our work habits. Plus, peep the new tune from Harlem based singer-songwriter Lynette Williams after the jump.

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Pretending to be Batman helps kids stay on task. Good advice for adults and kids alike. The magic of acting like someone else helps us ignore the distractions that get in our way. “It is important to note that pretending to be another character had large effects on children’s perseverance.

The pleasure/happiness gap. We have two choices: the taking of short-term dopamine or the giving of long-term serotonin. We become what we choose.

Planning ahead is good, but planning backward is better. Start with the end-goal in in mind and then work backward. The key to goal-setting is to ‘imagine hypothetical goal achievement’ to create the feeling that you’re already making progress.

The flaws a Nobel Prize-winning economist wants you to know about yourself. The ‘nudge’ removes the barriers to decision-making by pre-selecting how one should save their money or what to eat.

Kazuo Ishiguro: how I wrote The Remains of the Day in four weeks. Nobel Prize-winning British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro talks about how he completed Remains of the Day in 4 weeks using a hack he called a ‘Crash.’

I would, for a four-week period, ruthlessly clear my diary and go on what we somewhat mysteriously called a “Crash”. During the Crash, I would do nothing but write from 9am to 10.30pm, Monday through Saturday.

Thought of the week

“I have no idea. People who boast about their IQ are losers.”

Stephen Hawking


musical vitamins

New track on loop

Lynette Williams – Light (2017)

Digging in the crates

Aim – The Girl Who Fell Through The Ice (2002)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

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Newsletter: ‘Reality is an Activity of the Most August Imagination’

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Interior with a Man Writing on a Long Table (Anonymous, French, 16th century)

Below are five links I think you’ll find interesting. As always, listen to a new tune and old gem after the jump.

web gems

Aziz Ansari has great advice for people in creative slumps. When he’s uninspired,  comedian Aziz Ansari does nothing at all: “I’m not gonna make stuff just for the sake of making stuff. I want to make stuff ’cause I’m inspired. Right now I don’t really feel inspired.” Should we force creativity? I think we know how Steven Pressfield would respond to this.

The Intuitive Thing: Ray Bradbury on the Arts. I love what Ray Bradbury said about books versus movies in this interview: “when you read…you’re creating it in your own theater inside your head. But a film is total realism. You can’t change it, it’s right there, there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Inside the husband-and-wife architecture duo’s sprawling Cape Town home. South African architect Gawie Fagan built his house in 1965 into the surrounding natural environment. At 91-years-old, he still lives there with his wife and still goes to the office every day.

“Our job is to imagine a better future, because if we can imagine it, we can create it. But it starts with that imagination.” Tim O’Reilly explains why we should avoid envisioning a dystopian society where robots wipe out humans.

10 Einstein Quotes to Fire Up Your Creativity. “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” The genius was on to something.


Thought of the week

“A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it’s not open.”

— Frank Zappa

New track on loop

Nathan Fake — REMAIN (Olga Wojciechowska Rework)

Digging in the crates

Erick Sermon – Music (2001)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: ‘The asshole problem’

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via Karo Rigaud

Below are some of the interesting links I stumbled upon this week. Peep a new tune and old classic after the jump.

web gems

This Stanford Professor Has a Theory on Why 2017 Is Filled With Jerks. Technology increases the asshole problem “because people are much more likely to be mean if they don’t have to make eye contact.” The worst part: it’s contagious.

Why We Fail and How. I love 16th-century French philosopher Michel de Montaigne’s concept of solitude in finding a “room behind a shop.”

“We must reserve a back shop all our own, entirely free, in which to establish our real liberty and our principal retreat and solitude. Here our ordinary conversation must be between us and ourselves, and so private that no outside association or communication can find a place.”

Keepers of the Secrets. No one knows what they want anymore because they depend on an algorithm to feed it to them. Thank goodness library archivists are still the element of surprise alive by giving you a box you don’t ask for. People “only want information based on the information they think they want. It’s important to look outside of your own existence.” We miss you John.

The Mask of Doom. He “wore the mask out of necessity.” Take a look back at Ta-Nehisi Coates’s piece on MF Doom from 2009.

Why We Sleep – how more sleep can save your life. “Scientists have discovered a revolutionary new treatment that makes you live longer.” That revolutionary new treatment is sleep. Even jellyfish get sluggish when they don’t get enough. 


Thought of the week

“Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.”

— Gertrude Stein, “Reflection on the Atomic Bomb” (1946)

New track on loop

Corbin (Spooky Black) – Ice Boy (2017)

Digging in the crates

Roots Manuva – Ital Visions (2001)

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: ‘The internet is a propaganda machine.’

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Do you see a duck or a rabbit? Both 😉…?

Hi! I hope everyone is having a good week. Below are some of the links I recommend checking out this weekend. As always, peep a new tune and old classic after the jump.

web gems

Architects around the world are designing better schools. Buildings shape learning. Architects in Japan and Denmark are redesigning schools that permit more natural light and encourage the type of play children do at home.

The Stahl House Movie. Like watching The Office or seen Big Lebowski? My older brother wrote and filmed a mockumentary about icons & contemporary Los Angeles for his Sci-Arc thesis. Watch it, funny and brilliant.

99% Invisible: The Age of Algorithm. Algorithms are doing more harm than good. Facebook, Google, and Twitter all feed the internet silos with fake news. As Cathy O’Neil author of Weapons of Math Destruction puts it: “The internet is a propaganda machine.”


An Ad for London’s First Cafe Printed Circa 1652. In 1652, London’s St. Michael’s Alley became the first cafe in London to sell coffee: “THE Grain or Berry called Coffee, groweth upon little Trees, only in the Deserts of Arabia.”

+ As author Tom Standage points out in his book Writing on the Wall: Social Media – The First 2,000 Years, coffee houses were the original social networks and MOOCS where people mingled, studied, and exchanged ideas.

Smokers Are The Last Nice People Online. “Everyone on cigarette internet is so nice to each other.” Wish we could say the same about other web communities.

Thought of the week

“Three thousand photographs and three thousand doubts.”

— Teju Cole

New track on loop

Heat Wave – Nightmare (2017)

Digging in the crates

Mobb Deep – Reach (1996)

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: Have a friend “from every decade of life.” 👫

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Hi everyone, below is a list of links worth checking out this week. Listen to the new King Krule/Mount Kimbie collaboration after the jump.

web gems

  1. Once you pass the median age of 38, you’re considered ‘old.’ But people actually don’t start feeling old until their 60s. So how do you stay young? Have a friend “from every decade of life,” is what one 101-year old recommended.

  2. If you’re looking for a way to train your brain to think positive instead of negative, try to build yourself a positivity circuit: “spend one minute looking for positives, three times a day for forty five days.” Practice.

  3. Would you rather live in New York or LA? You can only choose one. Fun think piece from someone who’s dabbled in both cities: No, I’m from New York.

  4. Do you get goosebumps of a lump in the throat when listening to certain songs? If so, research shows that your brain might be unique.

  5. Here’s your moment of Zen, a calf trying to catch snowflakes with his tongue. #TGIF

Thought of the week

“He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.” — Nietzsche


New track on loop

Mount Kimbie – Blue Train Lines ft. King Krule

Digging in the crates

Slum Village – Reunion (2004)

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: The painted bat 🦇

The painted bat (BBC Earth)

Hi, all! Below are some interesting reads I collected throughout the week pertaining to arts & culture, philosophy & productivity, social media & tech. Peep the new tune from FYI Chris after the jump.

web gems

  1. “It’s human nature to want to prove that you’re right, but it’s rarely effective.” These are the skills you should learn that will pay off forever
  2. We usually think of art pieces like the Mona Lisa as original, a copy of one. But history shows that artists frequently made multiple versions, even Leonardo. “The idea of producing more than one version of a work is nothing new,” writes Matt Brown in his new book Everything You Know About Art is Wrong.
  3. TED distilled fourteen writing tips from an interview conducted with novelist Anne Lamott. Here’s the advice she’d give herself: “I’d teach my younger self to stare off into space more often. I would tell her to waste more paper. I would tell her she doesn’t need to stick to a decision; she can change her mind.”
  4.  A recent study shows that if you “accept life’s difficulties and one’s own negative feelings nonjudgmentally,” you’ll live a happier life. Own your state of mind; don’t be afraid of feeling bad!
  5. No longer a rare sight. The painted bat is back! So dope.🦇


Thought of the week

“Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God. It is so extraordinarily full of magic, and in tough times of my life I can listen to music and it makes such a difference.”

Kurt Vonnegut

New track on loop

FYI Chris – Home Alone

Digging in the crates

Mos Def – Umi Says

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: Loving Vincent 🎨

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The beautiful train scene from Hayao Miyazaki’s ‘Spirited Away

Below are five links worth sharing this week. Listen to Pessimist’s new track ‘Glue’ and the 1979 track ‘Resurrection Los’ from Cameroon’s legendary Los Camaroes after the jump.

web gems

  1. It took six years of development and 125 painters to recreate Van Gogh’s brush strokes to make the world’s first oil painted feature film, Loving Vincent, which drops next month. Check out the trailer.

  2. James Holdman was one of the most prolific travelers of the 19th century. He was also blind, compelling himself to see through touch. Wrote one of his friends, “He had eyes in his mouth, eyes in his nose, eyes in his ears, and eyes in his mind, never blinking, but ready on all occasions to perform his services with remarkable precision and efficiency.” Read about The Blind Traveler.

  3. A good photo speaks for itself. But with the tiniest of tweaks using iPhoto or VSCO, it can be that much better. Kirk McElhearn explains why you should spend a few seconds editing your photos before you post them online.

  4. I put together a Twitter thread of my favorite John Peel quotes to celebrate the greatest rock DJ’s birthday this week. He would’ve been 78. Take a look back at his record collection.

  5. All the internet’s a stage. Agree or disagree?

Thought of the week

“15 years ago, the internet was an escape from the real world. Now, the real world is an escape from the internet.”

— Noah Smith


New track on loop

Pessimist – Glued

Digging in the crates

Los Camaroes – Resurrection Los

PS: I created a music club on Facebook. If you want to experience some new tunes and relive some greats, knock on the door!

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: What’s your favorite number?

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Painters suspended on the Brooklyn bridge, October 1914 (Eugene de Salignac)

Hi all, I hope everyone had a chance to check out the solar eclipse this week. I saw it at 81% totality from DC. Those lucky enough to experience the total eclipse will appreciate Annie Dillard’s essay below.

New music this week comes this way courtesy of Thundercat. Ry Cooder takes the crate.

web gems

  1. Autistic author Naoki Higashida provides a beautiful answer to the question: What’s your favorite number?

  2. In celebration of the solar eclipse, The Atlantic republished Annie Dillard’s epic piece on her encounter with a total eclipse in 1982. “We saw the wall of shadow coming, and screamed before it hit.”

  3. “When people look at my pictures I want them to feel the way they do when they want to read a line of a poem twice.” Robert Frank is best known for his 1958 book The Americans which featured 83 photos from Frank’s journey across the U.S. documenting race and material consumption in American life.

  4. Life coach David Cain provides an intriguing solution to avoid experiencing anxiety in advance: When You Can’t Stop Looking Ahead, Look Backwards

  5. If you want your food to taste better, take a picture.

Thought of the week

“Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life.”

— Marcus Aurelius


New track on loop

Thundercat – Jethro

Digging in the crates

Ry Cooder – Soy Luz y Sombra

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: Sometimes thinking is a bad idea

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gif via US National Archives

Below are your interesting reads in creativity, culture, and tech from this week. Listen to the new track ‘Endless’ from Mercury Prize-nominated Portico Quartet after the jump.

web gems

  1. “There are many different ways of getting from London to Paris, but as long as you get to Paris, that’s all that counts.” After running more than 2,300 auctions, Christie’s international director of auctioneering Hugh Edmeades explains What it feels like to conduct an auction.
  2. We are at our best when we’re relaxed and instinctive, free from the chaos of the monkey mind. Sometimes thinking is a bad idea.
  3. “I don’t just shoot willy-nilly, I wait for something to happen.” RIP Detroit street photographer Bill Rauhauser.
  4. Think of social networks as unique places, just as the bar and the coffee shop each contains its own set of memes and culture. In the Land of Internet Subcultures, Try Not to Look Like a Tourist
  5. Can a penguin go insane? Werner Herzog demonstrates the Nihilist Penguin.


Thought of the week

“We build our computer (systems) the way we build our cities: over time, without a plan, on top of ruins.”

— Ellen Ullman

New track on loop

Portico Quartet – Endless

Digging in the crates

The Defenders – Our Rights

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

Support my blog

Your support goes a long way: for every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

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Newsletter: We crave irreality

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via giphy

Give the drummer some! Below are some interesting reads in creativity, culture, and tech from this week. Listen to the track ‘Glue’ from Belfast-based electronica duo Bicep after the jump.

web gems

    1. The actor turned painter/sculptor, Jim Carrey, makes art as a form of catharsis in order to bring some color to his life. His work is impressive. As he puts it in the video, “artists make models of their inner life.” Watch Jim Carrey: I Need color.
    2. “Museums shouldn’t be trending! They should set trends,” says the former Met director Philippe de Montebello. Great read on How the Metropolitan Museum of Art Can Reclaim Its Glory in the age of cell phone screen irreality.
    3. “Analysts warned of several metric tons of dopamine and cortisol careening through the global economy.” This business piece made me laugh.
    4. The internet seems to be part of the air, ubiquitous and invisible. But what if you could get closer to the servers and cooling fans and take a listen? Explore What The Internet Sounds Like.
    5. Facebook is surveillance, and we give Big Brother the benefit of the doubt in selling our information to marketers in exchange for the ease of communication with so-called ‘friends.’ Thoughts?

https://wellsbaum.blog/2017/08/05/hooked-on-facebook/

Thought of the week

“Remember our rule of thumb: The more scared we are of a work or calling, the more sure we can be that we have to do it.” — Steven Pressfield, The War Of Art

New track on loop

Bicep – Glue

Digging in the crates

Bullion – Caroline, No

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)


This is my daily collection of interesting reads and new music. I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing them here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

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Newsletter: Take the stairs 👣

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via kirun

Happy Friday! Below are some of the interesting reads in creativity, culture, and tech I recently discovered. Composer Kara-Lis Coverdale ‘Grafts’ is this tune of the week.

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1. 105-year-old Japanese doctor Shigeaki Hinohara shared his six tips for a healthy life before he passed away in July.

‘6 tips for a healthy life’ (in summary):

  1. Retire late (very late)
  2. Watch your weight
  3. Have fun
  4. Share what you know
  5. Don’t worry about material possessions
  6. Take the stairs

2. Perhaps one of the biggest issues of our time is the ability to stay focused in the age of distraction. NPR’s Hidden Brain interviews computer scientist Cal Newport on the value of deep work.

3. Can we improve our craft over time? The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai(1760-1849) seemed to think so. Read his story about the importance of persistence. 🌊

4. External reflection is what philosopher and sociologist Charles Horton Cooley called ‘The Looking Glass Self’ theory. “I imagine your mind, and especially what your mind thinks about my mind, and what your mind thinks about what my mind thinks about your mind.” Watch Jason Silva break it down.

5. I’m reading 1984 even though today’s politics and culture – the fusion of controlled democracy combined with screen culture — seem to be more like Brave New World. Writes Shadi Hamid: “we are now condemned to live in exciting times.”

Thought of the week

“Hard choices, easy life. Easy choices, hard life.” — Jerzy Gregorek

New track on loop

Kara-Lis Coverdale – Grafts

Digging in the crates

Calibre – Manchester Nights

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)


This is my daily collection of interesting reads and new music. I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing them here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

Donate with PayPal

ORGANIC

Newsletter: Reality is too sober

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A floating cloud speaker

Below are some interesting reads I collected throughout the week about arts & culture, philosophy & productivity, social media & tech. Peep the new tune from Four Tet after the jump.

web gems

  1. “I wish I had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” The Top five regrets of the dying are essential lessons for those looking to reprioritize their life.

  2. We were in high spirits the night until we had to shed the release of toxins the morning after. To free ourselves from the grip of a hangover, we mourn like blues musicians, “The blues is played to get rid of the blues,” and then we poison ourselves all over again. Reality is too sober.

  3. How do we measure GDP when robots and AI take all the jobs? “The computers are not in the productivity statistics precisely because they are so powerful.” Productivity growth is irrelevant.

  4. How do we develop better intuition? Take a page from chemists. Keep tabs on the obvious and learn from other fields and disciplines. As scientist Robert Oppenheimer once put it: “Tea is where we explain to each other what we don’t understand.”

  5. Give the drummer some: Watch birds modify sticks and seedpods to make homemade drums. Their beats “could be a clue to understanding the evolution of music.”

New Track on loop

Four Tet Two  Thousand And Seventeen

Digging in the crates

Red Astaire – Love to Angie

Thought of the week

“Never trust the artist. Trust the tale.” – D. H. Lawrence

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)


This is my daily collection of interesting reads and new music. I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing them here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

Donate with PayPal

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Newsletter: The end of theory 🤔

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via giphy

Hi everyone, below is a list of links worth checking out this week.

web gems

  1. “Marketing is knowing how to communicate what’s special about what you’ve made to the right people.” In this video, author Ryan Holiday explains why artists should take responsibility for both making and marketing their own work. Creative side = business side.

  2. Red was considered the world’s “first color” — “the basic color of all ancient peoples” — before the 12th century writes historian Michel Pastoureau before the color blue gave it some competition. While blue initially represented a “hot” color, it came to represent pacification and peace after the 14th century.

    + Speaking of color consciousness, we celebrated #WorldEmojiDay this week. The Museum of Modern Art holds the original 176 emoji, designed by artist Shigetaka Kurita.

  3. “Over 40% of our creative ideas come when we give ourselves a break.” So give your brain some rest. Says Lin Manuel Miranda “A good idea doesn’t come when you’re doing a million things. The good idea comes in the moment of rest. It comes in the shower. It comes when you’re doodling or playing trains with your son. It’s when your mind is on the other side of things.”

  4. Check out this excellent piece from The Verge on how How Artsy finally convinced galleries to sell art online.

  5. “Stare at the world, not at your model,” warns MIT economics professor Arnold Kling in his review of Richard Bookstaber’s book The End of Theory“The world could be changing right now in ways that will blindside you down the road.” Buyer’s beware.

New Track on loop

Deep Summer (Burial Remix)

Digging in the crates

Barrington Levy ‎– Murderer (1984)

Thought of the week

“There’s a whole category of people who miss out by not allowing themselves to be weird enough.” — Alain de Botton

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)


This is my daily collection of interesting reads and new music. I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing them here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

Donate with PayPal

ORGANIC

Newsletter: Against conventional thinking

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Hi everyone, below is a list of links worth checking out this week. If you’d like to receive this email in your inbox, subscribe right here and never miss an issue.

web gems

  1. The above GIF represents 6 million years of human evolution. But the video is even more psychedelic. Watch it from the start.

  2. “Never look back unless you are planning to go that way. ”It was Henry David Thoreau’s 200th birthday this week. His work seems ever more relevant in the age of distraction and climate change deniers.

  3. “Every year that passes without extinction doubles the additional life expectancy.” That’s how economist Nassim Taleb describes the Lindy Effect which predicts the durability of books, restaurants, etc lasting years from now. Ryan Holiday details the art of longevity in his new book Perennial Seller: The Art of Making and Marketing Work that Lasts

  4. I shared this a while ago but it’s worth rereading in the Google Era: How the Humble Index Card Foresaw the Internet

  5. From marketing to making decisions, Vice-Chairman Rory Sutherland of Ogilvy gives us a lot to chew on in Things To Hang On Your Mental Mug Tree. Watch it with your favorite morning brew.

New Track on loop

Ross From Friends — Romeo Romeo

Digging in the crates

Twinkle Brothers – Faith Can Move Mountains (1983)

Thought of the week

“If you say the name Andrew over and over it turns into Duran Duran. Try it.” — Doug Copeland

Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend!

Wells Baum (@bombtune)

 


This is my daily collection of interesting reads and new music. I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing them here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

Donate with PayPal

ORGANIC

Newsletter: ‘Find the torture you’re comfortable with’

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Harper’s: July Edward Penfield (1866–1925): The MET

web gems

1

Why Do Anything? A Meditation on Procrastination

Procrastination is the purest form of idleness. Our brain’s neurons ultimately dictate what we decide to do. “Who you are depends on what your neurons are up to, moment by moment,” writes David Eagleman in his book The Brain: The Story of You.

We are stuck between thinking and action, for which we have little choice but to finish what we conjure up in our minds or actualize in real life. “The procrastinator is both contemplator and man of action, which is the worst thing to be, and which is tearing him apart.” Humanities professor and author Costica Bradatan explains why procrastination is more than doing nothing.

nytimes.com

2

From Ptolemy to GPS, the Brief History of Maps

One of the oldest surviving maps (the Babylonian Map of the World) is “about the size and shape of an early iPhone.” While maps continue to guide us, they also exploited to drive conquest, gentrification, taxes, and voting polls.also have always lied. To quote the author Mark Monmonier of How to Lie With Map, “No map entirely tells the truth. There’s always some distortion, some point of view.”

Smithsonianmag.com

3

How to Live With Critics (Whether You’re an Artist or the President)

Criticism is democratic, integral to an informed democracy. Argues literary critic and poet Adam Kirsch: “Everyone brings his or her own values and standards to the work of judging. This means that it is also, essentially, democratic. No canon of taste or critical authority can compel people to like what they don’t like.”

nytimes.com

4

Schedule Nothing

“We like lists because we don’t want to die,” said Italian novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco. But in the age of digital distraction, we make records of things we’ll simply never complete. This cartoon explains why.

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wellsbaum.blog

5

Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: ‘The End of Advertising’

“Devoid of advertising, television was elevated to arguably the world’s most relevant mass art form.” Former advertising executive Andrew Essex tells the story about the dual nature of today’s ads, following the example of Bayer which developed both aspirin and heroin in 1898.

nytimes.com

quote of the week

“Your blessing in life is when you find the torture you’re comfortable with.”

Jerry Seinfeld


digging in the crates

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  1. Laurence Guy – Wichita Falls
  2. Laurence Guy – Drum Is A Woman (feat. Steve Spacek)
  3. Rothadam – I Was Born To Be A Rebel
  4. Bruce – Before You Sleep
  5. Sudan Archives – Come Meh Way

LISTEN


I spend a lot of time digging the web for cool stuff and remixing it here. If you dig the blog, please consider making a donation or buying a book. A cup of coffee to helping out with hosting goes a long way.

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via giphy