Category: Psychology

Arts Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Psychology

Admitting that you’re lost

Whether you're stuck in a labyrinth or looping around the same racetrack, admitting you're frustrated and lost is at least a starting point. The hard part is developing a plan to do something about it.

If you want to go pro in any profession, you’re going to have to practice your beliefs and take calculated risks to gauge their rigidity. Doing the work removes the cobwebs of uncertainty.

Being lost is not an excuse to stand still unless something requires patience for results. Dance with the fear and see where it takes you.

And don't forget to stay loose in the process.

Productivity & Work Psychology

Confronting reality 👀

Goal setting is like game setting. You start at level 1 and graduate into unforeseen directions.

If you’re lucky, you’ll ping-pong forward, making leaps and bounds.

But more often than not, declaring your ambitions acts as a compass, guiding you with mere suggestions on how to proceed.

Like a magnet, the lighthouse tugs you into its sphere of safety. It confronts the fog with luminosity and compels one, at least temporarily, to play it safe. Resistance celebrates your inaction.

Stubborn, you move on to ride the waves of uncertainty.

Fear is good quality control. And experience puts bones in the goose.

The same way an athlete strengthens their body through bicep curls or a monk jogs the brain through meditation, one can practice grit.

The intelligent machine evolves to beat a chess master after learning from its own failed iterations. Wrongs accumulate until they drive the resilient foot-dragging laggard into right.

Anticipation, fear of the future — what turns the foot-dragging laggard into a resilient hammer is the extra push. And then move into the direction that feels right.

Effort investigates the self and paves the road of life with a bunch of guesses. Fortunately, those assumptions appear to get more accurate with time.

3, 2, 1. Action!

Psychology Social Media Tech

Hooked on artifice and spin

Twitter's removal of millions of fake accounts reminds us that not everything is what it seems. The internet is full of bots, replicating humans, even programmed to act more human than the humans themselves.

We too are conscious automata, no more authentic than the droids themselves. People are just savvy editors. We present our best selves online to increase our self-worth and to make other people envious.

Artifice defeats authenticity in all chess matches of the irreality we crave.

Yet, the push to be at our best could be the resolution to our proposed mediocrity. Why shoot ourselves down when a quasi-celebrity lifestyle sits at our fingertips.

Fame happens to the mobile holder. Stuck in a ludic loop, we are the host of our own Truman Show. Attention captured, republished, and released. We're neither superior to bots nor are we consciously behind.

Psychology Tech

Ludic loop

In his blog post on breaking phone addiction, Erik Barker uses a quote from NYU marketing and psychology professor Adam Antler to explain why we keep checking our phones again and again. The process is called a “ludic loop.” #gif #socialmediaaddiction
via Reddit

In his blog post on breaking phone addiction, Erik Barker uses a quote from NYU marketing and psychology professor Adam Antler to explain why we keep checking our phones again and again. The process is called a “ludic loop.”

The “ludic loop” is this idea that when you're engaged in an addictive experience, like playing slot machines, you get into this lulled state of tranquility where you just keep doing the thing over and over again. It just becomes the comfortable state for you. You don't stop until you're shaken out of that state by something.

So how we do we keep ourselves from going down the Facebook and Instagram rabbit hole? We employ a “stopping rule.”

It's a rule that says at this point it's time for me to stop. It breaks the reverie and makes you think of something else; it gets you outside of the space you've been in. The best thing to do is to use a declarative statement like, “I don't watch more than two episodes of a show in a row, that's just not who I am.”

As Barker points, you can also remove the dopamine hitting apps from your phone and replace them with something useful like the Kindle app to encourage more reading. And in the worst case scenario, you can throw your phone into the ocean, or just leave it in an inconvenient place to prevent the urge to take another futile gamble.

Arts Life & Philosophy Poetry Psychology

Have an exaggerated sense of curiosity

We’re all fake artists, winging it to chase our dreams while simultaneously masking our vulnerabilities.

It isn’t a thorny question of attribution. We all steal ideas from each other and recast them as our own.

But having an exaggerated sense of curiosity pays off. The cash value of policing thoughts means that we can better sew the past, present, and the future altogether.

We are one, in mind and spirit. The only drawback is fabricating the best self that meets the lofty ambitions of others.

Nothing is fake if the desire is real. All we can do is float into the canvass of our dreams.

art via giphy

Life & Philosophy Psychology

Doubt your fears

Depower them. Calm them with their own doubt.

Fears are the mind killer. They taunt the lizard brain into fight or flight. They thrive on ‘what if’ scenarios that haunt the imagination. There are no limits to what the mind can fabricate.

But the head is psychologically safe, physiologically sound.

Fright tries to wrestle with human insecurity and scratch away the varnish of bravery.

Can you endure the storm?

Fears are in their very nature abstract. Face them in their stark simplicity and they lose potency.