In the search of greatness

In the forthcoming documentary In Search of Greatness, director Gabe Polsky takes us through the athletic genius of athletes like Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, and Serena Williams to explain what sets them apart from the rest. Find out more on the documentary here. #sports #gif
via Reddit

Great athletes break the mold. They're not just gifted. They get creative in the arena, using their intuition and imagination to do things never seen before on stage. The same genius can be said for select actors, musicians, scientists, thinkers and the like.

In the fortchoming documentary In Search of Greatness, director Gabe Polsky takes us through the athletic genius of athletes like Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, and Serena Williams to explain what sets them apart from the rest. Find out more on the documentary here.


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Take The Ball, Pass The Ball: trailer for documentary on Barcelona’s Guardiola years

Watching FC Barcelona from 2008 to 2012 was like watching a performance art piece. The way coach and former Barcelona player Josep “Pep” Guardiola had the Blaugrana pass and move, with the added dynamics of Lionel Messi, Xavi, and Iniesta was just extraordinary.

“I don’t like it when a player says, ‘I like freedom; I want to play for myself.’ Because the player has to understand he is part of a team with 10 other players. If everyone wants to be a jazz musician, it will be chaos. They will not be a team, and nothing will be possible.”

Pep Guardiola

The team collected 14 trophies in four years, including the Treble of a La Liga title, Spanish Cup, and Champions League title in the 2008 – 2009 season. Hear the story straight from the players who lived it: Thierry Henry, Eto'o, Xavi, Iniesta, and more. Take the Ball, Pass the Ball. This documentary looks monumental.


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Nike’s new ad for Serena Williams will set you dreaming

Dream on…

Nike's new advertisement reveals home-video of a nine-year-old Serena Williams practicing tennis with her father.

If you don’t dare to try and chase your dreams, you'll rob yourself the joy of doing it. Don't just dream it.

Serena Williams

One day we’ll be able to turn our dreams into movies we can watch when we wake up.

PS. The man in the background is her Dad celebrating at the US Open.


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How to bowl a strike 🎳

Pro tip: No need to be a muscle man. Use the lighter ball to get down those extra pins.

By itself, bowling a strike isn’t all that hard. Most amateur bowlers end up doing it by accident at least once a game. What makes a great bowler is the ability to bowl a strike consistently, which comes from hours of practice, great technique, and a few insider tips to get you started.

First, don’t go for the heaviest ball imaginable. It’s uncomfortable and less effective. Heavy balls hit pins up and out of the way while lighter balls spend more of their time banging around, causing the type of havoc that results in a strike.

(via Art of Manliness)


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‘Most runners run because they want to live life to the fullest’

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Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you're going to while away the years, it's far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive than in a fog, and I believe running helps you do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that's the essence of running, and a metaphor for life—and for me, for writing as well. I believe many runners would agree.

Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running: A Memoir


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Designing the official World Cup ball

Every four years Adidas redesigns the official ball for the World Cup. This year's ball is called The Telstar 18, a perfect sphere that designed to reduce wobbling.

The Telstar 18, the design for the 2018 World Cup in Russia, is as close to a perfect sphere as you can get. It has subtle pimples and six thermally bonded panels designed to avoid knuckling, which is the characteristic bobbing and weaving movement when a ball is kicked without spin. All 32 teams have been able to play with it since November in preparation for the tournament, which runs from June 14 to July 15. But despite its similarities to the old ball, players have grumbled about the Telstar 18. Compared to the last few World Cup balls, the Telstar 18 is very similar to the ball used for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. It won’t fly quite as far down the pitch, and will wobble in the air a little differently, but aerodynamic testing suggests it will be more stable in the air overall.

Adidas tested the balls using wind tunnels, trying to mimic the unpredictable nature of a Ronaldo or Messi kick. Some say past designs weren't so sturdy and may have given some teams an advantage. The 2010 South Africa World Cup ball, known as the Jabulani, fit the short-passing style of the World Cup winners Spain.

Despite the ball's aerodynamic optimization, one thing is certain: the goalies always hate it.

I kind of feel sympathy for the players and especially the goalkeepers that have to get used to a new ball,” Goff says. So far the Telstar 18 has received criticism from a few goalkeepers that played with it starting in November, unhappy with how it moves in the air and the way the surface feels. Goalkeepers, unlike every other player on the pitch, have to predict where the ball will go in order to block it, while also not having the freedom to run around the field to adjust as the ball flies. That means goalies often have the most complaints about a new design. “Every time there’s a World Cup and a new ball the goalkeepers complain, because they’ve been given a new ball,” says Goff.

Read How the new World Cup ball was designed to not influence the games


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