Surfing a world-record 80 foot gigantic wave

Surfing a word-record 80 foot gigantic wave #nature
Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images

Nature always makes you feel small. Brazilian surfer Rodrigo Koxa surfed a record-setting 80-foot wave in November 2017 off the coast of Nazaré, Portugal. Just look at the lighthouse and onlookers in perspective to the surfer surrounded by the mountainous wave, or shall we say avalanche. Watch it for yourself.

Advertisements

Over and into the Rainbow Mountain in Peru

The Rainbow Mountain in Peru #travel #traveldestinations #peru
The Rainbow Mountain in Peru #travel #traveldestinations #peru
The Rainbow Mountain in Peru #travel #traveldestinations #peru

I visited Cusco, Peru nearly two years ago but somehow never heard of the Rainbow Mountains while I was there. These skittle-looking ranges also called Vinicunca, are a three-hour ride outside the Peruvian city. The red, yellow, purple, and greenish hues are a result of leftover mineral deposits from ice sheets that once filled the area. It looks like I'll have to make a second trip so I can hike this!

More info here.

Photos via Getty

Coron Palawan: The most beautiful island in the world

Coron Palawan: The most beautiful island in the world #travel #nature #ocean
Image via H.abanil

With a population of 51,803 people, Coron island in the Philippines is considered one of the most beautiful island in the world. And it looks like paradise. On a historical note, Japan used the island as a refueling base during World War II. 

Capture breathtaking images 📷


Anthony Bourdain’s tip for aspiring travelers

No Reservations: Around the World on an Empty Stomach (Amazon) was Bourdain's sixth book. In it, he offered this sage advice to ambitious world travelers.   

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves mark on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.”

Anthony Bourdain

The longest straight line you can walk without hitting the ocean

DbQ1-UAVwAEtLc9.jpg
straight-line.jpg
straight-line-projected.jpg

If you were the next Forest Gump and wanted to walk Earth in a straight line without hitting the water, here's your guide.

The path starts east in China and ends in Liberia.

Lace up those walking shoes, we've got a project for you. An intrepid cartographer has, with the help of Google Earth, tracked down the longest-possible straight land path on earth – and it starts in China.

Just start walking due west from Shitangzhen, a town south of Taizhou, in Zhejiang Province. Keep on moseying, and in about 589 miles you'll hit Wuhan. You will then, eventually, pass just south of Xi'an and (sooner or later) hit Qinghai. Getting tired yet?

After a brisk hike (i.e. crossing the Himalayas) you'll end up in Tajikistan. From there, it's just a quick poke through Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Israel, Egypt (right through the heart of Cairo!) Libya, Niger, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast and, finally, hit Liberia.

via Amazing Maps

Airbus Beluga XL 🐳👨‍✈️

Dl8i2EXX4AAihUe

Loving the whale-inspired design of the Airbus BelugaXL, due to launch in 2019.

According to the plane's official photographer on Twitter, the aircraft is currently on its 17th test flight.

You can read more about the plane's “whale-inspired eyes and enthusiastic grin” here.

Numb to the pleasure of patience

@rafaeldearaujo

You can't coax a train out of a tunnel. You have to be patient and wait it out behind the yellow line.

Perhaps the only thing we don't have to wait for is the next alert or push message. Writes author Michael Harris on how mobile connectivity intercepts our sense of time:

Our sense of time has always been warped by our technologies. Church bells segmented the day into intervals. Factory whistles ushered workers. But the current barrage of alerts and pings leaves us more warped than ever. I've been trained not just to expect disruption, but to demand it. Back in 1890, William James wrote in The Principles of Psychology that “our sense of time seems subject to the law of contrast.” No kidding.

He goes on to explain how technology resolves our impatience by numbing us “to the pleasure of patience.” We quell our anxiety with the rectangular glow so the late train no longer puts us on edge.

In chasing any goal, it behooves people to keep the patience. Things always take longer than we think but appear shorter in the telescope of perspective.

The train will eventually come and we'll hop on, prompting the nerves to jumpstart in anticipation of the next destination. As we grow nervous and impatient, the rectangular glow acts like a pacifier to allay our fears.

When we're moving along plugged-in at warp speed, we are no longer tracking time. Like a carrot, the clock dangles in front of our eyes, waiting for us to notice its blessings.

Vietnam’s Magical Golden Bridge 👐

Vietnam’s Magical Golden Bridge 👐

There are two hands at the Cau Vang (Golden Bridge) on the top of Da Nang’s Ba Na Hills, one to pick up the people, the other to hold the bridge together. 

Suspended nearly a mile high above sea level, the 500-foot long bridge was designed by TA Landscape Architecture in Ho Chi Minh City. Said one of its principal designer Vu Viet Anh, the Instagramable scene intends to look like “giant hands of Gods, pulling a strip of gold out of the land.”


Jimmy Chin teaches adventure photography


Vietnam’s Magical Golden Bridge 👐
Vietnam’s Magical Golden Bridge 👐

Push the limits of photography




High into the sky, giant hands, instruments for coping. See more about Vietnam’s Magical Golden Bridge in the video below. 

Images via Nguyen Huy Kham / Reuters

7 Teacups Waterfall at Patagonia, Chile

 

 

Talk about a dream place to swim.

Siete Tazas, or The Seven Teacups, is located 125 miles from Santiago, Chile. These natural rock pools stack on top of each other to create a sequence of beautiful waterfalls before emptying out into River Claro.

Add this to your travel list along with the stunning rainbow waterfall at Yosemite National Park.

Churches built in post-colonial India

jukgghhdln-1530281109

hzznjtjzmu-1529388478

svkzfmsgjh-1529387126

xyotyyyvto-1529386873

Vividly-coloured and shaped like stars, ships and castles, several churches in Kerala appear to defy one of the basic tenets of architecture as set by the influential American architect Louis Sullivan – “form follows function”.

Read Why are some Kerala churches shaped like stars, ships and castles?

Underground bicycle parking systems in Japan

The robotic system, called the Eco Cycle, stores bikes 36 feet underground. It can store 204 bikes at a time.

To use it, you need to attach a chip to the front wheel of your bike that links to your Eco Cycle parking account. When you pull up to the Eco Cycle, it will recognize you're a paying customer. Simply press the button and your will be taken underground.

Bikes are so ubiquitous in Japan that construction company Giken had to build an underground system to store them.

Read more

 

‘Human beings can aquire a certain solitude, even in the middle of New York City’

gif of new york on camera

Every thing in the world, every event, is like a dewdrop on a multidimentional spider's web, and every dewdrop contains the reflection of all the other dewdrops. But you see, the hermit finds this out through his solitide, and so also human beings can aquire a certain solitude, even in the middle of New York City. It's rather easier, as a matter of fact, to find solitude in New York City than it is in Des Moines, Iowa.

Alan Watts, The Wisdom of Insecurity: A Message for an Age of Anxiety