Categories
Psychology Science Video

What your thoughts look like

To be in your own thoughts — language, like headphones, delivers a sense of privacy.

Of course, no thinking is linear. Neurons are always crashing into each other, trying to connect and build new avenues of ideas. The whole of brain waves is greater than the sum of its parts.

Neurons that fire together, wire together

But knowledge presents a key constraint in the gobbling of information — it requires a dishwasher of synthesis to make even more sense of the apparent world.

What’s most dizzying is experiencing nothing. Whatever your neurons are up to this very moment determines what you do next.

Categories
Funny Nature Video

How to survive a plunge from a waterfall

You know when you’re going over a waterfall and there’s no way to avoid it? Life throws challenges at you.

That’s why this tutorial on diving from a waterfall — a real one, not the metaphor for life’s hurdles — will come handy.

Oddly enough, the figure in the how-to image looks exactly like Harrison Ford and this epic dive from The Fugitive.

Below is the classic scene I’m referencing. PS. If you’re curious about how to treat a black eye, check out this diagram.

How to survive a plunge from a waterfall
Categories
Science Video

The persistence of memory

What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.

Carl Sagan, from the Cosmos episode “The Persistence of Memory”
Categories
Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Video

How to practice effectively

How to practice effectively

Everything is practice. Practice is everything. “Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement.”

Biologically speaking, practice strengthens the neural tissue, specifically the fatty substance myelin which enhances the runway for brains to communicate effectively with the muscles.

The 10,000-hour rule of deliberate practice doesn’t necessarily guarantee improvement. The training needs to be effective. Below are four tips for ensuring that quality meets quantity.

Tips on how to practice effectively

1 — Focus on the task at hand. Minimize distractions like TV and social media. Put your smartphone on airplane mode or throw your phone into the ocean.

2 — Start out slowly and then increase the speed of repetition. Raising the pace builds up the likeliness of performing the task correctly.

3 — Practice frequently with allotted breaks. Professionals practice 50 – 60 hours per week.

4 — Practice in your brain by reinforcing the skill with your imagination.

Categories
Arts Video

Andy Warhol appears in the weirdest Super Bowl commercial ever

Eat Like Andy Super Bowl Whopper Commercial Image

Given the Super Bowl’s lackluster performance, I found some strange excitement in Burger King’s #EatlikeAndy ad taken from the 1982 film 66 Scenes from America.

The original clip shows Warhol chewing on a Whopper for a good four minutes. According to fast-food aficionado Bill Oakley, Warhold had originally requested a McDonald’s burger.

While you can’t always get what you want, “Art,” quipped Warhol—”is whatever you can get away with.” Watch the video below.

Categories
Productivity & Work Sports Video

In the search of greatness

Great athletes break the mold. They’re not just gifted. They get creative in the arena, using their intuition and imagination to do things never seen before on stage. The same genius can be said for select actors, musicians, scientists, thinkers and the like.

In the fortchoming documentary In Search of Greatness, director Gabe Polsky takes us through the athletic genius of athletes like Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, and Serena Williams to explain what sets them apart from the rest. Find out more on the documentary here.

Categories
Nature Video

Penguins turn to a life of crime

Penguins can be thieves. They can also be nihilists

Categories
Tech Video

The truth about algorithms

Mathematician Cathy O’Neil explains why algorithms are programmed and curated with bias. She is the author of Weapons of Math Destruction (Amazon) and runs ORCAA, an algorithmic auditing firm.

An algorithm is an opinion embedded in math.

Cathy O’Neil
Categories
Photography Video

Peculiar Pyongyang

A strange yet beautiful time-lapse tilt-shift look at Pyongyang, the capital city of North Korea. Such peculiarity can also be seen in the country’s late 20th century advertising

Categories
Photography Video

Wes Anderson vehicles

Video editor Jaume R. Lloret compiled some of the vehicles from Wes Anderson movies including The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and Grand Budapest Hotel.

What aesthetic eye candy!

Categories
Productivity & Work Video

Watch the trailer for Alex Honnold’s Free Solo

I’ve posted about the remarkable solo climber Alex Honnold before, detailing how he uses visualization techniques to train his mind to become immune to fear.

The folks at National Geographic and the producer of the 2015 film Meru (Amazon) Jimmy Chin have teamed up to document Honnold’s climb of El Capitan, the vertical granite rock formation located at Yosemite National Park.

“If you don’t have any fear to begin with, there’s a lot less to control.”

Alex Honnold

Said one of Honnold’s fellow climbers: “Free soloing El Cap is like doing an Olympic gold medal sporting event, where if you don’t get the gold medal, you die.”

A super-sensation seeker, Honnold literally dances with fear. As he says in the trailer, “If you’re pushing the edge, eventually you’ll find the edge.” 

The film Free Solo is out now in select theaters. Click here for more info.