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The customer purchase funnel, flipped

All marketers are liars. But so too are the customers who tell themselves stories to make them feel good about a product.

Nevertheless, there are times and moments where both sides benefit. For instance, Apple builds hardware and software that unleashes the creator.

The best brands meet their consumers somewhere in the middle, where sold objects are trustworthy, useful, and worth sharing. If the funnel starts open like a Sarlacc pit, companies should expect to be experienced but then ignored forever.

The idea is that you need a ton of website visitors, then some of them become become leads, and then after you do something (the usual recommendation is to bombard the leads with marketing automation) they relent and pay you money, thus becoming a “customer.” 

I hate this, because it’s shortsighted. Granted, if you work in a company that’s shortsighted (they’re racing to some sort of exit, or maybe living quarter to quarter), this funnel stuff is probably important. 

Ben Chestnut, Founder of Mailchimp

Read Why I hate funnels

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By Wells Baum

Wells Baum is a daily blogger who writes about Life & Arts. He's also the author of Discvr.blog and four books.