Herzog: “Don’t wait for the system to accept you.”

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“Don’t wait for the system to accept you. You create your own system, create your own [budget] and make your own first feature film or your first own documentary.”

Werner Herzog talks filmmaking, Pokemon Go, and how to manage our online life

via Daily Prompt: Apprentice

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Life on fast-forward

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The internet complicates what it means to be productive. We trap ourselves in email and unlimited social media browsing. We eat lunch at our desks to justify your busyness when “we should go for a walk, to the coffee shop, just to get away. Even Victorian factories had some kind of rest breaks,” says workplace psychologist Michael Guttridge.

Studies repeatedly show the dangers of multitasking and continuous partial attention. By doing more, we’re immersing ourselves less. More than five minutes of Twitter a day won’t make you any better of a Tweeter, observes Seth Godin. Fast-forwarding through movies, podcasts, and books won’t allow you to go deeper into the experience. More information just makes your brain fatter.

In a world of limited attention, it pays to be bored. The brain needs time to switch off, wander, and disconnect from the 24/7 neuron-inducing chemical factory. If everything is meaningful, nothing is worth doing.

Newsletter: Watch it while it lasts

web gems

        1. As Oscar Wilde said: “When bankers get together they talk about art. When artists get together, they talk about money.” When both artist and capitalist align, it yields the golden ages. For HBO, it was the novelistic storytelling of The Sopranos which boosted its bottom-line and pioneered the popular episodic format for Netflix and Amazon streaming services. As Nassim Taleb likes to say, “trial and error is freedom.” Furthermore, sex and cash can coexist.
        2. Instagram has 700 million users, 80% which are outside the United States. Unlike Twitter, the platform is still growing rapidly and enriching its addictiveness with popular features like Stories. Instagram is an essential app with a trajectory that looks a lot like Facebook.
        3. The Godfather of photography William Eggleston explains how he sees “great pictures” that most people miss and why “words and pictures are like two different animals.” He also cares less about Ansel Adams’s work.
        4. If you’ve ever driven around Los Angeles, you’ll notice the none of the architecture is consistent. Some of this is the work of architect Paul Williams, the so-called architect of Hollywood. who gave LA its eclectic touch. But he was often overlooked because he was African American. The Paul Williams Project is making sure he gets the credit he deserves.
        5. The barber paradox: Imagine that you live in a remote town in the Austrian Alps that only has one barber. You either shave yourself or go to the barber. So who shaves the barber? The British philosopher Bertrand Russell explained why language confounds meaning.
        6. “My favorite records sound the worst, because I’ve played them the most.” Indie-musician Damon Krukowski’s new book looks at the listening experience from analog to the digital world.
        7. This made me laugh: For the Love of God, Stop Putting Two Spaces After a Period I got used to one space because of the Twitter restrictions. Now I practice it everywhere, from work emails to blog posts.
        8. “All experience is no more than a form of “reliable hallucination,” a movie in the head with only tenuous relation to the outside world.” Our sleepy head makes better movies.
        9. Word to the wise: Don’t let social media use you. The ‘Americanitus’ driven by the fast paced digital world is getting worse. Plus, are you lost like me? .
        10. Watch Ray Hudson’s amazing commentary from Leo Messi’s game-winning goal in last Sunday’s El Clasico: “You can drop a tarantula into his shorts and he’ll still be cool.”
      • digging in the crates

        From the Nigerian archives comes the band Grotto’s lost 1977 gem, At Last, reissued by the Lago-based Odion Livingstone label. Odion Iruoje was a former A&R manager at EMI whom discovered the group and recorded their album.

        Listen to Grotto – Funk From Mother

      • Hector Plimmer is an electronic producer from South London. His latest record, Sunshine, is an exploration of trippy synths and jazz drums. “It represents (in no particular order) my musical journey over the past 4 or so years, some of which may never have seen the light of day,” says the musician.The opening track ‘Let’s Stay’ is a sublime mix of dreamy keys laced to a head-nodding drum kicks. It’s no surprise his influences range from Flying Lotus, Portishead, to Theo Parrish.

        Listen to Hector Plimmer – Let’s Stay

      • Slowthai is a rapper/producer from Northampton, England. His latest solo release slowitdown packs a serious punch of grime beats and lyrical jabs, most notably on the track ‘Wiseman’ which originally premiered on Boiler Room and played more recently on the Gilles Peterson show.Listen to Slowthai – Wiseman

 

Grotto – Funk From Mother

From the Nigerian archives comes the band Grotto’s lost 1977 gem, At Last, reissued by the Lago-based Odion Livingstone label. Odion Iruoje was a former A&R manager at EMI whom discovered the group and recorded their album.

Influenced by the likes of Jimi Hendrix and Carlos Santra, the group formed a rock/funk fusion band at St Gregory’s college in 1974. Recalls Odeon:

“I was into youth bands at the time, I felt they offered something fresh, most pros were into reggae which I hated (not as a genre but the aping of it).. youth bands allowed me to experiment, I gave them something and they in turn gave me something, which I could take to the next project. They made me in a way. EMI (Nigeria) did not really get the emergence of the youth market, they thought I was fooling around with kids.”

Check out the psychedelic jam ‘Funk From Mother.’

Images courtesy odionlivingstone

Slowthai – Wiseman

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Image courtesy the artist

Slowthai is a rapper/producer from Northampton, England. His latest solo release slowitdown packs a serious punch of grime beats and lyrical jabs, most notably on the track ‘Wiseman’ which originally premiered on Boiler Room and played more recently on the Gilles Peterson show.

Keep an eye on this emerging talent.

“no space no caps”

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Are You Lost In The World Like Me?

We reach for the phone to find ourselves. We’d rather outsource our frustration and boredom to a widget than deal with our anxieties directly.

The mobile phone makes it easier to cope (read: ignore) the world going on around us. It’s easy: we just don’t pay attention; plus, we can crush dissent with our own filters. But echo chambers confirm prejudice.

There’s chaos in the cosmos, disorder in peace. If we can’t tolerate ambiguity, then we’ll succumb to the fickleness of weather patterns.

Perhaps the lost are found, the only ones looking up.

Hector Plimmer – Let’s Stay

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Image courtesy the artist

Hector Plimmer is an electronic producer from South London. His latest record, Sunshine, is an exploration of trippy synths and jazz drums. “It represents (in no particular order) my musical journey over the past 4 or so years, some of which may never have seen the light of day,” says the musician.

The opening track ‘Let’s Stay’ is a sublime mix of dreamy keys laced to a head-nodding drum kicks. It’s no surprise his influences range from Flying Lotus, Portishead, to Theo Parrish.

Download the album on Amazon

Finding Vivian Maier

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gif via Fast Company

The 19th-century French novelist Gustave Flaubert once said to be “be regular and orderly in your life like a Bourgeois so that you may be violent and original in your work.”

Vivian Maier took this to heart. No one ever knew this nanny was an artist of her own.

She took over 100,000 photos, mostly street photographs of downtown Chicago, and kept them for her own viewing, including her selfies. Taking pictures was her happy place, a creative outlet, that allowed her to see the world with a third eye. She wrote with light.

Today, Maier would’ve been an Instagram and VSCO sensation. While she may have resisted social media given her inclination as a loner, she probably would’ve enjoyed connecting with others who shared the same passion. The internet unleashes the weirdness in all of us, motivating us to share our work.

Van Gogh only sold one piece of artwork in his life, to his brother. His posthumous reputation speaks for itself, as does Maier’s.

The history of braille

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Braille has its roots in the French army. In the early eighteenth century, a soldier named Charles Barbier de la Serre invented a code for military messages that could be read in the trenches at night without light; it used patterns of twelve raised dots to represent phonemes. The system was too complicated for the beleaguered soldiers to master, but when Barbier met Louis Braille, who had been blind since boyhood, the latter simplified the system into the six-dot version used ever since. Braille is not a language per se but rather a code by which other languages, from English to Japanese to Arabic…

Originally posted on wellsbaum.com

The barber paradox

Image via Nautilus

Imagine that you live in a remote town in the Austrian Alps that only has one barber. You either shave yourself or go to the barber. But who shaves the barber? The British philosopher Bertrand Russell coined the puzzle ‘the barber paradox.’

Language confounds meaning. In the case of contradiction, everything is true, and nothing is true. It’s a gray area with almost no answer but in the exponential.

“We die. That may be the meaning of life. But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives.”

Toni Morrison

Combines


Nothing goes to waste. It all cross-pollinates.

Picasso’s sculpture work bled into his paintings, as did his work in theater.

What we want to pursue are our interests, not what they should amount to. Seek a lifestyle rather than a categorization.

“Work as hard as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. Don’t think about what you want to be, but what you want to do!”

— Richard Feynman