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Books Psychology

‘Negative visualisation generates a vastly more dependable calm’

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Confronting the worst-case scenario saps it of much of its anxiety-inducing power. Happiness reached via positive thinking can be fleeting and brittle; negative visualisation generates a vastly more dependable calm.

OLIVER BURKEMANTHE ANTIDOTE: HAPPINESS FOR PEOPLE WHO CAN’T STAND POSITIVE THINKING
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Books

‘Even with an entire dictionary in one’s head, one eventually comes to the end of words’

“Every sentence is a wispy net, capturing a few flecks of meaning. The sun shines without vocabulary. The salmon has no name for the urge that drives it upstream. The newborn groping for the nipple knows hunger long before it knows a single word. Even with an entire dictionary in one’s head, one eventually comes to the end of words. Then what? Then drink deep like the baby, swim like the salmon, burn like any brief star.”

Scott Russell Sanders, Staying Put: Making a Home in a Restless World
Categories
Science Video

The persistence of memory

What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.

Carl Sagan, from the Cosmos episode “The Persistence of Memory”
Categories
Books

Mirrored Ceilings at Zhongshuge bookstores, China

Zhongshuge is a bookstore chain in China. Each of its stores leverages mirrors in its architectural design to give a kaleidoscope effect to the space’s interior.

The location in the city of Chongqing features a ceiling mirror that provides an optical illusion of intertwined staircases while also magnifying the size of the room.

Designed by architecture firm X+Living — these spaces are mind-boggling for readers and viewers alike. Can you imagine if JK Rowling wrote her next book in one of these inception-like wonders?

Zhongshuge bookstores
Categories
Writing

J.K. Rowling revisits her masterpiece

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J.K. Rowling reflects on annotating the first Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

I wrote the book … in snatched hours, in clattering cafés or in the dead of night … The story of how I wrote Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone is written invisibly on every page, legible only to me. Sixteen years after it was published, the memories are as vivid as ever as I turn these pages.”

J.K. Rowling

Most authors refuse to revisit their old work. Musicians avoid listening to their old albums. Some actors refuse to see their own movies after they hit theaters.

Art reminds creatives of their daily battles with the blank page, canvass, or script — a craft fraught with sweat and tears, pain and pleasure. Even more, all that work was yesterday’s genius.

“There’s always more to be said, more to be felt,” Henry James once remarked. We can always do better. Yet finishing and moving on is the point. And so we buckle up and start the next one.

art via giphy

Categories
Arts Books Photography

19th century algae prints by Anna Atkins

These algae prints were misattributed for more than a century before art historian Larry Schaaf discovered that they were the work of British botanist Anna Atkins.

As a pioneer of cyanotype photograms, a process in which sunlight (not a camera) imprints over objects on a piece of coated paper, Atkins produced the blueprints for a book entitled Manual of British Algæ in 1841. She just never got any credit.

Thanks to Larry Schaaf’s book of Atkins’s work, promptly titled Sun Gardens: Victorian Photogramsher work continues to see the light of day.

These algae prints were misattributed for more than a century before art historian Larry Schaaf discovered that they were the work of British botanist named Anna Atkins. #art #photography #science
These algae prints were misattributed for more than a century before art historian Larry Schaaf discovered that they were the work of British botanist named Anna Atkins. #art #photography #science
These algae prints were misattributed for more than a century before art historian Larry Schaaf discovered that they were the work of British botanist named Anna Atkins. #art #photography #science