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Arts Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Tech

Brian Eno: ‘Try not to get a job’

What would the world look like if everyone was guaranteed a basic income?

For musician Brian Eno, that society would put a lot more emphasis on time well spent.

“Try not to get a job. Try to leave yourself in a position where you do the things you want to do with your time and where you take maximum advantage of wherever your possibilities are.”

Brian Eno

Of course, not everyone can afford to remain jobless; the harsh reality is that work pays the bills and keeps us alive. But as more jobs get outsourced to robots and artificial intelligence, humans will need new ways to think about their responsibility.

What will we do when there’s no work to be done?

Work defines who we are. It forms the nucleus of our identity. However, a jobless world may encourage more innovative thinking about ourselves and our role in a secular, globalized world.  Perhaps it’ll compel some people to pursue more passionate work, the type of vocations that choose them instead of the other way around.

In such a world, we’ll be makers instead of cogs, thinkers instead of algorithmic lemmings. Writes Oliver Burkeman in The Antidote: “There is a positive correlation between the fear of death and the sense of unlived life.”

To work on something we actually enjoy is to live.

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Arts Creativity Productivity & Work

Beware the mind virus

Creativity dwindles with age. First, school sucks it out you and then corporate work puts the nail in the coffin. // Beware the mind virus #gif

Creativity dwindles with age. First, school sucks it out you and then corporate work puts the nail in the coffin. 

Patterns of normality and absolutes are leaches. Like a mind virus, they kill off organic reflexes whereas cultivating the imagination sings with possibilities. 

If you’re lucky, you’ll have no choice but to follow the siren song of vocation. If that’s an artist, great, if it’s a bank teller, ditto. Whatever calling comes your way, make the follow-up deliberate and worthy.  

Don’t let your ambition slip out of sight. 

“Try not to get a job. Try to leave yourself in a position where you do the things you want to do with your time and where you take maximum advantage of wherever your possibilities are.”

Brian Eno 

art by David Koblesky

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Creativity Life & Philosophy

Oblique Strategy: Turn it upside down

“Turn a seeming disadvantage to your advantage. The greater the seeming disadvantage, the greater the possible advantage.” 

Robert Fripp

via Brian Eno

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Cool Products Creativity

Prompt cards

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Brian Eno’s Oblique Strategies has been helping people defeat their creative block since the mid-1970s.

But Alain de Botton’s The School of Life is taking the concept a bit further and applying the deadlock to other life’s philosophies such as a career crisis, kindness, self-knowledge, calm and confidence.

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Arts Creativity Culture

“Musician, artist, thinker” Brian Eno talks Bitcoin, how ‘simplicity can produce complexity’, and more…

"Musician, artist, thinker" Brian Eno talks Bitcoin, creativity, and more...
Image via © Gabby Laurent/FT

The Financial Times sat down with “musician, artist, thinker” Brian Eno in the studio of his Notting Hill home. Here are my favorite snippets from the interview:

On the transactional value between art and bitcoin:

It is not so different from bitcoin. Art is the ultimate cryptocurrency. What the art world is doing is engineering the consensual value of something, very quickly. It only needs two people, a buyer and a seller.

On fusing music and art vocations:

I had this real struggle inside me, on whether to do music or art. I worried about it a lot. And then one day, I decided I didn’t have to do one or the other, I could do both. I glimpsed the possibility of making each one more like the other, a sort of fusing together.

On ‘how simplicity can produce complexity’:

When I first came up with the idea of utilitarian music, it was very, very unpopular. It meant muzak. It was music reduced, stripped of its fundamental cultural importance. And that was my biggest hurdle. Artists were supposed to want people’s 100 per cent attention.” What interested him instead was, “what was the least that I could do with music; how much could I leave out? What if I made music that was just like an atmosphere?

He criticizes pop musicians for being too close-minded, using the metaphor of a light bulb: “nobody looks at the bloody bulb. And that is what has been happening in music. We’ve been looking at the bulb.”

Eno illustrates the complexity from simplicity theory on paper by drawing out what it isn’t. He draw a pyramid and inserts lines from top to bottom:

This is God, or the Pope, or the orchestra conductor. And information flows this way only. There is no feedback, other than something dramatic like a revolution.

The symphony: it is inspired by the divine; it enters the composer’s head; he writes it down and passes it to the conductor, and then the leaders of the orchestra, then the section principals, and then down to the rank and file. There is this idea that the music is already in existence, in the mind of God or the composer, and it is our purpose to realise it.

Now, as a working musician, I know it doesn’t happen like that. I have seen a lot of music come into existence. It is a mess. It is a lot of complex things bouncing off each other, until suddenly something beautiful and intricate exists. It wasn’t in anybody’s mind. Nobody had conceived it up to that point.

“Musician, artist, thinker” Brian Eno talks Bitcoin, creativity, and more…
Image via © Gabby Laurent/FT

Pro tip: If you’re interested in more Brian Eno reads, peep the below: Brian Eno: ‘Try not to get a job’

On the left’s provincialism and the urge to speak out against the rise of nationalistic tribes:

“But now there is engagement with politics. I have so many American friends, they were so apolitical. Politics was something you never admitted to doing, like masturbation. But that has changed now. We all thought these [Trump and Brexit supporters] were this little bubble of weirdos. But we discovered that we were the ones in the little bubble.”

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Arts Books Poetry Productivity & Work Writing

The value of making up stuff

Art is what we do with our extra time. It is more leisure than life. “Art is everything you don’t have to do,” as Brian Eno put it.

The starving artist is compelled to have a day job. We can’t make art without the backbone of cash.

However, the cashless value of writing a poem, painting a picture, or photographing the trees could save your life.

It is in making up stuff we find meaning. The canvass enhances our lives, inspires us to express ourselves. That freedom can be liberating.

Writes Louis Menand in his latest New Yorker piece entitled Can Poetry Change Your Life?

“But I got the same painful pleasure out of writing prose that I did out of writing poetry—the pleasure of trying to put the right words in the right order. And I took away from my experience with poetry something else. I understood that the reason people write poems is the reason people write. They have something to say.”

Art translates life. It takes us places. We need stories and memes in order to keep the everyday exciting.

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Quotes

Everything else is stylization

Intelligence is really a kind of taste- taste in ideas.”- Susan SontagFailure is notan option (2).png

We don’t need art. We don’t need Instagram. We don’t need bottled water.

These are styles and preferences that enrich the satisfaction of our lives but aren’t things we need to live. They are products we consume when we don’t have to starve, which the vast bulk of people did before the 19th century Industrial Revolution.

We have to eat. We have to clothe ourselves and move.  Everything else: our food preference, type of clothes, and our favorite photography apps are all examples of stylization.

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Creativity Life & Philosophy

Choosing Comfort Over Impressions

As Brian Eno once said, “Art is everything you don’t have to do.” But ownership of fashion, fancy cars, and paintings are also artful things you don’t really need.

Comfort is the ability to live without having to impress others. It means going to work in a hoodie because you’ll be head down in code all day. It means owning a basic car that goes from A to Z or using Uber whenever/wherever you need to go. It means using Pinterest boards or your phone desktop to collect art. Living pragmatically like this saves you money and space.

Doing creative work is one thing. Owning it is another. There’s no need to dress up to other people’s standards if it doesn’t align with our own.

Express yourself. Don’t impress others. Just try to be you.

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Arts Creativity Quotes

Brian Eno on enthusiasm

“Everything good proceeds from enthusiasm.”

Brian Eno

The word enthusiasm translates to “the spirit of god within”.

Enthusiasm is the gas that keeps you going though CRAP (criticism, rejection, assholes, and pressure).

The enthusiastic are inherently confident but never satisfied enough to stop at the latest answer.

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Uncategorized

Tragicomedy

Life can be both funny and sad, particularly when you don’t plan on it working out either way.

You expect that by doing the work you’ll receive some success in return. But tragedy strikes, and all you can do is laugh at your bad luck.

Comedy is the bandaid that helps alleviate misery. How else can you cope with shitty times?

The irony of trying is that sometimes it makes things far worse than they already are. A lifetime could be spent getting over them.

The irony of giving up is that sometimes that’s the only way things work out. For some reason, losing interest attracts luck, which is equally remarkable and laughable.

Everything That Happens Will Happen Today.

Are life’s misfortunes funny or sad? Maybe it’s both.