‘The imperfect match, the failure of unity…’

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Mask CCV’ (2016) by John Stezaker © Courtesy TheApproach, London.jpeg

The great thing about collage is that, because production is so minimal, you are always close to the vantage point of the viewer. I am often asked why I don’t just get two people, pose them for photographs and splice the shots more accurately, but that misses the point. It’s the imperfect match, the failure of unity, that makes us identify with these beings.

When people say I’m not a real photographer, I tell them I work with the medium rather than in it. In the internet age, it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the producers and the consumers of images. I see my work as merging these two worlds.

John Stezaker, Old Masks

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Bending meaning with Max Ernst

Twists and turns, intended distortions, randomness and the irrational stitched into a collage.

Getting weird makes it more interesting. Becoming interested makes it less strange.

To protest reason is human. Thinking different frees one from the cage.

Max Ernst flirted beyond painting, incorporating bits of catalogs and photos to take them in ‘wonderful directions.’

Collage has been at the centre of artistic practice since the beginning of the twentieth century. In its simplest form, whether pasted, painted, assembled or constructed, the technique represented a radical restructuring of the pictorial tradition. Through Surrealism and Pop Art, it evolved from a marginal and purely synthetic process to become an intrinsic part of the modern aesthetic. Mixing and matching.
Collage has been at the centre of artistic practice since the beginning of the twentieth century. In its simplest form, whether pasted, painted, assembled or constructed, the technique represented a radical restructuring of the pictorial tradition. Through Surrealism and Pop Art, it evolved from a marginal and purely synthetic process to become an intrinsic part of the modern aesthetic. Mixing and matching.