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Productivity & Work Writing

Learning on multiple formats

Learning today is chaotic. There’s always a new app for note-taking, Smart pens, and the inspirational Moleskine.

To me, both digital and paper worlds are all one stream of productivity. I typically use pen and paper to brainstorm and mind map. I love the freedom of just quickly dumping thoughts on paper and then finding a web of connections between them.

Once I establish an understanding of the big picture I start to synthesize those ideas onto my computer where they get styled and formalized so that others can comprehend them.

I also love the feeling of feeling of crumpling up that piece of paper, assuming it’s loose leaf, and tossing it. Knowing that it’s permanently digitized is gratifying.


There are moments of course when time is running short and I’ll just snap a picture of my notes and import that image into Evernote. It always helps to see how visually I came to a solution anyway.

The best notebook is the one you have with you. As a rule of thumb, you should use whatever tool is closest: pen, paper, iPhone, PC.

As previously noted, I generally like to create a hands-on mess and then progress to clean it up in final digital format.

The 21st-century working process requires flexibility and skill in different formats which if you’re open to it make you more a versatile learner and doer.

Categories
Productivity & Work Tech

Denying the GPS

Rarely do we override the GPS because we know a better way.

We depend on technology to reveal answers 99% of the time.  We override technology 1% of the time, and even then we have our doubts.

The irony, of course, is that while technology makes our lives easier, we forfeit the chance to think and learn new things.  We know more than ever but we experience less.  

Experience puts the bones in the goose.  There’s no evolution without a beautiful struggle.

The computer is a second brain, threatening our primary neurons.  The machine is replacing the animal in all of us.

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How IBM’s Bob Bemer created the Escape key: Bemer invented the ESC key as way for programmers to switch from one kind of code to another. Later on, when computer codes were standardized (an effort in which Bemer played a leading role), ESC became a kind of “interrupt” button on the PC — a way to poke the computer and say, “Cut it out.”
How IBM’s Bob Bemer created the Escape key: Bemer invented the ESC key as way for programmers to switch from one kind of code to another. Later on, when computer codes were standardized (an effort in which Bemer played a leading role), ESC became a kind of “interrupt” button on the PC — a way to poke the computer and say, “Cut it out.”