Tag: diary

Uncategorized

Day One Web Pages

A diary means yes indeed. — Gertrude Stein

The diary is shifting from private to open because of the rise of social networks. People are more inclined to share what’s on their mind today in in order to prompt a response (comment, like, share) from their followers.

Day One makes the shift from private to public even more noticeable, allowing its users to set up profiles to share selected posts online. Day One wants to blur the lines of private and public like Twitter and Facebook have already done. Here’s a sample from my diary.

It’s not a bad thing for people to speak their minds. The reason I blog so openly like James Altucher and Seth Godin is to show people that I’m not afraid to think differently about things and provoke people to do the same. Honesty is the at the core of building up a dedicated fan base. You want to be proven wrong.

But you shouldn’t share everything. Some pieces must remain private. As Jon Mitchell writes on his own Day One page:

A perspective is only legible in the context of its native person. I moved the vast majority of my journaling back into private, and everything made sense again. I didn’t have to censor myself. The references no longer dangled. The meaning of each noun and verb still reverberated from the last time I used it. I was back on the road toward understanding anything. I figured that journaling had to be a private process to mean anything to me, and that the products of journaling, any insights or key turns of phrase I had, could be extracted and put into service to help others.

Writing is at first private, and then public. You write in private in order to liberate thoughts and opinions, and you share certain thoughts publicly to help others or to generate conversation. This is how lyrics from music artists establish intimacy with their fans.

I’m going to share these from time to time. When I do, I give these pages to the web. If you found this observation, or if you find a future one, I hope it means something to you. I hope it feels like an interaction with someone reading the same world story as you are.

Whoever said a diary had to remain private? As is everything in life, there’s a proper balance between a closed notebook and an open one.

“we can only connect the dots that we collect.” — Amanda Palmer

Travel

5 Things I Learned From Vacation

Photo Jan 01, 11 21 58 AM.jpg

We should go on vacation more often. Here’s why:

1. Break up the Routine

We should go on vacation primarily to relax but we should also go to step away from the monotony of the daily grind. Doing the same thing every day creates a life of boredom and automation. Stepping away allows you to reevaluate the things you do and ask yourself why you do them in the first place.

“Will you live to work or will you work to live?” — Roots Manuva

2. Examine Your Own Language

Take a vacation abroad if you can. By doing so, you’ll challenge yourself to a game of communication. You’ll realize that while English is the world’s language, millions of people still don’t speak it and you may have to use your hands. You also won’t have the luxury of Google Maps since you won’t have a 3G or 4G connection which means you’ll have to ask for directions face to face, with a real map. Google Translate won’t be there to save you either.

3. Embrace Different Cultures 

Frustration is a natural part of travel. No one speaks the same language and operates the same way. For sure, the one thing you can count on is the food being different.

The point of travel is to embrace the local culture and to note the things you like and dislike. You can’t possibly know what you like until you try to discover it all.

4. Escape the Internet

If you travel abroad, you certainly won’t have the luxury of ubiquitous Internet access like you do at home. This is a chance for you to rewire your brain and connect neurons instead of external bytes. You still need to use your own brain to think. You also need to look people in the eye and show emotion.

2015-01-01_11-26-37.JPG
Photo by Wells Baum

 

While going Internet-less can be frustrating at times because you want to instantly share the cool things you capture, it forces you to share only the things that matter. The more content you have to play with, the more you selective you can be in only sharing the worthiest highlights.

5. Enjoy More 

You have more time on vacation to do more stuff. You can drink more, sleep more, work out more, read more, learn more, and think more. You can catch up on side projects and explore your intuition.  You can free your mind from the stressful restraints of a schedule.

Vacation is a chance to freshen up and reprioritize the work that matters.  Most importantly, vacation gives us a chance to live life at random, as we once did when we were kids.

Uncategorized

It’s one thing to be banal, stupid, and idiotic on the inside. It’s another to have it captured in writing. When I started to write more systematically, I just couldn’t stand that bastard diarist-self, and I had to get rid of it. So I did, alone in my student apartment, page after page.

Karl Ove Knausgaard, on why be burnt his diaries to start his writing from scratch.
Uncategorized
fieldstudy: Today, we introduce Days, a visual diary for the iPhone that lets you capture each day of your life as it really is: sunny or dark, exciting or tedious, exceptional or mundane—and always unfiltered. Days is a product I am an incredibly proud of from a team I am lucky to work with. I could write for days (hehe) about what we’ve built. In the near future I’ll post some thoughts about the process, learnings I picked up along the way, and some of the cutting-room-floor stuff that we all like to get a peek at. But for now, I just want to express a feeling that is hard to put into words. This app feels like something much bigger than the some of our small team’s efforts. I had my hands in every corner of this app. I know it in and out. And yet I continually find myself surprised. It is thoughtfully conceived, well engineered, and carefully designed. But what gets to me are the unexpected moments of small but meaningful connectedness. It’s been something I’ve been chasing in my product design work and I can say, with humble confidence, that we’ve begun to touch that beautiful feeling.  Download Days It’ll be interesting to see how this does against my personal favorite diary app Day One, which focuses more on text entries but also enables photos. 
fieldstudy: Today, we introduce Days, a visual diary for the iPhone that lets you capture each day of your life as it really is: sunny or dark, exciting or tedious, exceptional or mundane—and always unfiltered. Days is a product I am an incredibly proud of from a team I am lucky to work with. I could write for days (hehe) about what we’ve built. In the near future I’ll post some thoughts about the process, learnings I picked up along the way, and some of the cutting-room-floor stuff that we all like to get a peek at. But for now, I just want to express a feeling that is hard to put into words. This app feels like something much bigger than the some of our small team’s efforts. I had my hands in every corner of this app. I know it in and out. And yet I continually find myself surprised. It is thoughtfully conceived, well engineered, and carefully designed. But what gets to me are the unexpected moments of small but meaningful connectedness. It’s been something I’ve been chasing in my product design work and I can say, with humble confidence, that we’ve begun to touch that beautiful feeling.  Download Days It’ll be interesting to see how this does against my personal favorite diary app Day One, which focuses more on text entries but also enables photos. 
Uncategorized

Dear Diary…

Diaries are no longer private. Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook posts have trained people into sharing thoughts, opinions, and personal images publicly.

People keep their diaries online.

It took a few years for people to get comfortable with digital sharing. Facebook became popular because it walled your content from the rest of the world. But then Twitter came along and trained everyone to become a mini-celebrity. All of a sudden people had a voice, a microphone, in less than 140 characters.

Now people can't stop sharing. They want people to like, comment, share, retweet, favorite, repin, heart, and reblog their content. They share more when no one responds and they're incentivized to share more when they do get a response.

The smartphone and Internect connectivity make capturing content just as easy as sharing it. You can snap a photo and publish it in three clicks/touches. You can just as easily keep this information private.

The challenge today is in knowing what information to keep to yourself. It could be an idea, a quick brain fart, or a to do list on Evernote or Day One. In a way, the practice of social sharing has increased the likeliness of private sharing.

Sharing is a mixture of self-promotion and selflessness. It publicizes your work and it helps inform others. Sharing with yourself, on the other hand, is more likely the act of discovering yourself.

“The benefit of keeping a diary is that it helps me figure out what the hell I’m doing with my time on earth.” – John Sundman, writer