Watch Volcano Calbuco Erupt in Chile 🌋

This is a timelapse of the Volcano Calbuco in Chile that erupted 3 times in 8 days between April 22–23, 2015.

One of the eruptions lasted 90 minutes, sending a plume of ash 6 miles into the sky.

While climate change deniers might point the finger at mother nature for these CO2 emissions, as one Facebooker notes in the comment section, “volcanic eruptions only make up about 1-2 % of the C02 emitted into the atmosphere. they also have a cooling effect on the climate from the Sulphur dioxide emitted.”

Setting sun

telescope science discover world

Whether you set the route or leave it open-ended, you can discover things along the way.

Constraints produce their own magic. They make you innovate based off what you have to play with. But so too do indefinite destinations.

Out of curiosity blooms everything.

The more we know, the more we want to know. We permit our heuristic temptations to guide the discovery process. The rush to fill ignorance with self-knowledge makes us feel alive.

The world is more like a playground than a camp. It begs us to take more information than we need. But in borrowing its widgets, we have to reciprocate to ensure what we put out or reinvent comes back to enrich nature itself.

Earth stripped of water

Life as we know it can survive without sunlight and oxygen: witness the creatures that populate the sulfurous vicinity of submarine hydrothermal vents. Life as we know it cannot live without water, and where there is water, there is almost always life.“I discovered living creatures in rain, which had stood but a few days in a new tub,” Antonie van Leeuwenhoek observed in 1675 after peering through his invention, a new and better microscope. A grown man like Pablo Valencia can last three weeks without food; without water, at most several days.

Read Watermarks: Diving into the fathoms to find life’s fluency

The Population Bomb

In 1968, Doctor Paul Ehrlich warned the world of its excessive population with his book entitled [easyazon_link identifier=”B001LD5GSG” locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]The Population Bomb[/easyazon_link].

“The battle to feed all of humanity is over,” he wrote, “hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death.”

His trip to an overcrowded Delhi in 1966 seemed to convince him that there wasn’t enough food to go around to support humanity.

Thankfully, Dr. Ehrlich’s warnings never panned out. Instead, his book sparked a debate about “the potential consequences of overpopulation: famine, pollution, social and ecological collapse.” Out came some viable solutions.

While population has more than doubled since [easyazon_link identifier=”B001LD5GSG” locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]The Population Boom[/easyazon_link] came out, agricultural innovation has been able to sustain the boom. Today, one in ten people are starving as opposed to one in four.

However, Ehrlich and other researchers predict that the environmental damage from overproduction remains to be seen. Undermining the ecosystem could still wipe us all out. Other researchers are more optimistic, believing that human ingenuity will come to the rescue.

We shape Earth. It shapes us.

26167560_942735665901482_315657857674587099_nWe shape the Earth, and it shapes us.

For all the pieces interact, transforming into a cohesive thought.

The trees grow in cities, the oceans meet at the cape.

All the pieces interact, enveloped by the space inside.

The weather is fickle, cyclical, everything too much for a remix, itching for evolution.

To get closer to the texture of stimuli, gentle in our convictions, cushioned from other things.

In nature’s ludicrous rhythm, we trust.

‘It looked like a Life Saver. It looked like a Life Saver up in the sky.’

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via giphy

Annie Dillard first published her essay ‘Total Eclipse’ in 1982. It’s since been republished The Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New. Below are a couple of my favorite snippets. Read the entire essay on The Atlantic.

On seeing the total solar eclipse, also known as the path of totality:

If you think very fast, you may have time to think, “Soon it will hit my brain.” You can feel the deadness race up your arm; you can feel the appalling, inhuman speed of your own blood. We saw the wall of shadow coming, and screamed before it hit.


On seeing a partial eclipse:

I had seen a partial eclipse in 1970. A partial eclipse is very interesting. It bears almost no relation to a total eclipse. Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him, or as flying in an airplane does to falling out of an airplane.

Are you excited to see the moon lurch between the sun and the Earth?

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The human shadow is a lack of light

Photo by Wells Baum

Humans rent Earth. It is for no lack of light we tend to do it harm, avoiding recycling and willingly spoiling the air with carbon emissions that heat up the seas.

We are buried in short-sightedness, unable to foresee the attrition of the very planet that is our terra firma.

Nature can only solve so many problems. The rest is self-inflicted.

Without a shock interruption, we’ll become the destructive tenants of our surroundings.

Photo by Wells Baum

Low Leaf – Psychlez

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Low Leaf is a singer and songwriter from Los Angeles. ‘Psychlez’ is her second single to drop from the self-released album Palm Psalms: A Light to Resolve All Darkness due out November 11.

The track launches with a soft piano and a mellow flute, before the singer’s soulful vocals make way to a drum beat. The overall experimental vibe of the album seems to match up with the artist’s earthy sensibilities. Her mastery of the electric harp is also fun to watch.

Learn more about Low Leaf in the video below.


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Wasting Tree Sweat

I see newspapers thrown into the recycling bin every day at Grand Central. At one point, the bin had a purpose and made perfect sense: ‘let’s save trees by putting tree sweat back into more newspaper production.’ It was the complete 360.

The newspaper recycling bin today is simply outdated and contradictory. Why would you force someone to save something that’s already been saved by the digitization of paper in a Kindle?

The recycling sign should tell newspaper readers to go digital, because you can’t kill trees that have been preventively saved. After all, trees create the oxygen we need to breathe. We could not exist as people and read as readers without trees.