Categories
Creativity Culture

Take the information you need and throw it away

In order to be creative, we need curiosity first. #amwriting #gif

There it was, knocking at the door of imagination and begging us to take it for a walk.

The mistake we all make is assuming we have all the information we already need. After all, Google spits up all the answers.

But just because every grade school has an art class doesn’t ensure that the students will be creative.

In order to be creative, we need curiosity first.

When we’re not chasing absolutes, grades, or even the pennies, raw interest accumulates on behalf of what’s alien.

gif via hellotrythis

Categories
Books photoJournal Productivity & Work

One page at a time

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Reading a book, preferably a physical one, is a good way to get your attention back.

The problem in reading on smartphones is distractibility. You’re a notification away from checking Instagram, email, or a text.

If you’re going to read on a digital device, make it a Kindle. Its lack of functionality — just try web browsing on it — is its best feature.

Reading is an escape from the endless buzz of the digital world. It builds focus. In today’s world, single-tasking is more important than ever.

Categories
Apps Arts Creativity Tech

Shake it up

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They say that it’s better to start something new when you’re young to avoid humiliation. As an adult, you’re not expected to learn new stuff: languages, sports, art, etc. Your skillsets are permanent. While that may be true, it doesn’t hurt to shake up the system to remind yourself that you’re still alive.

Think about how far you’d already come. You would’ve never thought you could pick up photography before the iPhone. Without music software like Garageband, you never thought you would’ve made music. Without Amazon Kindle author, you may have never been a publisher author. The list goes on.

Technology turned us all into foxes instead of hedgehogs. We might be amafessionals, but we’re far more capable of creative pursuits than before. It turns out all we needed was a widget, the Internet’s connectedness, and a little bit of curiosity.

We’ve been conditioned to avoid error and taught to keep doing what we’re good at. But learning to do more stuff keep things more interesting.

Categories
Life & Philosophy

Talking out loud

They say the best way to learn something is to teach it to others.

They say one of best ways to talk to yourself is to talk to another person.

Knowledge is social. Identity is social. What you put out, what you share is what you should expect back in return, quid pro quo.

The knowledgeable person talks out loud but carries a meek stick.

Categories
Arts Creativity Culture Quotes

Susan Sontag on taste

Intelligence is really a kind of taste- taste in ideas.”- Susan SontagFailure is notan option.png

“For taste governs every free — as opposed to rote — human response. Nothing is more decisive. There is taste in people, visual taste, taste in emotion – and there is taste in acts, taste in morality. Intelligence, as well, is really a kind of taste: taste in ideas.”

— Susan Sontag

From the essay “Notes on Camp,” available in Against Interpretation: And Other Essays (1964)

Categories
Culture

How was your day?

If you ask someone how they’re doing, they’ll usually provide a short answer like “well, thanks,” even if they’re having a bad day. No one wants to go into detail about their present state because of the length of time it would require to explain all the details. The truth may sound something like “I was late to work because the kid got sick, and then someone nicked my car.”

If you ask someone about their day when they come home from work or school, you can expect the same desultory answer most of the time such as “It was ok. Same old. The usual. You know…” Even the asking can be just as routine as the answer. You could probably get a better glimpse of your kid’s day by looking at their Snapchat or Instagram.

For some parents, however, asking the common question can be a substitute for as Lisa Damour at the New York Times puts it, “I love you and miss you and would like to touch base.” Damour suggests asking your teen something more particular like status on a group project or basketball practice.

If you’re going to ask either how someone is doing or how their day was and it’s meant to be more than small talk, the interrogator’s genuine interest, the tone of voice, and specificity is just as likely to produce an honest answer. Both ways can mean it. The truth is never banal.