Tag: focus

Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Writing

Relaxed while working

The synchronicities tend to happen in our most relaxed moments, not when we’re stressing out about work or life.

Bothersome thoughts place a block on our ability to connect disparate ideas.

Unmoored from the monkey mind, we grant the synapses a passport to freedom.

In a state of flow, nothing is wanting. The pen can hardly keep up with the bicycle of impressions peddling through our heads.

Awake on our passions, always working to a place where we catch onto to things.

Apps Books Tech

Have you forgotten how to read books?

learning how to read books

We need to relearn how to read books in the digital age. Online reading is a different experience than physical print.

For one, the digital experience is stickier because of its dopamine-hitting bells and whistles. We are constantly shifting between articles, apps, and text messages, hijacked by the latest gaze of entertainment. It's the equivalent of flipping TV channels.

Writes Canadian author and journalist Michael Harris:

“Online life makes me into a different kind of reader – a cynical one. I scrounge, now, for the useful fact; I zero in on the shareable link. My attention – and thus my experience – fractures. Online reading is about clicks, and comments, and points. When I take that mindset and try to apply it to a beaten-up paperback, my mind bucks.”

Since physical books lack the immediate stimuli, reading requires an entirely different mindset. It enforces focus and patience. Said Harris: “I do think old, book-oriented styles of reading opened the world to me – by closing it. And new, screen-oriented styles of reading seem to have the opposite effect: They close the world to me, by opening it.”

Screens are for short-term readers; book heads play the long-game. The latter know that great moments in novels are as scarce a goal in a soccer game, but they can also be more exciting.

Books test our attentiveness while creating anticipation. Perhaps they are the only escape we have left from our distracted world. Constricted to one tangible novel of a screen, a paperback can help recalibrate the imagination and slow down time.


Photography Uncategorized

Rediscover this day: The Grand Central Astronaut

Photo by Wells Baum

One of my favorite features on Google Photos is ‘Rediscover This Day.' It'll crawl through your image library and collate a series of images from the same day years ago.

The feature isn't new; Timehop popularized the retrospective social media feature years ago. However, Facebook and Google Photos were able to scale it.

So what does this have to do with the astronaut?

I snapped this image two years ago but forgot about it. Remember what Om Malik said: “We take too many photos and little time looking at them.” Two years in the smartphone era is like a decade!

What I enjoy about this picture other than the rarity of seeing an astronaut in Grand Central Station is the black and white contrast which makes the spaceman the center of attention. The crowd is noticeable but almost out of focus. The original color version doesn't have the same noticeable impact.

Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Social Media Tech

Life on fast-forward

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The internet complicates what it means to be productive. We trap ourselves in email and unlimited social media browsing. We eat lunch at our desks to justify your busyness when “we should go for a walk, to the coffee shop, just to get away. Even Victorian factories had some kind of rest breaks,” says workplace psychologist Michael Guttridge.

Studies repeatedly show the dangers of multitasking and continuous partial attention. By doing more, we’re immersing ourselves less.

More than five minutes of Twitter a day won’t make you any better of a Tweeter, observes Seth Godin. Fast-forwarding through movies, podcasts, and books won’t allow you to go deeper into the experience. More information just makes your brain fatter.

In a world of limited attention, it pays to be bored. The brain needs time to switch off, wander, and disconnect from the 24/7 neuron-inducing chemical factory. If everything is meaningful, nothing is worth doing.

Arts Life & Philosophy

Habituate the fear 

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Anxiety is both a contagious and fearful gift. However, more emphasis gets placed on its negative influence rather than its impetus for greatness

By overcompensating for our fears, rehearsing actions that vitiate it, we preempt the tremors with the feeling of habit.

Making art is an anxiety reducer, as is doing the dishes, running, or putting away vinyl. Whatever gets us out of our heads and into a flow state brings relief.

“Habits are more important than fears.”

Seth Godin

Books photoJournal Productivity & Work

One page at a time

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Reading a book, preferably a physical one, is a good way to get your attention back.

The problem in reading on smartphones is distractibility. You're a notification away from checking Instagram, email, or a text.

If you're going to read on a digital device, make it a Kindle. Its lack of functionality — just try web browsing on it — is its best feature.

Reading is an escape from the endless buzz of the digital world. It builds focus. In today's world, single-tasking is more important than ever.