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Life & Philosophy Politics & Society

Progress vs acceptance 

anthony-delanoix-22776

What if instead of trying to get better, we improved upon the things that already existed?

We can become so obsessed with progress that we lose the fundamentals of what made things great in the first place.

Yes, living up to ideals is hard. But you accept the rules laid out in front of you, and then you try your hardest to live up to them.

Acceptance is the cornerstone of progress. The rest of the time is spent strengthening the system to ensure your actions line up to the intended beliefs.

The fixation with progress threatens what’s ideal. It’s moody and tempted toward nihilism. There’s no need to change what’s good if everything was right in the first place.

Cynicism is the easiest way to cop out. Even the pessimist doesn’t let things fall apart.

“The law of progress holds that everything now must be better than what was there before. Don’t you see if you want something better, and better, and better, you lose the good. The good is no longer even being measured.” — Hannah Arendt

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Uncategorized

Trial and error is freedom.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb
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Uncategorized

Live. Work. Play.

We can enjoy all three. But work is the catalyst for life and play. We need money to enjoy these freedoms.

When we work more, we get paid more. Getting richer promises to increase our happiness. However, more money often leaves us with less time for life and play.

The objective therefore is to find work that combines life and play. The ideal lifestyle consists of a healthy balance of all three.

Do you live to work or do you work to live? We shouldn’t be able to know the difference. Now is the time to play…

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Uncategorized

The price of being a sheep is boredom. The price of being a wolf is loneliness. Choose one or the other with great care.

Hugh Macleod
Categories
Culture

The elevator paradox

Practically every elevator has a camera yet everybody still messes around.

People do things on elevators they wouldn’t ordinarily do in public, such as picking their nose or smooching aggressively. Every action goes on record.

What is it about elevators that makes one feel private while acknowledging Orwellian presence?

My only guess is that elevators feel like traps. Because people can’t go anywhere and know they’re being watched anyway they do whatever they want.

Instead of installing discipline, elevator cameras ignite rebelliousness. People show similar insouciance to the NSA’s invasion of online privacy. The fear of being watched just compels users to fight the system and act with no restraints.

Most people just want to get on with the business of living. They’ll tug back when Big Brother encroaches. Like any animal, the smaller the cage the bigger the desire for absolute freedom.

Leave us alone and let us be or don’t; we’ll act freely anyway.

art via giphy