Categories
Apps Tech

Google Maps streamlines look and adds hotspots

Let’s face it. Google Maps is bloated. It’s like the MySpace of maps with a bunch of different custom options and toolbars.

But Google released an update yesterday that promises to declutter its design.

“So as part of this update, we’ve removed elements that aren’t absolutely required (like road outlines).”

Google also added a new feature to spotlight potential “areas of interest.” If there’s anything we learned from Pokemon Go, it’s that people want to explore new places.

“As you explore the new map, you’ll notice areas shaded in orange representing “areas of interest”—places where there’s a lot of activities and things to do.”

Maps are essential to our mobile experience. Without GPS, we’d be lost. While Apple’s Maps app has improved, Google still has more location-based data, something Foursquare is also optimistic about.

Categories
Uncategorized

Asking for Directions

No one asks for directions anymore, nor do they use an external GPS. They just navigate to their destination using the Google Maps app with GPS pre-installed.

The impact is two-fold:

  1. People don’t need maps, nor do they need to know how to read one. They just listen to the machine and depend on it to tell them where to go.
  2. The locals, even the manager at the gas station, feels a bit lonelier. We used to use them as guideposts, and they used us to gauge interest in their community.

When technology replaces old maps and people we lose the chance to problem solve and interact. We never get a chance to learn from our mistakes or be misled, impeding our brain’s ability to form new connections and strengthen our instincts.

Outsourcing the human mind to machines is supposed to free up time so we can move on to do bigger and more important things. But it’s only making us lazier.

Elon Musk has already started making the the first self-driving car to be available in three years. Once we go on autopilot we risk losing our faculty of mind.

Categories
Productivity & Work Tech

Denying the GPS

Rarely do we override the GPS because we know a better way.

We depend on technology to reveal answers 99% of the time.  We override technology 1% of the time, and even then we have our doubts.

The irony, of course, is that while technology makes our lives easier, we forfeit the chance to think and learn new things.  We know more than ever but we experience less.  

Experience puts the bones in the goose.  There’s no evolution without a beautiful struggle.

The computer is a second brain, threatening our primary neurons.  The machine is replacing the animal in all of us.