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Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

Work x “Work”

There are two types of work:

  1. Work that you do for fun
  2. Work that pays the bills

The first is sexy and fuels your creativity. These are typically side projects that you wish would one day turn into a long-term job that pays the bills.

The second type of work is the one you do to live. These are your standard projects and office jobs that support a commercial company. They’re not sexy but they’re reassuring and provide enough cash flow to do more creative work.

The difference between the sexy and the dependable types of work is what Hugh MacLeod calls the Sex and Cash Theory.

There’s always friction to create stuff that matters, at least to you, versus creating stuff that maintains someone else’s bottom line. Both nonetheless complement each other as an influence of skills. It’s all practice, anyway.

The end-goal for all creators is the fusion of sex and cash, to get paid for doing what you love. But even that sometimes runs its course. Whatever you end up doing, at work or on the side, make it a good one!

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Arts Productivity & Work

Be good at two things

Cartoonist and former ad copywriter Hugh MacLeod sent out an excellent newsletter about being good at two things. In it, he spells out the reasons why we should be knowledgeable in two areas in order to maximize our unique career potential. #gif
via giphy

Cartoonist and former ad copywriter Hugh MacLeod sent out an excellent newsletter about being good at two things. In it, he spells out the reasons why we should be knowledgeable in two areas in order to maximize our unique career potential.

When you’re very good at “n”, there are probably thousands of people who are also good at “n”. But if you are good at “n + 1”, that number is far smaller.

A good example is this Irish dude I knew in London, back in the day.

He started off as an aspiring journalist, who studied English at a prestigious British University, just like thousands and thousands of other clever, would-be British journo types.

But before he went job hunting in the newspaper business, he spent four years working in on North Sea oil rigs as a roustabout. That experience gave him a tough, inside, visceral knowledge of the oil industry, which he could eventually bring to  a top job as an energy correspondent for the Financial Times, the prestigious European newspaper.

“Be good at two things”: Oil-plus-journalism. Exactly.

The post reiterates what fellow cartoonist Scott Adams implores in his life advice about “becoming very good (top 25%) at two or more things.” He writes about his own success:

The magic is that few people can draw well and write jokes. It’s the combination of the two that makes what I do so rare. And when you add in my business background, suddenly I had a topic that few cartoonists could hope to understand without living it.

Do what makes you unique, is the saying. What they didn’t explain is that it takes the synthesis of two skills to be good enough that they can’t ignore you.

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Knowing is half the battle. Experience puts the bones in the goose.
Knowing is half the battle. Experience puts the bones in the goose.

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The price of being a sheep is boredom. The price of being a wolf is loneliness. Choose one or the other with great care.

Hugh Macleod
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The best way to get approval is not to need it.

Hugh MacLeod
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Hugh MacLeod
Hugh MacLeod

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Productivity & Work Quotes Tech Writing

Blogs are like hammers

“Blogs are like ham­mers. They are tools for building stuff.” -- Hugh MacLeod #blogging #blogger #blogs

“Blogs are like ham­mers. They are tools for building stuff.”

Hugh MacLeod (see books)

Blogging is the art of connecting the dots on screen.

art via giphy

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4 Elements of Success

i. Work hard.

ii. Be nice.

iii. Have great pro­duct or service.

iv. Don’t suck. 

Sounds about right.

Authenticity Is The New Bulls**t

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Pacing the Internet

The future of digital technology will be about slowing down, not speeding up. We’ve reached a pace of communication that exceeds our mental capacities, and our thumbs.

We can’t possibly keep up with tweets, instant messages, Facebook messages, push notifications, and Instagrams all at the same time; although, we move so swiftly in between them that sometimes they feel interconnected.

In order to be truly productive we’ll need to pace ourselves. That doesn’t mean disconnecting. What it means is focusing on our work, going for a long jog, and sprinting on social media portals during our breaks to catch up.

You can selective or random in how you choose to participate online. Maybe you use your time to chat on Facebook or read through the Twitter newsfeeds. The challenge is not getting so caught up in them that you forget to jog again.

We’re always online, toggling the crazy rhythm of working and staying connected.  

image

Gaping Void

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How We All Learned to Speak Instagram

Instagrams, worthy of their own language; easily recognizable:

Instagram images have become units of speech, building blocks in a visual vocabulary that functions somewhat like a colonial patois, where old-school darkroom photography is the native tongue and digitization is the imperial language. And like an empire at its height, Instagram is relentlessly making conquests—and in short order. Even people who don’t yet use the app can recognize in its distinctive photos a new visual lingua franca. The images don’t look “filtered” or like Instagrams. They look like … reality.“

Still concur with Hugh MacLeod though:

I like Instagram almost as much as I hate the fact that Facebook owns it.