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Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

More time is better than more money đź’¸

Time is money

Time is the most valuable asset we have, yet we often fritter away the minutes using money.

Instead of walking up the mountain, we pay to take the lift. Instead of using the local train, we hop in a more expensive cab ride. Such convenience circumvents the lived experience.

The most memorable experiences are the ones that stem the pace and allow us to notice the minutiae: the smells, the way people move, communicate, and dress. Ceasing the fight with time, life generates novelty.

Travel, while requiring the funds to do so, is nonetheless a priceless activity. Writes Kevin Kelly in his piece More time is better than more money, living in the present opens a secret vault.

“Here is what I learned from 40 years of traveling: Of the two modes, it is far better to have more time than money.

When you have abundant time you can get closer to core of a place. You can hang around and see what really happens. You can meet a wider variety of people. You can slow down until the hour that the secret vault is opened. You have enough time to learn some new words, to understand what the real prices are, to wait out the weather, to get to that place that takes a week in a jeep.”

Kevin Kelly

No one is doubting that money makes one’s life easier. But we can either like and enviable Instagram photo or try to live it.

Money cheats time by replacing experiences with immediate gratification. The challenges along the way are the richest experiences in disguise. “So if you have a choice,” Kelley writes, “travel with more time than money. You’ll be richer.”

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Business Psychology

The price is right

adam-wilson-12769

If you want to sell more of something, list it second.

The sophisticate never orders the first option in the wine list. People choose the second wine option on the list; the bottle that also happens to be the most popular and most profitable.

Back in the day of CDs, the music listener never bought the album because of the first song. They bought it for the second track, which was usually the lead single played on the radio.

Lists can make for a deceiving design. Customers pay a premium for their misperception.

Categories
Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

What is more important: money or time?

What is more important: money or time?, what is more important time or money

At some point, you’ll need to decide which is more important to you: time or money.

Everybody has the same amount of time. However, few people can enjoy it because they have to go to work. But we can be deliberate with time when it comes, using it pursue a hobby or hang out with friends and family. It’s proven that people who choose time over money spend it wisely and are happier for it.

Some rich folks feel like they never have enough money, so they buy things they never have time to use. They’re unhappy because they confuse time with money, but materialism rarely equates to happiness.

There is no doubt that money makes life easier. Who wants to wait in line, eat Ramen every night, and feel left out because they can’t afford to travel or upgrade their computer? Being poor sucks. But focusing on money fails to create the deeper meaning you seek.

In today’s age, software accelerates time. People feel like they’re playing catch-up, trying to stay on top of the news and their friends’ activities until they realize that the fear of missing out. Comparison is the root their of unhappiness.

“I wanted to pursue my star further,” Jack Kerouac once wrote. What he longed for is more time. The gas tank is starving for fuel so the individual can go out and find meaning. But that same person can always choose to slow down and walk for free.

What Should You Choose: Time or Money? 

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The day you declare a truce on desires for money, power, pleasure and fame is the day you become unhappier.

Arthur C. Brooks
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Music is still a small piece of the pie.
Music is still a small piece of the pie.

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Life & Philosophy Psychology

Free and cheap makes you fat

Everyone loves free stuff. But free stuff makes you fat. When I was a kid growing up in Texas, every restaurant offered free refills. Naturally, my friends and I always had two sodas.

When I moved up to the Northeast, refills didn’t exist. There was always an additional cost. But this cost-constrained choice. I wasn’t going to make my parents pay for more sugar water.

Just yesterday I got my free birthday coffee at Starbucks. The barista thought I was nuts for just ordering a grande Americano. But that’s all I wanted; I didn’t want the caramel macchiato that she was trying to convince me to order.

Enough is enough. Excess, especially at low-quality, can be more harmful than healthy. This goes for food as well as information. Absorbing too many Tweets, emails, and RSS feeds can leave a mind too bloated to reason.

Money is just one barrier in influencing healthier choices. If you have to pay for it, you may reconsider how you consume. Overall, free typically does more harm than good.

“The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

Everything in balance, they say.

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Buying is like sharing

We buy more when we go to the grocery hungry. We buy more as soon as we get paid. And we definitely buy more when there’s a sale.

The urgency to spend is like the urgency to share. If we’re slacking, we feel compelled to share more to make up for the vacancy.

Buying, like sharing, is a never-ending game where we win and we lose at the same time. We win instant gratification. But we lose our bank accounts and our focus, the two currencies of the 21st century.

Emotions dictate our propensity to consume and like. Buying and sharing make us feel good and and curb our fears against missing out.

Managing money and managing your Twitter or Facebook account require
some moderation; debt and defriending/unfollowing are just around the corner.

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For everyone who rips Twitter for not being profitable. Neither are Pandora, Zynga, Yelp, and Groupon.
For everyone who rips Twitter for not being profitable. Neither are Pandora, Zynga, Yelp, and Groupon.

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Coins are art in your pocket. They should raise interest.

Gordon Summers, Royal Mint’s Chief Engraver
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In the long run, doing work that’s important leads to more happiness than doing work that’s merely profitable.

Seth Godin