Categories
Writing

Notebooks are ‘a forgotten account with accumulated interest’

Listening seeds ideas. Overheard dialogue, especially misheard words, are auditory stimulants for the imagination. Said Joan Didion in her essay “On Keeping a Notebook:”

“See enough and write it down, I tell myself, and then some morning when the world seems drained of wonder, some day when I am only going through the motions of doing what I am supposed to do… on that bankrupt morning I will simply open my notebook and there it will all be, a forgotten account with accumulated interest, paid passage back to the world out there…”

From the dull to the senseless, an ambient awareness latches on to snippets of interestingness in any conversation. The journal archives and then whispers for a second look. Simply rereading our notes gives them a new form, turning the slightest quip into a saintly significance.

All writing is thinking.

“I don’t know what I think until I try to write it down.”

Joan Didion
Categories
Writing

Everything goes in the queue

The queue is more of a scrapbook than a notebook. It’s a hopper of brain farts and observations brewing in all formats: text, images, video, and sound. It’s…

  • Where ideas get stored and intermix
  • Where content molds and takes shape
  • Where visions incubate until the timing is ripe
  • Where some concepts never the day of light

Your goal is to never let the queue go empty. You should always keep refreshing it with new content to help you sustain your thinking presence. The dull, the interesting, the ephemeral; it all goes into the Tumblr bin to age marvelously.

“I’m not writing it down to remember it later, I’m writing it down to remember it now.

Field Notes

Take copious notes and frequently revisit them. In generating novelty, you’ll always be two steps ahead.

Categories
Productivity & Work

From idea to “I did it!”: Seth Godin’s ShipIt Journal

Seth Godin updated his ShipIt journal in collaboration with Moo.

The Shipit Journal works for a simple reason: It’s difficult to write things down. Difficult to break a project into small pieces and take ownership over each one. Mostly, it’s difficult to announce to yourself and to your team that you’re actually on the hook to do great work.

I’m delighted to let you know that the journal is back, but it a much more beautiful format. Created in conjunction with my namesake moo.com, you can find it right here.

It’s a blank book, but one with words in it. Designed to have you add the rest of the words, to write in it, to commit, to share, to ultimately make a ruckus.

Because ‘later is not the way you will ship.’ Do the work.

Note: You can find still find Seth’s original ShipIt Journal Five Pack on Amazon.

Categories
Books Productivity & Work

“Intentional Living” with The Bullet Journal ⚡ Method

There are a lot of Bullet Journal iterations out there today but Ryder Carroll is the originator of the Bullet Journal practice. According to the below video, he calls #bujo “an analog system I devised that will help track the past, organize the present, and plan for the future.”

I’ve dabbled in his Bullet Journal a bit but haven’t nailed it just yet. Thankfully, Carroll released a new book aptly titled The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future (Amazon) to further explain the process and how it helped him become consistently focused and productive. You can download a few of the chapters for FREE right here.