Advertising on the Eiffel Tower (1925 – 1934)

The dawn of ubiquitous advertising found itself on a Paris landmark before World War II.

Between 1925 and 1934, the Eiffel Tower served as a huge illuminated advertisement for Citroën.

Darran Anderson
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You are the one and only

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Image by Les Anderson

‘Go out into the streets of Paris and pick out a cab driver. He will look to you very much like every other cab driver. But study him until you can describe him so that he is seen in your description to be an individual, different from every other cab driver in the world.”

Guy de Maupassant on the process of finding specific uniqueness in everybody, everything.

Débruit – Duman with Murat Ertel

Thinks local. Acts global. (Image courtesy the artist)

Whether it's Istanbul, LA, Congo, or Kingston, Paris electronic producer Débruit seems to work his diverse production palette to the sounds of the local scene.

His latest project débruit & Istanbul highlights the swing and spirit of the Turkish city on the Bosphorus. Below is what Gilles Peterson said about the artist's collaboration on ‘Duman.'

“Istanbul is a melting pot of traditional, visionary, electric, psychedelic, futuristic, melodic and experimental music. On ’Duman,' he links with Murat Ertel, lead singer and guitarist in BaBa ZuLa, one of Turkey’s most beloved alternative bands. The hypnotic cries of a guitar take centre stage, powerfully reverbing as if echoing across the Bosporus. débruit adds his own rhythmic touches with drum machines and synths, coming close to the minimal techno feel of Baris K’s Insanlar project.”

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Is the Mona Lisa really great art?

gif via Jess Mac

“The social scientists are right to say that we should be a little sceptical of greatness, and that we should always look in the next room. Great art and mediocrity can get confused, even by experts. But that’s why we need to see, and read, as much as we can. The more we’re exposed to the good and the bad, the better we are at telling the difference. The eclecticists have it.”

The Mona Lisa was an obscure piece of art before it was stolen. It benefitted from the “cumulative advantage” of being popular. So is it actually any good? I guess it depends on how susceptible you are to popularity and how well you understand art.

Experiences live on in our memories and in the stories we tell, while our material goods ‘disappear’ as we inevitably get used to them. A once-cherished Walkman is now obsolete, but, as Humphrey Bogart once told Ingrid Bergman, ‘We’ll always have Paris.’

Amit Kumar

Experiences > Materialism

Why Americans Fetishize Paris

In any case, whether you’re a veteran expatriate of Paris, if you’ve only toyed with fantasies of skipping stones along the Canal St. Martin, or you’re Kanye West extolling the virtues of Paris’ apparent no bullshit culture, it’s important to realize that you’re fetishizing an unattainable dream. Downer? Perhaps. But it needn’t be. Sometimes dreams are just what we need. Reality can be a lovely place, but for some, and I count myself among them, a corrupted dream is better than no dream at all.

Paris, a place to dream false dreams.