People pot pie 😝

This video of human face pies is a nightmare. The teeth and pies with hair may be the scariest of the lot, while the fact that you can get these customized is haunting.

I know we are still 3 months away from Halloween so apologies in advance.

Go inside the apartment of graphic communicator George Lois

Renowned graphic communicator George Lois takes us on a tour of his apartment. Located in Greenwich Village, what he calls “the best part of Manhattan,” the apartment is full of art. Even the chairs.

'I have chairs all over the house that I don't let anybody sit in. 'Don't sit in that chair!' But it's a chair. No, it's not. It's a work of art.''Click To Tweet

Lois may be most recognized for creating the iconic “I Want My MTV” slogan. But he also designed 92 Esquire covers. He also spearheaded the 1960s Creative Revolution that shaped modern day advertising. Some even think he inspired the attitude of irreverence in Don Draper from Mad Men.

Take it from George Lois: “You have to have the good eye.” There is no doubt the man had a knack for aesthetics.

What does it mean to be me?

Sociologist Erving Goffman believed that all human interaction was a theatrical performance. In his most famous book [easyazon_link identifier=”0385094027″ locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life[/easyazon_link], Goffman called his analysis the study of  “Dramaturgy.”

Dramaturgical analysis is the idea that we present an edited version of our selves when we meet others in person.

All the internet’s a stage

The internet, of course, adds a new layer of complexity to Goffman’s perspective. If social media is edited real life, then our dramaturgical action is the physical extension of it. We are no less authentic online than we are in person.

Goffman’s theory builds on American sociologist Charles Cooley’s ‘The Looking Glass Self’ theory. In 1902, he contextualized the individual:

“I imagine your mind, and especially what your mind thinks about my mind, and what your mind thinks about what my mind thinks about your mind.”

Keep in mind that people didn’t even think of themselves as individuals before the spread of mirrors in the 15th century.

We juggle identities online and off but each of us has a fixed character. It is our friends and family members and Google that know our truest self.

 

A museum of self


The Metropolitan Museum only showcases ten percent of its owned pieces at any given time. The rest of the art is stored somewhere else waiting to be picked and featured.

“A physical museum is itself a sort of data set — an aggregation of the micro in order to glimpse the macro.”

We all have a surfeit inventory of things we’d like to show: our talents, our Instagram and SnapChat selfies, our love for others. But they can’t all be on display at once.

Like a museum, we have to curate our display while also growing our collection.

The timing, packaging, and place for revealing of our greatest attributes and emotions are stories of their own.

Like museum art pieces, personalities also require curation. It’s impossible to show all your cards at once; pick a few from the archive and make the storytelling as compelling as possible.

Blair Small : BSP Training

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Blair Small is an entrepreneur, musician, and photographer based out of New York City. He’s also one of my best friends so I’m happy to feature him as the first guest on this blog.

Who are you and what do you do?

I am Blair Small. I’m a personal trainer, a wedding photographer and a musician, in no particular order. I like to take the “Rennaissance man” approach to my life, and pursue multiple crafts at the same time. I don’t consider any of these things jobs, and for that I’m grateful.

What are you currently working on?

Having my own personal training business has given me the freedom and time to pursue 2 other passions – music and photography. The inherent need I feel to create is fulfilled here. I write music on the the name Georgica, and just released a 7-song EP.

Making music that I’m proud of is what I live for. Wedding photography is a relatively new part of my life. My good friend is an amazing and really successful wedding photographer, and has been training me for the last year to be his associate shooter. Having the opportunity to be under such great and constant tutelage has been unbelievable.

How would you rate your photography skills so far?

Shooting weddings is not easy. It’s probably the most challenging thing I’ve ever done. I was sort of thrown into the fire and given a lot of responsibility from the beginning. At first everything was moving 1000 miles per hour, but as I get more comfortable, things seem to slow down and fall into place. I see improvement every wedding.


“Composing a great photograph is a skill that everyone should have.”


Where do you like to work?

I produce all my music in my apartment, which isn’t ideal, but with today’s software and equipment is very doable. Believe it or not, I often write using my iPads virtual instruments on the train. As far as photography goes. The lesson I’ve learned is shoot everything everywhere. There is never a bad place or opportunity to take a good photograph.

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What motivates you?

Improving my craft is what motivates me. Creating something great is what I live my life for.

What was your earliest ambition?

My earliest ambition was being good at basketball. I remember 6th grade tryouts, all I wanted to do was shoot a 3 pointer, because prior to that, we didn’t play on courts with three-point lines.

What’s one work hack you use that others may find helpful?

With music, there will be times when you don’t have inspiration, or can’t seem to write anything. Don’t force it. Even if it takes a year, that will pass, and you will get into an amazing zone at some point. With photography, you must fail to succeed. Learn from your mistakes. Work to perfect your craft.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned about working or life so far?

I know I’ve been lucky, but…


“if you ever have the chance or opportunity to work for yourself, take the risk and do it. You will NEVER EVER regret it.”


You can find more about Blair Small here:

The Sound of One Hand Clapping

The sound of one hand clapping makes the same sound as two hands clapping such that one hand shares the same impact as two.

While the other hand may not be involved, it’s still part of the overall relationship.

“As you grow older, you will discover you have two hands, one for helping yourself, the other for helping others.” – Audrey Hepburn

Relationships are inseparable. You help yourself so that you can help other people; you help other people so that you can help yourself.

For every action or non-action, there’s reciprocation on the other side. If well-intended, both sides should be complementing the other.

PS: Happy Birthday Audrey Hepburn (via Google)

Hello, World

via giphy

Introductions require a greeting, your name, and if you’re at work maybe a little bit about what you do.

But really all you need is the greeting. As soon as you pronounce your name and your title people start judging you.

Sometimes you’re better off giving the world a simple ‘hello’ and leaving everything else to the imagination.

Identification undermines the mystery of understanding. What you see is what you get.

Does Everything Need a Name?

The first thing people do when encountering something new is seek identification. People are always on a need to know basis.

But as soon as people know, they just as quickly forget. We only remember that which is immediately useful; otherwise everything is just a generality (e.g. “That guy,” “it,” or “that thing”).

The mind requires that we call something, something; it doesn’t cope with uncertainty. If we really need to know but can’t come up with an identifier, we can just as easily use our imagination to make it up.

Names are just noises. We aren’t all what we hear, nor what we see. Everything still lies in question.

The Ebb and Flow of Train Chatter

If you take a snapshot of train chatter you’d see that it gradually rises from the morning on, peaking in the evening. Even the uptick in sound between 7 and 8AM is noticeable.

People care less about you and more about their own privacy in the morning. Direct conversations are virtually disallowed, as are phone calls. Texting is the preferred method of all interaction.

The most significant noise makers in the mornings are the squealing and grinding of the train tracks competing against the loud overhead fans.

As the afternoon approaches the train gathers less people but louder mouths. Feet make their way on the seats. Cell phones ring. Headphone music gets louder. Laissez-faire defines the afternoon.

The evening, especially Friday evening, is a bit of a free for all. The work stops, the drinks pop, the mobile fingers get more aggressive as people respond across social networks and like everything in their feed. Everyone knows each other’s weekend plans.

People unwind as the days lives on; the rules get looser with time. Life resets daily with the emergence of noise.

Here’s a variety of people I passed on the way to work this morning.

Echoing Theron Humphrey, walking New York is a reminder “that every single human is unique.”

I can’t imagine living in any uniform city/country; yet I applied all images here with Instagram’s Sierra filter.  In photography, sometimes everyone gets the same treatment. 

We Aren’t the World

“American participants are exceptional even within the unusual population of Westerners—outliers among outliers.”

Get weird or go home. Normal is boring.

Via Seth’s Blog

In the words of the philosopher Dr. Seuss, “We are all a little weird and life’s a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love.”

Weirdness, Americanness.