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Sunday Social Roundup

  1. Snapchat is starting to offer brands advertising opportunities. I think it’s worth an exploration but Snapchat’s primary focus should be on acquiring new users. Facebook and Twitter didn’t introduce ads until a few years in. However, given that 500 million snaps are sent per day I’m sure the server costs are still to eat away at Snapchat’s investor dollars.

  2. SoundCloud finally caved in to record label demands to license the tracks on its platform. But I think this could be a boon for SoundCloud. The revenue generated through advertising will be shared amongst SoundCloud’s community of creators. SoundCloud is my music platform of choice. Not iTunes, Rdio, Beats, nor Spotify. SoundCloud just has better music and it works like Twitter, which wanted to buy it a couple months ago.

  3. Atlantic Media is building a social media platform that restricts users to share only once per day. Sharing once per day is probably enough anyway, as it’ll force users to focus on quality rather than quantity. Despite the constriction, most people still won’t have to the courage to share.

  4. Elan Morgan quit liking posts on Facebook for 2 weeks and now gets more diverse content in his newsfeed, like Twitter. When I liked the Buzzfeed page a couple weeks ago Facebook basically inundated my feed with Buzzfeed articles forcing me to like. Needless to say, I unfollowed Buzzfeed after a few days. Facebook’s algorithm doesn’t need to show every post like Twitter.

  5. Millennials are the last generation to understand what the old analog world is like. Meanwhile, Generation Z will have no context whatsoever having grown up with the Internet and touch screens. Are pens and paper still useful?

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Sunday Social Roundup

  1.  YouTube stars are the new Hollywood.  They’ve got millions of subscribers and crying fans.  All because these YouTubers decided to record themselves having fun or teaching what they love.  It’s a DIY world.  

  2.  All social networks seem to be unbundling their apps to do niche things. Foursquare spun off check-ins in its new Swarm app.  LinkedIn has an app dedicated to job search.  Facebook just forced all it’s users this week to download the Messenger app.  I’m not so sure this is a winning strategy.  

  3.  Posit: Getting replaced by ‘Facebook Places’ in Instagram’s geo-tag was the beginning of the end for Foursquare.  There’s just no way Foursquare can last, unless it sells all that valuable check-in data to another company.  

  4. Pinterest launched a direct messenger tool in its platform.  It’s less about chat than it is about speaking through aspirational images.  It’s already much better than Twitter’s DM service.

    + Here’s a graph showing that Internet users prefer to share privately much more than publicly. Vehicles for sharing real life outperform our publicly edited shared lives. Dark social wins.

  5.  Social media is not about shopping just yet. Would you like to buy something while socializing in a bar?  Nonetheless, Twitter seems to think it can make social shopping happen.

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FaceTime and the Perils of Public Discourse

The theme of mobile open dialogue and Internet browsing is trending. I partly blame FaceTime and mobile video conversation for this emergence.

As a daily train commuter, I see a lot of the ways people deal with technology. And by far the most invasive development of them all is FaceTime.

FaceTime allows iPhone users to chat face to face on their mobile devices. While this is fantastic for home and work conversations, bringing family and colleagues into your space, it’s typically a nuisance for everyone else if used in public.

FaceTime is training users that it’s ok to broadcast live video out loud, including YouTube. Yesterday, one man on my train was blasting a movie preview on YouTube. The guy behind him was talking to his wife on FaceTime about dinner plans. Thankfully someone had the courage tell them both to quiet down.

If you’re going to chat, watch online videos and movies or listen to music, the proper etiquette is to use headphones. We already overhear enough banter as it is; we certainly don’t need to know what you’re doing tonight or what movie you’ll illegally BitTorrent next.

Unfortunately, I think technology continues to evolve like a Google Hangout where everyone gets included on the conversation by default. Before, we were just spying on each other. Now we can’t figure out a away to get away from each other.

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Sunday Social Roundup

Below are some of the more interesting and innovative social media developments from this week.

  1. Facebook released a new app for approved celebrities/influencers. The best part about it is that it doesn’t have ads. Why can’t Facebook offer its regular users an as-free option? I’d pay $1/year for a clean feed.

  2. Another week, another tech story on how to go on a digital diet and escape social networks. Here’s a little post I wrote in 2013 about the fallacy of escaping social networks.

  3. The statistics show that social networkers are actually consuming long-form content despite scanning short-form snacks. In other words, nothing has really changed. You engage longer with content you actually like.

  4. Private, ephemeral sharing is the new public. Even analog photobooths are getting in on the new obsession with disappearing content.  The Eraser does just that. It takes your pic and quickly erases it.

  5. Customers are staying longer in restaurants because they’re wasting time on their Smartphones. That’s good news for restaurants that need the crowds but bad news for restaurants that need you to get in and out.

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What Happens in Snapchat, Stays in Snapchat

Snapchat works like Vegas, whatever stories get exchanged on the platform live there as a forgotten memory, surviving only through exaggerated stories.

Snapchat is how memories of our experiences used to work:  We share moments with someone else and then retell stories through the imagination with no evidence to support it.

Instant communication is becoming more image based.  And communication apps are the true social networks where people send messages that are relevant to the receiver.  Conversation is truly two-way.  Snapchat is the antithesis to Facebook’s supposed algorithmic newsfeed.  

It turns out people do want to live imperfect lives and not the edited versions they see on Facebook and Instagram.  Snapchat facilitates spontaneous conversation; the medium is the message.  So how about snapchatting another, (unedited) selfie?

PS: Add me on Snapchat – bombtune

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This is the Modem World: Social networking makes us feel alone

“Social networking rewards us for being social with people we’re not actually being social with. It validates us. We already know our real friends like us. But we want likes from those who weren’t invited or weren’t there to begin with. How messed up is that?”

Socializing online should be the pre-social behavior to actual socializing in real life.

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They are social places, not networks

Social networking sites like to pretend they are “the network”, or at least “a network” —and that’s why they’ll ask you to “join”. But as users, deep down, we know they are places —we’ll go there to meet some of our social connections, or even make new ones, and talk and share our thoughts and stories, and we’ll leave if the place gets too crowded, or if we don’t like the people that frequent it. And we’ll tell our friends of this “cool new place”, or ask them if they’ve found a new place if they stop showing up.

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest are all social networking places, not social networks.  They are not inclusive, they are exclusive.  Each platform dictates a type of unique style and content you wouldn’t necessary share on another. 

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Social Networking in the 1600s

Coffee houses were the original social networks. Ideas bloomed but similarly, so too did distraction.

Rather than enemies of industry, coffeehouses were in fact crucibles of creativity, because of the way in which they facilitated the mixing of both people and ideas. Members of the Royal Society, England’s pioneering scientific society, frequently retired to coffeehouses to extend their discussions. Scientists often conducted experiments and gave lectures in coffeehouses, and because admission cost just a penny (the price of a single cup), coffeehouses were sometimes referred to as “penny universities.” It was a coffeehouse argument among several fellow scientists that spurred Isaac Newton to write his “Principia Mathematica,” one of the foundational works of modern science.

“Penny universities” reminded me of modern day micro-payments, like the 99 cents you pay to iTunes. However, the author thinks it’s more of a freemium for participation, the modern version of free online education assuming you have wifi.

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Facebook Made Me Do It

“The fact that the world is going to see you increases the risks you are willing to take. We see this all the time on social media in protests, and the same is true for graffiti. It’s performative.”

More likes increase the likeliness to share. Ship dangerously.

Equally valid:

“Social media makes it easier to share acts of stupidity. But people have always been, and will continue to be, stupid, with or without the tools to share.”

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Apple Is Building a Social Music Network

Ad hoc music networking:

Instead of creating playlists and sharing them with people on Spotify or Rdio, or sending an MP3 to a friend, or huddling around a stereo listening to music, you’re going to be able to quickly spin up a group of neighboring iOS devices, and share music amongst them.

If this is true, Apple is on to something here.  People want to share content through the web without the risk of having it live on forever.  Enter Snapchat

As Cult of Mac writes:  

While Google and Facebook are all about harvesting data and keeping it online forever, Apple can satisfy demand for privacy and consequence-free communication and social networks by promising to dissolve event-based social networks and delete messages.