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Culture Life & Philosophy

Freedom of Speech

Photo by Wells Baum

Maybe the best way to express something is just to say it how it is.

People like honest opinions because they are most likely what they think too but don’t know how to express.

Someone’s got to speak up; someone’s got to clarify without restraint.

Everything can be explained if you just let go and try to understand the essence of the issue.

Simplicity is also hard to come by because of the resistance of the truth. Once you express yourself rather than impress others, words come more naturally.

You don’t need more time. You need to raise your words. Tell it how it is, and how it could be. Give yourself permission to speak up.

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Uncategorized

Texting Isn’t Writing, It’s Fingered Speech

Texting isn’t written language. It much more closely resembles the kind of language we’ve had for so many more years: spoken language.- John McWhorter, Columbia University linguistics professor

Texting is speaking with our fingers. This rapid communication has led to abbreviated expressions such as “Lol” and emoticons like “;).”

They say to write as we speak but texting has made this advice more complicated. You can’t hand in a paper written in text language.

“Fingered speech” is a third communication medium, a symbiosis of writing and speech.

Categories
Culture History

The history of Braille

via giphy

There’s only one language for the blind. It’s called Braille.

Before today, I knew nothing about the history of Braille:

Braille has its roots in the French army. In the early eighteenth century, a soldier named Charles Barbier de la Serre invented a code for military messages that could be read in the trenches at night without light; it used patterns of twelve raised dots to represent phonemes. The system was too complicated for the beleaguered soldiers to master, but when Barbier met Louis Braille, who had been blind since boyhood, the latter simplified the system into the six-dot version used ever since. Braille is not a language per se but rather a code by which other languages, from English to Japanese to Arabic…

Blind readers and writers can also see.  They activate the unused visual cortex and see their way through touch and sound.  They can even use their tongue to sense images.

Technology makes our brains even more plastic, rewiring them until the day we die.