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News Social Media Tech

Blame the humans, not the bots, for retweeting false news

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According to research done by data scientists at MIT, it is humans, not bots, which disseminate false news.

The study began with the 2013 Boston bombings when Twitter spread inaccurate rumors about the aftermath of the events.

The three authors of the study then took it upon themselves to dig deeper into the fake news phenomenon by examining tweets of 3 million users from the years 2006 to 2017.

Blame the humans, not the machines

The overarching result is that false news spreads faster than real news because people on Twitter are more likely to retweet novelty. Said MIT professor and researcher Sinan Aral, “We found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, bots accelerate the spread of true and false stories at the same rate. False news spreads more than the truth because humans, not robots, are more likely to spread it.”

Sensationalism stokes retweets. In fact, “false news stories are 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than true stories are. It also takes true stories about six times as long to reach 1,500 people as it does for false stories to reach the same number of people.”

MIT scientists believe misinformation also runs rampant on Facebook but is harder to detect because it lives in the echo chambers of a walled garden: FB groups, private posts, and direct messages (re: dark social). Because of Russia’s election meddling in 2016, both Facebook and Twitter are finally taking efforts to improve their platforms for better veracity detection. Fact-checking is more vital than ever.

Humans are suckers for captivating but erroneous news. Some people even refuse to let go. As Mark Twain so wisely noted, “It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.” The good news is that the truth never expires, even if it takes longer to percolate.

gif via Ryan Seslow

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Apps Culture Tech

Why some children struggle to hold pencils

According to doctors, you can blame tech for children’s inability to hold pencils. Apparently all that screen time is doing nothing to strengthen their thumb, index, and middle fingers which work together to form one’s basic writing technique.

How to hold a pencil correctly for writing, #tech, mobile, students today
Illustration via The Guardian

Generation thumbs

Having grown up with perpetual swiping and speaking in images and emoji, the next generation is obviously going to encounter difficulty with old ways of doing analog things. Do they even teach cursive writing in school anymore?

We speak in images. But at least early cavemen knew how to draw with their version of a stylus.

Read Children struggle to hold pencils due to too much tech, doctors say

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Productivity & Work Psychology Science

The simple technique that boosts your short and long-term memory

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Want to remember more of what you read? Give your brain a 10-15 minute rest. No phones, no distractions, just pure boredom, a quiet room and dimmed lights.

Why do we need to reduce interference?

It takes longer for new information to encode and simply consuming more or squandering time on social media will make it even hard to remember.

When we let the mind wander, the brain works backward and connects the dots, cementing those memories that were previously unlinked.

So stop chasing extra stimulation and let your brain rest in its own presence. Your memory will thank you for it.

Read An effortless way to improve your memory

 

 

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Productivity & Work Science

Guiding a neophyte mathematician to name the biggest number 🔢

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People are afraid of big numbers because they have no spatial understanding; the largest numbers are beyond comprehension, as the multitude of chess moves or the unfathomable number of sand grains in the desert. Infinity appears impossible to count!

University of Texas computer science professor Scott Aaronson believes the answer to naming the world’s biggest number lies within the deepest paradigm, some of which is solvable by exponentials, language, and sheer imagination:

“When thinking about 3, 4, or 7, we’re guided by our spatial intuition, honed over millions of years of perceiving 3 gazelles, 4 mates, 7 members of a hostile clan. But when thinking about BB(1000), we have only language, that evolutionary neophyte, to rely upon. The usual neural pathways for representing numbers lead to dead ends. And this, perhaps, is why people are afraid of big numbers.”

Read Who Can Name the Bigger Number?

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Psychology Science

Perception as a flexible gate

Count the number of passes between those in white shirts.

If you saw 15 passes, congrats. But did you notice a gorilla? Half of the people miss it which suggests that their focus is too narrow.

Our vision is tied to our creativity, particularly our ability to combine images. Says scientist Anna Antinori who conducted a recent perceptual processing test called ‘binocular rivalry‘ at the University of Melbourne:

“Open people appear to have a more flexible gate and let through more information than the average person.”

Close-minded people literally see and experience the world differently. The good news that the personalities are elastic. All it takes is one eye-opening experience or book to boost your curiosity.

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Categories
Business Psychology

A little less data, a little more action

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It’s easy to lose yourself in the details and get caught in the maelstrom of facts. But if you turn your focus on the customer experience, you can start to see the forest through the trees.

McDonald’s can keep improving the taste of its smoothies to negligible sales results. It turns out that it’s not the taste that drives consumption but rather the purpose.

According to a study led by Harvard business school professor Clayton Christenson, the majority of smoothies sell in the morning. Commuters revealed that they wanted to hold onto something filling in their hand for the ride to work.

Data tells only half the story. The other half explains the actual choices people make. Practical observation goes beyond a spreadsheet and into the streets.