Categories
Tech

Time to get up!

Gif of fingers walking on a mobile phone screen

The only thing truly scary about excess screen time is a lack of exercise. When your eyes get stuck, so does you butt and your neck.

Fortunately, the same tech that keeps you grounded can also remind you to move. Thanks to my iWatch prompts, I avoid the digital vacuum and walk around the apartment and take the dog out more often.

Statistics keep you honest. You got to get your steps in or the tech will call you out. Needless to say, digital health monitoring has a huge future.

From sharing status updates to tracking your sedentary status, technology is the glue that binds and motivates people. All this connectivity is like the reinvention of printing press but with no strings attached.

The internet has infinite inventory to entertain and distract you all day. But your health and attention are scarce resources. They have a shelf life.

Just remember to disconnect more often than you think. Once you grab a leash and take your thoughts for a walk, everything will be just fine.

gif by @alexkao

Categories
Productivity & Work

Deep work

Who would’ve thought that your future success rests on the ability to disconnect from the internet and do deep work. If you want to get good at anything, you’ll need to practice for hours with deliberate focus. In an interview with James Altucher, professor, and author Cal Newport suggests that you need three to four hours of intense training each day, whether that be writing, playing the guitar, or shooting hoops.

Newport’s book So Good They Can’t Ignore You argues that skills trump passion, that the reward for putting in the work is the attention your deserve. If you can be consistent, it’s shouldn’t take the 10,000 hours of practice to master something.

It’s hard to delay gratification in a world that teaches you to do everything now. Action is more noticeable than inaction. You go to work to spend more time answering email and slack conversations than tackling a project with long-term benefits. You’re graded based on your ability to manage velocity. It’s no wonder people burn out.

The web is a gift and a curse, a tool for connectedness that can often lead to drowning in a pool of dopamine. Who would’ve thought your success would be determined by your ability to single-task and the only way to get your mind back would be to appreciate doing nothing.

Categories
Uncategorized

Reclaiming Our (Real) Lives From Social Media

“Like a virus slowly invading its victim, social media has methodically started to consume every hour of my day.”

And so Nick Bilton reads books instead, at least in his first waking hour.

I doubt the new habit will last.