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Creativity Culture Productivity & Work

Learning to think again

Humans are thinking creatures. Otherwise, the only difference between humans and other animals is that we have bigger brains that also allow us to speak.

But we use less brainpower every day because we use calculators, Google, and self-driving cars. We’re not lazy.; we just prefer to do the things we want so we can carry on with the business of living.

However, what we risk skipping though are the lessons in between. The proclivity to outsource learning and move on never give neurons a chance to make new synaptic connections.

When we want to recall a statistic or a dig back into our vocabulary, the brain goes through the process of unlearning a skill. To avoid automation, the mind runs past its library of facts and pictures and jogs the mind’s memory.

Thinking is a bicep curl for the mind

Yet today, we’re more likely to divert our chance to think, choosing the exactitude of bots and recipes rather than leaning into our ignorance to solve problems.

Nevertheless, what most digital naysayers don’t realize is that new technology, whether it’s the rise of machines via the industrial revolution or smart computers driving artificial intelligence, will always birth other things to learn like coding. Coding feeds the machines and tells them what to do. However, we should resist becoming the tools of our tools, as Thoreau admonished.

We’re both and winning losing it at the neurocognitive level while advancing society at the same time. The hard part will be holding on to ambiguity, the space in between the strange things, as the data will always feel the need to identify and fix things. Most importantly, what thinking teaches us is that it’s ok to be wrong.

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Life & Philosophy Quotes Tech

Alan Turing: “We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.”

 

via giphy

 

“We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.”

Alan Turing
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Subtle

Making things subtle is more difficult than making things simple. Simplicity is the reduction of complexity. Subtle goes further, consolidating and predicting future design while still making something intuitive.

Subtle is more complicated because it’s formless. It rises above simplicity and the obscure. It’s hard to pinpoint but just as easy to see and use once you know it’s there.

Everything is simple. Everything is complex. But only few things can be subtle.