Turkish musician Görkem Şen plays his Yaybahar at the sea 🎼

Turkish musician Görkem Şen uses a Yaybahar, an acoustic instrument that combines a hodgepodge of drums, coiled spring, and strings that he plays with a wrapped mallet.

Although the device looks antiquated, the sound is classical electronic. It reminds me of William Orbit’s ‘Adagio for Strings.’ It also pairs well with the beauty of the seaside.

Two birds, one stone. And deep space vibes.

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A trip through New York City, 1911

In 1911, Swedish film company Svenska Biografteatern recorded its trip to New York.

Fortunately, the footage survived and most recently was speed-corrected and reproduced with added street sounds of car horns, horses, and police whistles to give us a sense of the environment back then.

Some observations:

  • Notice all the people wearing hats
  • The streets look a bit empty compared to today’s zoo
  • Cable powered trolleys
  • The kids go nuts when the camera is on them. Nothing’s changed!

What’s your favorite scene?

 

The cake server 🍰

Brooklyn-based inventor Joseph’s Machines makes comical DIY contraptions. His latest video shows a chain-reaction machine deliver him a piece of cake. It also includes a baby poking on iPhone, a string of melting butter, and a chandelier.

The video took 3 months to make. Piece a cake!

Joseph’s gadgets are inspired by the cartoonist and inventor Rube Goldberg who built complex, interconnected machines in the early 1900s. Today, people use the expression Rube Goldberg machine. to describe anything convoluted, from machines to politics.

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Rube Goldberg’s Self-Operating Napkin (1931)

(h/t The Loop)

Watch Mark Zuckerberg testify live before the Senate right here

Watch Zuckerberg’s testify live before the Senate right here
(Photo via SAUL LOEB/Getty Images)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is about to testify before the US Senate. You can expect the hearing to focus on the manipulation of data in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

‘Move fast and break things’

Can Zuckerberg rectify the damage he’s done to digital oil? We never worry about our privacy until its too late.

Watch the privacy theater live below and highlights after the jump. Scroll down for a live viewing of Day 2.

Day 1


Highlights Day 1:


Day 2 — Live Now…


Highlights Day 2:

The Dog Photographer

William Wegman is a photographer famous for his portraits of dogs.

For the last 45 years, Wegman has been dressing up his Weimaraners in human clothes and making them do everyday poses.

“Dogs are always in a state of becoming something: they become characters, objects…when they’re lying down they’re becoming landscapes.”

His dogs have since appeared in children’s books, videos for Sesame Street and an appearance on Saturday Night Live.

Over 300 of his images appeared in William Wegman: Being Human (Amazon link), released last year.

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All images courtesy William Wegman

Remembering MLK in restored NBC video

In some rarely-seen footage from 1967, Martin Luther King Jr. talks about the new phase of the Civil Rights movement for “genuine equality.” For 26 minutes, he’s just as eloquent and sincere as you imagined:

“It is cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps…And many Negroes, by the thousands and millions, have been left bootless … as the result of a society that deliberately made his color a stigma…”

King was assassinated 11 months later. Today marks the 50th anniversary of his death.

Zeynep Tufekci: We’re building a dystopia just to make people click on ads

Are we selling our souls for ads?

Technosociologist Zeynep Tufecki seems to think so. The Cambridge Analytica-Facebook debacle demonstrates the Wild West of data exploitation.

Facebook can’t pin the blame on the machine-optimizing algorithms. It’s humans who are responsible for managing the equations and policing validity.  A recent study also proved that it is humans, not bots, that spread fake news.

Data is the new oil

Even worse, says Tufecki, the precedent sets the stage for those in power to leverage data to their own advantage:

We’re building this infrastructure of surveillance authoritarianism merely to get people to click on ads. And this won’t be Orwell’s authoritarianism. This isn’t “1984.” Now, if authoritarianism is using overt fear to terrorize us, we’ll all be scared, but we’ll know it, we’ll hate it and we’ll resist it.

But if the people in power are using these algorithms to quietly watch us, to judge us and to nudge us, to predict and identify the troublemakers and the rebels, to deploy persuasion architectures at scale and to manipulate individuals one by one using their personal, individual weaknesses and vulnerabilities, and if they’re doing it at scale through our private screens so that we don’t even know what our fellow citizens and neighbors are seeing, that authoritarianism will envelop us like a spider’s web and we may not even know we’re in it.

Tufecki paints the picture of a haunting dystopia at our doorstep. And it’s the social networks, which started off so benign that may be opening the maw of hell.

MF DOOM x Madlib: Speaking through music

MF DOOM recaps his experience with producer Madlib when they recorded the epic Madvillainy album 14 years ago.

“We spoke through the music. He’ll (Madlib) hear the joint and that’s like my conversation with him. And I’d hear a beat, and that’s like what he was saying to me.”

There are so many gems on the Madvillainy album but if I had to choose one (re: a few):

Music as telepathy. Beats as Madvillainy

‘The right to disconnect’ 📱

Stop working from home and get some rest. Even better, plan some unscheduled time.

Sincerely,

France

Wait, what?

On January 1st of this year, France passed the ‘right to disconnect‘ law which enforces a digital diet outside working hours. The rule prohibits employers from calling or emailing employees during personal time. France already imposes 35-hour works weeks.

It’s still too early to tell if French citizens are actually abiding by the rule meant to restore sanity in our always-on culture. But the intent is the right one: we need to create more space for relaxation. Keep in mind that our brains are working even when they’re powered off 💤. Disconnecting is a right, even if it feels a little foreign to put to rectangular glow aside

Colombia’s rainbow river 🌈 is the most beautiful in the world

Labeled the most beautiful river in the world, the Caño Cristales or Cano Crystals gets its blend of colors (orange, red, blue, green, and yellow) from the way light and move over the macarenia clavigera plant.

Tourists were told to stay away from the river in the early 2000s because it was a guerilla haven.  It appears to be open today.

Simon Sinek: Do little things

Consistency is a series of small efforts that over time add up to create a big impact. Seth Godin calls this ‘the drip‘, or what Simon Sinek calls doing ‘the little things.’

Do small things. They add up.

Little things are the deeds one fulfills over a period of time. Whether it’s for love or business, good habits strengthen relationships and build trust.

It turns out that honesty and unselfishness are good for companies and good for life.

Video: Jóhann Jóhannsson ‘A Song For Europa’

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London-based STUDIO AKA animated Icelandic electronica composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s hauntingly beautiful tune ‘A Song For Europa’ from the 2016 album release, Orpheé.

The video brings life to the track’s dubby recordings of the Numbers Stations, mimicking the radio waves that broadcast intelligence messages to operatives in foreign countries.

The Oscar-nominated musician passed away last February.

Picasso: Art as a form of diary

picasso #art #artist #painting
Photo by Cecil Beaton 1933 © The Cecil Beaton Archive at Sotheby’s

Art is where our mind’s eye merges with reality to create a theater inside our head, resulting in the form of a diary. This was especially true for Pablo Picasso.

Picasso was perhaps best known for his practice of public journaling via painting. “My work is my diary. I have painted my autobiography,” he said.

Picasso grasped his inner thoughts and projected them on canvass. His art gave us a peek inside his head, such as his relationship with partner Marie-Thérèse Walter in his formative years.

picasso tate modern #museum #art
‘The Dream’ (1932) Private collection © Succession Picasso/DACS London

Art is therapy

Art is an instrument for coping, part mental therapy part expression. Bottling his thoughts without letting them go would’ve driven Picasso insane. Whether it is painting, writing, or playing sports, we exercise our bodies to verify that we’re still alive.

As Picasso and so many other artists illustrate, self-expression has a real and irresistible pulse.


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