Categories
Productivity & Work

How to make better decisions

If you’re going to make an important decision, make it in the morning. Your natural levels of serotonin are dopamine are higher, your focus is sharper and your brain will be more rational.

The afternoon, meanwhile, is costly for decision-making. You’re more likely to be tired, hungry, and to acquiesce to the status quo.

The longer we wait in the day to make decisions, the increased chance those decisions will get postponed or lazily agreed to. And desultory decisions might as well be indecisions.

To think different and combat conformity requires a certain amount of energy and belief that’s scientifically more prevalent before noon.

Categories
Life & Philosophy

Life is a pendulum of experiences

It was miserable. It was wonderful. It was the best of times. It was the worst of times.

You can’t experience one high without experiencing another low.

Life doesn’t work on a scale of 1 to 10. It ebbs and flows.

A step forward reverts in a step back, and vice versa. Life is a pendulum of experiences.

Embrace the swings. The chaos is why it works.

Categories
Science Video

The persistence of memory

What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.

Carl Sagan, from the Cosmos episode “The Persistence of Memory”
Categories
Video

The Earth from the international space station

If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs…
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting…
If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim…
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you…
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it.

Rudyard Kipling, “If”
Categories
Travel Video

Watch thousands of Kung Fu masters from space

Watch thousands of Kung Fu masters from space

How neat is this: Watch thousands of Shaolin kung fu students give a synchronized Kung Fu display from space.

The film sequence is part of BBC’s new Earth from Space series.

Categories
Arts Creativity

Filters of mind

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John Berger’s Ways of Seeing (1972)

The challenge isn’t knowing what to see. The challenge is learning how to see. As soon as you learn what to look for, your originality dwindles. Your interpretation becomes someone else’s.

To see well, in pictures and words, you have to know how to notice the good from the bad. Pictures speak in words. If what you see in your Instagram is uninteresting or cliche, then it may be worth skipping or unfollowing the user. If what you’re reading on your Twitter or RSS feeds is banter or click bait, keep scrolling, filter that keyword, or unfollow (friends and family aside) that individual if their predictability continues.

On the other hand, if the images or words make you think or feel like you’re learning something, keep tabs on that feed. A talented Instagram or a Twitter user can be equivalent to visiting a museum, reading an excellent book, or listening to an interesting lecture where there’s more signal than noise.

Of course, no one’s interesting all the time. There’s nothing wrong with using social media to have fun. But as an overall principle, if you point your antenna to the right people, you can consume the most intriguing stories and ignore the rest.

Bonus: Watch John Berger’s Ways of Seeing, and you’ll never look at a picture the same way again.