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Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

Work x "Work"

There are two types of work:

  1. Work that you do for fun
  2. Work that pays the bills

The first is sexy and fuels your creativity. These are typically side projects that you wish would one day turn into a long-term job that pays the bills.

The second type of work is the one you do to live. These are your standard projects and office jobs that support a commercial company. They’re not sexy but they’re reassuring and provide enough cash flow to do more creative work.

The difference between the sexy and the dependable types of work is what Hugh MacLeod calls the Sex and Cash Theory.

There’s always friction to create stuff that matters, at least to you, versus creating stuff that maintains someone else’s bottom line. Both nonetheless complement each other as an influence of skills. It’s all practice, anyway.

The end-goal for all creators is the fusion of sex and cash, to get paid for doing what you love. But even that sometimes runs its course. Whatever you end up doing, at work or on the side, make it a good one!

Categories
Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

Working backward

We all know what we want. Our main challenge is in getting there. But if we take our end-destination and outline the steps to achieve it working backward, it suddenly becomes less intimidating.

We can’t afford to skip any steps. Mastering each tread fortifies the fundamentals which help push us through temporary and unforeseen hurdles.

Greatness is scarce because so few people want to struggle.

They think they can perfect the work in theory over practice. Success is ultimately a summary of our failures.

We should feel compelled to identify what you want and map out the road it takes to get there. We may never arrive at the final destination but instead, be redirected to something even better than we could’ve imagined.

Categories
Arts Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work Tech

Brian Eno: ‘Try not to get a job’

What would the world look like if everyone was guaranteed a basic income?

For musician Brian Eno, that society would put a lot more emphasis on time well spent.

“Try not to get a job. Try to leave yourself in a position where you do the things you want to do with your time and where you take maximum advantage of wherever your possibilities are.”

Brian Eno

Of course, not everyone can afford to remain jobless; the harsh reality is that work pays the bills and keeps us alive. But as more jobs get outsourced to robots and artificial intelligence, humans will need new ways to think about their responsibility.

What will we do when there’s no work to be done?

Work defines who we are. It forms the nucleus of our identity. However, a jobless world may encourage more innovative thinking about ourselves and our role in a secular, globalized world.  Perhaps it’ll compel some people to pursue more passionate work, the type of vocations that choose them instead of the other way around.

In such a world, we’ll be makers instead of cogs, thinkers instead of algorithmic lemmings. Writes Oliver Burkeman in The Antidote: “There is a positive correlation between the fear of death and the sense of unlived life.”

To work on something we actually enjoy is to live.

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Books Life & Philosophy

It's a hard-knock life

The easy life exists but it fails to register.

Anyone who’s name is worth remembering endured some type of struggle.

The imperfect life contains lingering questions and punctuating doubts. But the vulnerable also acts — whether out of curiosity or bravery.

“I never lose. I either win or learn.”

Nelson Mandela

Knowledge is a byproduct of failed activity.

It’s the hard-knock life, after all.

Categories
Arts Life & Philosophy

Why not play all the notes at once?

Sometimes we need to play all of our notes to land the one that is essential.

Specializing as a generalist, we should devour taste-testing and taste-making without fear of rejection, and feel free to spit out everything imaginable.

It is within this state, as sloppy as it may appear — with all the rough drafts tossed around — that clarity arises from the chaos.

“It’s as though people expect you to blow one note all the time, and I guess a lot of people can only blow one note. But there are people who can blow two or three notes, and I guess I’m one of them.”

Frank Gehry

We can out-do anything and raze it to its essence.

Only a person with blinders toots the same note again and again.

Categories
Life & Philosophy Productivity & Work

The plasticity of consciousness

Knowledge helps one toggle the symbiosis of order and disorder.

Free to fool around, the mind treads confidently in its concrete plan. But the soul refuses to pay the price for rigidity — the head and the heart remain adaptable.

Never too invested to quit, pledged to keep pushing in one direction, we proceed with a tranquil approach to progress.