Risky indecision


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In the absence of ideas, we’re lost floating at sea.

Weighed down in idea debt, a lack of action can have the same debilitating effect.

Interia is the purported enemy. Just write the truest sentence already.

What works better is facing fear and proceeding right into it.

Keep your eyes on the prize and spend your time wisely, for the latter is never under your control.

Remain undecided at your own risk. Faith knows that even the wrong ideas fail successfully.

‘Mankind = manikin = mannequin’


Memory Theatre book cover

 

Let me put this in a simple linguistic formula: Mankind = manikin = mannequin. Like Plato’s demiurge or creator-deity in the Timaeus, the fashion designer takes the old rags of matter and forms them into something sublime. God is the great fashion designer in the sky and the fashion designers here on earth are his prophets, his true disciples: mortal portals to his immortal power.

Simon Critchley, Memory Theatre

‘Intention without action is an insult to those who expect the best from you’


Andy Andrews, The Noticer

Despite popular belief to the contrary, there is absolutely no power in intention. The seagull may intend to fly away, may decide to do so, may talk with the other seagulls about how wonderful it is to fly, but until the seagull flaps his wings and takes to the air, he is still on the dock. There’s no difference between that gull and all the others. Likewise, there is no difference in the person who intends to do things differently and the one who never thinks about it in the first place. Intention without action is an insult to those who expect the best from you.

— Andy Andrews, The Noticer

Paintings by Congolese artist Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga


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“I’m inspired to see different worlds coming together; people living in chaos but partying. It’s like the beauty of a painting that at the same time represents such a harsh reality.”

— Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga, Fragile Responsibility

Facing opposites


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We want to reduce the stress in our lives, yet we keep piling on the number of things we need to do. We travel arms wide open into a tidal wave of responsibilities.

We want to restrict the data tech companies collect from us, yet we swipe right at consent. All terms, all conditions, in favor of the Leviathan.

We want to think we’re a curious bunch, open to a world unknown, yet act like novices at the ways of seeing. What is new leads somewhere new, absent the spot.

We meditate to detach the mind from surfeit consciousness when simply going for a walk, doing the dishes, or shooting hoops produces the same relaxing effect. With little effort, the neuronal spike trains intensify in voltage.

Opposite to everything, without opposition to anything. Whatever one says is true, the opposite is equally true.

Skim reading is the new normal


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Ziming Liu from San Jose State University has conducted a series of studies which indicate that the “new norm” in reading is skimming, with word-spotting and browsing through the text. Many readers now use an F or Z pattern when reading in which they sample the first line and then word-spot through the rest of the text. When the reading brain skims like this, it reduces time allocated to deep reading processes. In other words, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings, to perceive beauty, and to create thoughts of the reader’s own.

Read Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound

We are cultivating impatience, begetting callousness and ignorance. We need to go deeper. Huxley forewarned us.

‘Awakening is not a thing…It is not something to be attained’


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Awakening is not a thing. It is not a goal, not a concept. It is not something to be attained. It is a metamorphosis. If the caterpillar thinks about the butterfly it is to become, saying ‘And then I shall have wings and antennae,’ there will never be a butterfly. The caterpillar must accept its own disappearance in its transformation. When the marvelous butterfly takes wing, nothing of the caterpillar remains.

— Alejandro Jodorowsky, Where the Bird Sings Best

Philip Roth on naps


“Let me tell you about the nap,” he laughs. “It’s absolutely fantastic. When I was a kid, my father was always trying to tell me how to be a man, and he said to me, I was maybe 9, and he said to me, ‘Philip, whenever you take a nap, take your clothes off, put a blanket on you, and you’re going to sleep better.’ Well, as with everything, he was right. … Then the best part of it is that when you wake up, for the first 15 seconds, you have no idea where you are. You’re just alive. That’s all you know. And it’s bliss, it’s absolute bliss.”

Philip Roth

Living in porous, glass houses


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gif by Ordinary Nadee

Privacy is extinct, self-inflicted. Within selfies, tweets, and blog posts, we open the floodgates to our mind.

The internet normalizes exposure. Nothing to hide, we all build glass houses around our lives. Shine the light on us, we declare–pay us with your attention in the currency of likes and shares.

Scroll and refresh, the influencer relishes the spurts of fame, gaining celebrity status behind a wall of edited images that declare their importance.

What is privacy anymore?

Writes Rochelle Gurstein in Self-Invasions and the Invaded Self:

“When the boundary between public and private becomes as extremely porous as it is today, we lose far more than “that kingdom of the mind, that inner world of personal thought and feeling in which every man passes some time,” which would have been disastrous enough.”

An obsession with exposure can get some to the top, making amafessionalism acceptable. No one appears competent to do anything, heart surgery done by a mere Googler.

Mistaking publicity with skill, the deception is our own speed of digestion. It’s too easy to start, to show that we’re all worthy candidates of recognition.

But the skills remain scarce. Talent, built in private, is something to behold in public. Until then, it’s back to the closet.

‘The imperfect match, the failure of unity…’


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The great thing about collage is that, because production is so minimal, you are always close to the vantage point of the viewer. I am often asked why I don’t just get two people, pose them for photographs and splice the shots more accurately, but that misses the point. It’s the imperfect match, the failure of unity, that makes us identify with these beings.

When people say I’m not a real photographer, I tell them I work with the medium rather than in it. In the internet age, it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the producers and the consumers of images. I see my work as merging these two worlds.

John Stezaker, Old Masks

The relationship between the user and product in mind


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“Indifference towards people and the reality in which they live is actually the one and only cardinal sin in design.”

Dieter Rams

Illustrations for Amazon Prime Day


THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. PLEASE SEE THE DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.

Whether’s the art in Apple’s app store or Amazon’s prime day gifs, I continually to be amazed by some of illustrations coming out of the world’s biggest brands.

The ones above appear on Amazon’s giphy channel to help promote Amazon Prime Day, staring next Monday.

If you’re not a Prime member, you can sign up here to get a 30-Day free trial.

Beliefs are fuel


It’s the belief that kills. But a belief can also propel action. In many ways, it is the best medicine in the world, a placebo nocebo.

Without belief, we’d never try. Without belief, we’d never stick to our gut and strike up the confidence to take a risk.

Without some form of fabricated hope, we’d never even start.

“Dream big. Start small. But most of all, start.” — Simon Sinek

Belief is a wonderful exercise in absurdism. No matter how fantastical, our minds can give it life. And we become antifragile.

The reason belief works is because we give it life. Even accidents or failures that reject our beliefs and display our vulnerabilities reroute us into clearer directions.

Beliefs inculcate the feeling of knowing. Whatever we attach to our beliefs, they manifest themselves in real life.

But here’s the thing: we can’t try too hard. Beliefs were never meant to be forced. At the end of the day, all believing is betting.