Pixel art

The facticity of a photo also lies within the pixels themselves, en route to perception. What we see is what we get. #gif #instagram #amwriting

We take pictures with the intention to show someone else — whether it’s our Instagram followers or our friends.

Photos should not be stashed away in the closet or hoarded on the hard drive for safekeeping.

Photography binds us. We communicate in images.

The facticity of a photo also lies within the pixels themselves, en route to perception. What we see is what we get.

Just imagine what it’s like when we learn what to look for.

art by Maximillian Piras 

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Take the information you need and throw it away

In order to be creative, we need curiosity first. #amwriting #gif

There it was, knocking at the door of imagination and begging us to take it for a walk.

The mistake we all make is assuming we have all the information we already need. After all, Google spits up all the answers.

But just because every grade school has an art class doesn’t ensure that the students will be creative.

In order to be creative, we need curiosity first.

When we’re not chasing absolutes, grades, or even the pennies, raw interest accumulates on behalf of what’s alien.

gif via hellotrythis

‘I have the vanity of an artist, I want my work to be seen, but I don’t have to be seen’

“I have the vanity of an artist, I want my work to be seen, but I don’t have to be seen." David Hockney #art #artwork #painting
David Hockney, Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), 1972. Courtesy of Christie’s

“I have the vanity of an artist, I want my work to be seen, but I don’t have to be seen.”

David Hockney

Now the world's most expensive painting by a living artist, David Hockney's Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) sold for $90.3 million from the Christie's auction house.  

‘The idea of painting two figures in different styles appealed so much that I began the painting immediately.’

The language of art

Poems are made of sound. Photos conjure up words. Creators, like linguists, endeavor to translate their work into narratives that make sense.

Artists are storytellers just as much as they are makers. They spend some time consuming content but more time recreating it, recasting their influences, inspirations, and identity into their work.

To be in a spot where curiosity overlaps with the fungi of creativity is the ultimate siren song. With a little effort, art can renew your heart and change your life.

If you too want to make something, don't want another minute. You are the supreme fashion designer of your life.

gif by William Redgrove

When in doubt…

  • Let your art make the rounds. Don’t hide it.
  • Don’t try to be everywhere. Pick a place and be consistent.
  • Rules are recommendations. Feel free to break them, recast, and remix them.
  • Rest when you’re underperforming. Don’t quit.
  • The muse is nonexistent. Inspiration is bunk. Habit is a bicep curl for the brain.

I hope the above helps you push through CRAP (criticism, rejection assholes, pressure). Bonus points for embracing the messy middle

Art via maorisaki

Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro

Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #30: ‘ANTIGUA'
Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #40: ‘THE TOMB'
Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #12: 1979
Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #22: ‘THE FLOOD'
Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #35: ‘PUMPKINS'
Pixel art paintings by Octavi Navarro
SCENE #28: ‘THE ART THIEVES'

In Pixels Huh, I’m mixing my own painting techniques with some of the restrictions of classic pixel art, resulting in very personal scenes that tell unique stories.

Octavi Navarro

Check out the amazing pixel art from Barcelona-based designer Octavi Navarro. 

A guide to art

Art is the ability to get lost and navigate by the gut.

Art is teachable but its answers require no education at all.

Art is the act of perpetual innovation.

Art is expression on canvass, a business product, a speech, and countless other remarkable creations.

Art is controlled randomness, a collection of disparate things.

Art is a messy mastery of movement and environment.

Art is fun, a playful and professional act.

Art is a wave of endless inspiration.

Art is both free and commercial.

Art is deliberate work, sweat and tears. Failure to acceptance is a long process.

Art is ultimately undefinable. But when you see it, you know it.

gif via

They took our jobs 🤖

Hoover catalog in the 1920s.jpg

In the 1920s, Hoover marketed its vacuum not just as a time-saver but as a human energy saver: “Hoover offers the least fatiguing way of cleaning carpets and rugs.”

If a robot wrote this blog post, would you even know the difference?

The future of automation says that robots will displace human jobs. Gmail's auto-responder already responds to email for you.

Writes Logic, a magazine about technology.

Since the dawn of market society, owners and bosses have revelled in telling workers they were replaceable. Robots lend this centuries-old dynamic a troubling new twist: employers threaten employees with the specter of machine competition, shirking responsibility for their avaricious disposition through opportunistic appeals to tech determinism. A “jobless future” is inevitable, we are told, an irresistible outgrowth of innovation, the livelihood-devouring price of progress. (Sadly, the jobless future for the masses doesn’t resemble the jobless present of the 1 percent who live off dividends, interest, and rent, lifting nary a finger as their bank balances grow.)

I doubt the rise of technology obviates the need for human brains and hands. We are thinking machines while the automatons themselves excel in action, at least for the time being.

The bigger problem seems to be the perception of jobs. Most people allow work to justify their existence when really it's the things we do outside the office that should make us feel needed. There's more to life than a paycheck!

South Park they took our jobs.gif

The machines are going to be there like they've been all along, helping people get their work done more efficiently. The bots versus brain chasm is a non-zero-sum game.

But if it just so happens that all we do is push buttons all day, perhaps it'll give us a chance to do other things like making better art.

Wouldn't that be something?

Creativity is a game of inches

It comes as no surprise that bad work begets good work — the more you create, the more you have to play with.

People mistakenly believe that successful artists excelled all along. But what you see as the viewer is mostly the result of trial and error.

What I enjoy about the internet is that you can show your work. Anyone can put their art out into the world and get immediate feedback, even if the latter is crickets. Dead silence may inspire you to be more expressive, in some cases, intensely provocative.

“It is a joy to be hidden, and a disaster not to be found.”– D.W. Winnicott

It takes a lot of time and a ton of practice to recreate what you consider good taste. It also takes a lot of courage to be one of the crazy ones trying something new. But the artist can't combat convention until they master the basics first.

From emulation to originality, the entire creative process seems to happen slowly and shimmers when it thinks you're ready. Until then, cultivating talent is a game of inches.

Doing honest work

You write the story pic / Doing honest work

When it’s all said and done, your satisfaction will depend on your level of completeness.

Should your efforts have skirted the work in any way, incompleteness may leave an indelible stain.

It’s better to surround yourself with honest efforts and avoid being dirty. Only cheaters hide in the soil.

Leonardo’s strange faces

Leonardo da Vinci made ugly beautiful, an approach Francis Bacon did well to mimic nearly five hundred years later.
Leonardo da Vinci made ugly beautiful, an approach Francis Bacon did well to mimic nearly five hundred years later.
Leonardo da Vinci made ugly beautiful, an approach Francis Bacon did well to mimic nearly five hundred years later.
Leonardo da Vinci made ugly beautiful, an approach Francis Bacon did well to mimic nearly five hundred years later.

There's an excellent piece in the NY Times about Leonardo Da Vinci's obsession with drawing weird faces:

Leonardo was a true Renaissance man, fascinated with everything — the mechanics of flight, architecture, engineering, botany, artillery and human anatomy — but one of his favorite private pastimes was to draw faces, either as scribbles in the margins of his notebooks or as fully conceived sketches later used for paintings.

Leonardo da Vinci made ugly beautiful, an approach Francis Bacon did well to mimic nearly five hundred years later.