Sabine Weiss: Observations of French life in the 1950s

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But despite being one of the most distinctive photographers of the 20th century, Weiss insists that she is not an artist. “I am an artisan,” she says. “I don’t create anything: I am just a witness of what I see and what interests me, which has always been human beings.”

Read Sabine Weiss: an accidental tourist at 93

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David Bowie commemorated in Japanese woodblock prints

From Spoon and Tamago:

David Bowie, who passed away in 2016, had a very special connection – some may even call it a “love affair” – with Japan. He originally developed his affinity after taking an interest in Kabuki and was heavily influenced by the exaggerated gestures, costumes and make-up. He later went on to work with fashion designer Kansai Yamamoto on many iconic costumes, as well as with musicians like Tomoyasu Hotei and the filmmaker Nagisa Oshima. In a sense, the love affair has come full circle and now a project has been announced to immortalize David Bowie in the form of ukiyo-e woodblock prints that depict Bowie in elements of kabuki.

(h/t Open Culture)

Georg Scholz’s revenge creativity

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Scholz’ early works were determinedly critical of society. One of them goes back to a painful personal experience, when, on return hungry from the war, he attempted to buy something to eat for himself and his family, only to be pointed by a farmer in the direction of the compost heap. It was this sort of heartless individual to whose meanness the artist erected a lasting monument in his Industrial Farmers of 1920.

(via Darran Anderson)

The father of neuroscience was also an amazing artist

The father of modern neuroscience, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, drew masterful sketches of the brain.

He was an artist trapped in a laboratory.

But where the Renaissance master goes sensual, macro, and dynamic, the Spaniard zeros in, mapping the miraculously microscopic using new methods of staining slide tissues that isolated single cells under the microscope. In this way, Cajal drew the newly visible synaptic networks of the brain and discovered a breakthrough that proved that neurons are in touch without touching. These results changed neuroscience. His work is still widely used as a teaching device.

Read Santiago Ramón y Cajal, a Nobel Laureate in Medicine, Deserves a Place Next to Michelangelo and Leonardo As a Draftsman

Imaginary insects inspired by Star Wars

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Images courtesy Richard Wilkinson

Science-based illustrator Richard Wilkinson mashed together insects into some of the most notable Star Wars characters. Writes Wilkinson on his website:

This project was born out of a fascination with collecting, cataloguing and classifying. It draws inspiration from classic Natural History illustration but explores the subjects that we love to collect and classify from the modern world: Films, TV, Video Games, Comics, Vehicles, Sneakers, Brands etc.

The first book of the series, working title: “Arthropoda Iconicus Volume I: Insects From A Far Away Galaxy”, is a collection of insects that bear a subtle yet uncanny resemblance to characters and vehicles from the worlds favourite space opera.

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Read more about the project in the artist’s interview with Fast Company.

Art as stimuli

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We need art just as we need food. Yes, art is unnecessary. It is “everything you don’t have to do,” as Brian Eno put it. But it’s also the fuel that powers emotions and deeper thinking.

“Music is, to me, proof of the existence of God. It is so extraordinarily full of magic, and in tough times of my life I can listen to music and it makes such a difference.” ― Kurt Vonnegut

Alter an image, modify a sound. It doesn’t matter if the visual or the audible illustrate irreality. For the maker and the viewer, art offers an exit out of happiness.

Inspiration is stimuli

Art helps drive human progress. It is a snapshot in time, illustrating the context and habits of now and yesterday. Cinemagraphs of waves reminds us that water controls the Earth. Images of loose plastic remind us not to dump problems on tomorrow.

Art reminds us to slow down, to compel ourselves to see the beauty of what’s already there. So obsessed with innovation, especially in the chase of ephemeral pixels, it’s easy to forget how we had it before. We must build responsibly.

“Another flaw in human character is that everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance.” – Kurt Vonnegut

Stylization is inessential. But it drives culture. It ensures the durability of both uniqueness and artifice.

RIP Bill Gold, one of the best movie poster artists of all-time

RIP Bill Gold, considered one of the best movie poster artists of all-time. Below are a couple snippets from the obituary in the New York Times but the whole article is worth reading.

Long before poster artists turned to photography and computer-generated images in the 1980s and ’90s, illustrators like Mr. Gold billboarded movies with freehand drawings, based on scripts and first screen prints, that hinted at plots and moods and mysteries, without giving away too much — priming audiences for love, betrayal, jealousy, murder.

“Classic movie posters are memorable; they are held in as much affection as the movies themselves,” Lars Trodson wrote on the film website The Roundtable in 2009. “When a classic movie is matched by a classic poster, you’re held in the thrall of a distinct and pleasurable memory. The poster image becomes part of the movie experience, and is, in the end, another of the reasons why movies are so essential to us.”

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(h/t Little White Lies)

Famous artworks ‘Re-ymagined’ with the people edited out

Re-ymagined, “is an art project that digitally renders the reality of the artists’ environment before they started to draw,” says New York-based artist Yulia Pidlubnyak.

It all started with Van Gogh’s Cafe Terrace, where she redrew the painting with Autodesk 3ds Max but erased the people to elucidate the lighting, framing, and shapes.

Check out her revisions of works from both Grand Wood, Andrew Wyeth, and Edward Hopper below. Pidlubnyak’s rework appears on the left, with the original painting on the right.

(h/t Fast Code Design)