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Books Productivity & Work Quotes

We are ‘brilliant only in tiny bursts’

linchpin“The law of linchpin leverage: The more value you create in your job, the fewer clock minutes of labor you actually spend creating that value. In other words, most of the time, you’re not being brilliant. Most of the time, you do stuff that ordinary people could do.

A brilliant author or businesswoman or senator or software engineer is brilliant only in tiny bursts. The rest of the time, they’re doing work that most any trained person could do.

It might take a lot of tinkering or low-level work or domain knowledge for that brilliance to be evoked, but from the outside, it appears that the art is created in a moment, not in tiny increments.”

— Seth Godin, [easyazon_link identifier=”1591844096″ locale=”US” tag=”wells01-20″]Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?[/easyazon_link]

It often appears that discoveries come out of the blue when in fact, they are the result of consistently doing the work. In other words, big results are the upshot of small things with focus and with care. There is no such thing as overnight success.

Keep dripping.

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Austin Kleon: ‘Be part of the ‘scenius.’

After seeing him speak last week at SXSW, I once again had the pleasure to see author Austin Kleon speak this week at a small get together at Paper’s new offices in TriBeCa.

Below are the key takeaways from his talk:

  • Teach what you learn. Don’t hoard information. Share your education with a colleague or a friend and listen to their perspective too, to gain an even bigger picture. Teaching/learning is a reciprocal process that never ends.
  • Share your work as you make it. Show your imperfections, get the community’s feedback, and tweak the final work.
  • Be part of the ‘scenius.’ Only a few people can be geniuses, i.e. Picasso, Steve Jobs, and Michael Jordan. But the rest of us don’t have to toil in mediocrity. We can collaborate with our niche of influencers who share similar interests and simply recast their ideas, giving them proper attribution along the way.
  • Extend your story. Talking about your work is just as important as doing it. People want to hear how your story came about and what they can do to challenge it or reshape it.

Austin is currently on his book tour for Show Your Work. Catch him at a city near you.

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Get Unstuck: 10 Tips to Unlocking Creativity

I published a new book that I think you’ll like, Get Unstuck: 10 Tips to Unlocking Creativity.

The book is an aggregation of the thoughts you typically see on this blog. Below are the 10 chapters (tips) to unlocking creativity:

  1. Believe That You’re Creative
  2. Do the Opposite
  3. Break Routines
  4. Copy Someone or Something
  5. Combine Ideas
  6. Curate Instead of Create
  7. Go for a Walk
  8. Take Time to Dream
  9. Do It “Now”
  10. Embrace Your Flaws

I hope you’ll support me in downloading this book. I’m happy to send you a PDF version of the book for free if you’ll provide an honest review on the Amazon product page. You can also send me an email or leave your thoughts in the comment section below.

Thanks for your support.

Wells Baum, aka Bombtune

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Einstein was a difficult child (“Little Albert was so different; was there something wrong?”) who “didn’t want to be like the other students.” Instead, he was prone to daydreaming, imagining himself on a beam of light rocketing through space. On A Beam of Light
Einstein was a difficult child (“Little Albert was so different; was there something wrong?”) who “didn’t want to be like the other students.” Instead, he was prone to daydreaming, imagining himself on a beam of light rocketing through space. On A Beam of Light
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On Pragmatism

Pragmatism says that whatever works for you, do it. This can pertain to anything from religion to the way you shoot free throws, as Louis Menand alludes to in his book The Metaphysical Club.

What people often overlook is that pragmatists also believe in evolution. They believe in betterment, receptive to changing their ways to improve the way of life.

Pragmatism, however, is not an excuse to cheat in order to progress although it seems practical if you can get away with it.

Pragmatism still requires the practice of fairness and adheres to the fundamentals laws of society, mostly because these laws simply work. Rules maintain the peace.

Pursuing what works is a simple philosophy that prevents stagnancy. Open-mindedness is ultimate case for self-worth. Learning, loving, having faith, and finding better ways keeps life exciting. In short, pragmatism requires positive, perpetual movement.

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The Great Gatsby Curve
The Great Gatsby Curve