Coles Phillips “fade-away” technique

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The story goes that he developed his “fade-away” technique as a money-saving exercise. Upmarket magazines would typically print covers in full-colour, but Phillips’ style allowed them to print a single or two-colour cover and have their magazine still look great.

Artist Coles Phillips (1880 – 1927)

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Nigeria’s World Cup kits are 🔥

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In an interview with Fader Magazine, Nike FC’s Design Director Pete Hoppins says the Nigeria kit was actually the easiest one to design:

Nigeria was actually the easiest! That’s everyone having fun. We worked closer with the players and the Nigerian federation to make that happen. The hardest were Brazil and England, just like always. It’s got to be a yellow kit and a white kit, respectively. You have to deliver that. Otherwise, you’ll be shot. [laughs] How do you move those forward every two, four years? Especially when you’re trying to innovate the performance. We’re not just going to add things to the kits for the sake of it.

What Nigeria is hopefully going to allow us to do in the future is show that some of the more traditional teams that if you are willing to be creative in the partnership, you can ultimately have something more culturally relevant that connects with the youth.

Read How Nike turned Nigeria’s World Cup kit into a fashion phenomenon

The design of the classroom from 1750 to today






The Design of Childhood: How the Material World Shapes Independent Kids by Alexandra Lange 

The design of the classroom is a technology, and you can interpret that in a lot of different ways. Architects can make that look more, and less, typical. But the point is the instruction, the interaction in the classroom, not that it looks more like a circle or more like a square or whatever else.

(via NPR)

Balenciaga’s $1490 ‘T-Shirt Shirt’ is ugly but awesome

Via @Balenciaga on Instagram
Via @Balenciaga

Luxury fashion house Balenciaga knows how to nail the type of ugly design that gets people talking.

In Fall 2017, it debuted the Bernie Sanders-inspired logo he used for his 2016 campaign. But this time around, the company once referred to as “the master of all” by Christian Dior, will release a double-shirt as part of its Fall 2018 lineup.

Said its creative director Demna Gvasali on the rule-breaking t-shirt shirt:

“I think it’s very interesting, the definition of ugly. I think it’s also very interesting to find this line where ugly becomes beautiful or where beautiful becomes ugly. That’s a challenge I like. I think that’s a part of what fashion stands for and I like that people think my clothes are ugly; I think it’s a compliment.”

Ugly can be beautiful. Prada’s head fashion designer Miuccia Prada agrees: “The investigation of ugliness is, to me, more interesting than the bourgeois idea of beauty. And why? Because ugly is human. It touches the bad and the dirty side of people.”

The rebel in me loves the concept, but not with that hefty price tag.

 

RIP Bill Gold, one of the best movie poster artists of all-time

RIP Bill Gold, considered one of the best movie poster artists of all-time. Below are a couple snippets from the obituary in the New York Times but the whole article is worth reading.

Long before poster artists turned to photography and computer-generated images in the 1980s and ’90s, illustrators like Mr. Gold billboarded movies with freehand drawings, based on scripts and first screen prints, that hinted at plots and moods and mysteries, without giving away too much — priming audiences for love, betrayal, jealousy, murder.

“Classic movie posters are memorable; they are held in as much affection as the movies themselves,” Lars Trodson wrote on the film website The Roundtable in 2009. “When a classic movie is matched by a classic poster, you’re held in the thrall of a distinct and pleasurable memory. The poster image becomes part of the movie experience, and is, in the end, another of the reasons why movies are so essential to us.”

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(h/t Little White Lies)

Tom Wolfe: ‘Logos are strictly a vanity industry’

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In 1972, Tom Wolfe criticized companies for creating logos for no other reason but to look modern:

The abstract total-design logo is the most marvelous fraud that the American graphic arts have ever perpetrated upon American business. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, these abstract logos, which a company (Chase Manhattan, Pan Am, Winston Sprocket, Kor Ban Chemical) is supposed to put on everything from memo pads to the side of its fifty-story building, make absolutely no impact–conscious or unconscious–upon its customers or the general public, except insofar as they create a feeling of vagueness and confusion….Yet millions continue to be poured into the design of them. Why? Because the conversion to a total-design abstract logo format somehow makes it possible for the head of the corporation to tell himself: “I’m modern, up-to-date, a man of the future. I’ve streamlined this old baby.” Why else would they have their companies pour $30,000, $50,000, $100,000 into the concoction of symbols that any student at Pratt could, and would gladly, give him for $125 plus a couple of lunches at the Trattoria, or even the Zum-Zum? The answer: if the fee doesn’t run into five figures, he doesn’t feel streamlined. Logos are strictly a vanity industry, and all who enter the industry should be merciless cynics if they wish to guarantee satisfaction.

To which Mark Wilson at FastCoDesign adds his two cents:

I can’t top Tom Wolfe–but I’d add just two more observations to his own:

1. Paying a Pratt student $35 to make a logo is. . .pretty much what Nike did to create the swoosh in 1971, the year before this criticism was printed. Wolfe surely would not have heard of the tiny Oregon shoe company yet, meaning his criticism was, at least partially, prophetic.

2. You could replace “logo” with almost any overrated trend and “business” with “the American people,” and this whole excerpt still sings. Try “fancy hamburger” or “wide leg pant.” Wolfe makes an almost algebraic argument in this passage that any product that one must rub their chin whilst critiquing is almost surely a fraud.

Of course, logos are ubiquitous. Branding is critical. We think in logos. We associate items with certain brands.

Businesses will hop at any chance to flash their latest logo on stationery, a building, football club jerseys, whatever, to impress. No siren nor Jumpman goes unnoticed.

The H(earring) project turns hearing aids into high-fashion accessories

The H(earring) project turns hearing aids into high-fashion accessories
Image courtesy fanddstudio

Hearing impaired photographer Kate Fichard teamed up with a former design school classmate at the Paris-based F&D studio to create a fashionable hearing aid.

Called the H(earring) project, it just won first prize for accessories at the most prestigious festivals for young designers, The International Festival of Fashion and Photography in Hyères, France. Kudos to the F&D team for injecting some style and design into hearing aids, what some would consider high-fashion.

Go inside the apartment of graphic communicator George Lois

Renowned graphic communicator George Lois takes us on a tour of his apartment. Located in Greenwich Village, what he calls “the best part of Manhattan,” the apartment is full of art. Even the chairs.

'I have chairs all over the house that I don't let anybody sit in. 'Don't sit in that chair!' But it's a chair. No, it's not. It's a work of art.''Click To Tweet

Lois may be most recognized for creating the iconic “I Want My MTV” slogan. But he also designed 92 Esquire covers. He also spearheaded the 1960s Creative Revolution that shaped modern day advertising. Some even think he inspired the attitude of irreverence in Don Draper from Mad Men.

Take it from George Lois: “You have to have the good eye.” There is no doubt the man had a knack for aesthetics.

Millennials are turning their apartments into “house jungles”

Millennials are turning their apartments into “house jungles”

Hilton Carter keeps 180 plants in his house. Apparently, he’s part of a millennial trend that’s obsessed with houseplants.

From The Washington Post:

Others prefer the term “urban rain forest” or the cutesy “jungalow.” In this aspirational landscape, outlandishly and photographically lush is ideal, and filling your home with plants is “urban wilding.” In less enlightened times, we probably would have just called it “decorating.”

The obsession helps generation thumbs bring a little outside, inside.

Writes Tovah Martin, the writer behind houseplant books The Indestructible Houseplant and The Unexpected Houseplant: “One of the first waves of houseplants was after the Industrial Revolution.” The move to cities compelled folks for more greenery, and albeit, oxygen.

“I think the current cycle has a lot to do with people hunkering down. A houseplant is therapeutic. It gives you something to nurture.”

PS. If you want to take care of your own houseplant, Amazon has a whole bunch on sale.

Creative infographics from Pop Chart Lab including a poster of every emoji

From hand-illustrating every emoji ever to showcasing all varieties of beer, a taxonomy of rap names, and a compendium of basketball jerseys, the artists at Pop Chart Lab turns data into creative infographics.

Not surprisingly, the visuals make perfect posters for the wall. You can order a standalone print, pair it with a handmade frame, or request a print mounted on a panel. Check out the Popchart website for more cool prints.  

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Every Emoji Ever
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The Very Many Varieties of Beer
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Grand Taxonomy of Rap Names
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A Visual Compendium of Basketball Jerseys

Craving wilderness/Out to Live

More ‘inspiration boost’ patches from the Asilda Store.

One of the main benefits of walking in nature is that trees inspire feelings of awe./ Craving Wilderness Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Craving Wilderness Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch
Craving Wilderness Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Disconnect and live a little./ Out to Live Glow in the Dark Outdoor Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Out to Live Glow in the Dark Outdoor Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch
Out to Live Glow in the Dark Outdoor Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Questioning the potency of graphic design

With the slogan “Slogans in nice typefaces won’t save the human races,” artist Tim Fishlock AKA Oddly Head sums up the growing powerlessness of the entire field of graphic design. #design #art #poster #banksy #graphic #illustration
Slogans (2017) by Oddly Head (aka Tim Fishlock)

Shepherd Fairey’s iconic “Hope” poster helped electrify the Obama campaign in 2008. Yet, it was Trump’s simplistic “Make America Great Again” red baseball hat that helped spread his message during the 2016 election. The fact that the cap looked undesigned was its greatest asset. Bad design makes an indelible impression too.

Evaluating the impact of graphic design

We are living in a surfeit of graphic design just as we are taking an excess of photos without giving careful attention to them. Writes Edwin Heathcote in the Financial Times:

“When there were fewer images, they could be more memorable. We are now awash with slogans and signs, hashtags and memes so that they burn brightly but fade quickly. Perhaps there can be too much graphic design.”

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Barak Obama Hope Poster by Shepherd Fairey

Like most of the Internet-based content, it gets created, consumed, and then promptly forgotten. With the slogan “Slogans in nice typefaces won’t save the human races,” artist Tim Fishlock AKA Oddly Head sums up the growing powerlessness of the entire field of graphic design. His poster features now at London’s Design Museum’s new show, aptly titled From Hope to Nope.

“We’re living in an epoch of demagoguery and debacle. As a result, there is a process of inner migration, an opting out of reality. As a species, we’re running 21st-century software on hardware that hasn’t been updated for 50,000 years and we’re not coping at all well. Have we ever been so vulnerable and so self-absorbed? Against this backdrop, my work is an investigation but also an admission of my own fallibility.”

There will always be new and old texts to rally around, perhaps none more potent than Britain’s “Keep Calm and Carry On.” But there’s just too much of the fodder in our daily feeds, particularly on visual-first mediums like Instagram and Pinterest. Time will tell if Shepherd Fairey’s gun control posters stick.

Ultimately, the durability of any political art and graffiti rests on the strength of the issue at hand.

Inspiration boost patches: You can’t delegate thinking/Offline is the new luxury

Digging these tech-related ‘inspiration boost’ patches from the Asilda Store.

Never outsource your chance to think (i.e. Google the answers). / You Can’t Delegate Thinking Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Asilda Store You Can't Delegate Thinking Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch #quote #think #clothing #fashion #design #embroidery #inspiration
You Can’t Delegate Thinking Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Never underestimate a good walk in nature. / Offline is The New Luxury Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Asilda Store Offline is The New Luxury Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch #offline #nature #internet #quotes #patch #design #fashion #clothing
Asilda Store Offline is The New Luxury Embroidered Sew or Iron-on Patch

Blasphemy? This artist sets works of art on fire 🔥

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What is new instantly becomes old, a permanent attrition.

At least that’s perspective of artist Maaren Baas, who took a blowtorch to Gerrit Rietveld’s iconic Red and Blue Chair and turned it into something completely new.

“I do not want to destroy, says Baas, “… burning is not something negative. Standstill is. If things remain as is, there is no progress. It’s about changing of what we already know. It’s very human to keep things as they are. While it is very natural to continuously adapt. In nature nothing ever stops changing. It is an ongoing process.”

If a museum is where pieces of art go to congregate in dust, then remixing a version of them at least gives them the potential of new form.

What is great should remain preserved. But it is the pattern of nature’s interest to evolve from past states on top of so-called originality, at least to keep the remix going.

Stagnancy is the work of the devil.