How to avoid the comparison bubble

How to avoid the comparison bubble

[bha size='120×120′ variation='01' align='alignright']It's easy to get caught up in the comparison bubble. You always want what we don't have. You are incorrectly taught to copy, just as you're erroneously taught to think in absolutes.

Celebrate what makes you unique

You should do what makes you unique. You should feel free to steal ideas from other people and build on top of them. Don't just copy-paste.

The worst nightmare will be looking back on your efforts and thinking we you just couldn't be yourself.

Being different, standing out, is what should push you on.

If you need more encouragement:

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You do you

Image via Jerry Kiesewetter


A person can still retain their individuality within a group.

If there are only two parties, two teams, etc., you have to choose the one that comes closest to your beliefs. Choosing sides does not necessitate absolute obedience, nor concede your uniqueness.

When it comes to conformity, there will always be different levels of intensity. People are too complex.

There is little reward for doing what you're told. And there's more to gain from riding the sides.

People on the move

Following others is risky. Just yesterday I saw a man nearly get hit because he decided to follow the woman in front of him who was dashing across the street. At the next light, I saw the same situation, except this time the person following had their head down looking at their phone.

Following others can be both a conscious and automatic decision. You assume that the path in front of you is safe because it’s already been paved by someone else. But the reason God gave us our own set of eyes and brains is to release us from the prison of conformity.

You make your own decisions, what you eat, what you read, what you share online, and where you want to travel. Everything you do is mostly up to you.

Indeed, your individuality can explained in the way you behave at a crosswalk. Will you follow others like a lemming or dictate your own style and pace? When you follow because other people are also going in that direction, you may pose a risk to yourself.

It pays to be different

People complain about athletes, Hollywood actors, and CEOs making a lot of money. But their level of expertise and professionalism are scarce.

You have to have unique skills and meet market demand to get paid big. The majority of us make less because we're replicable and fungible; there's always another person with the same skills. But that doesn't mean the rest of us are just invisible cogs working the system.

Everyone is different. Everyone has one unique skill that no one else has. You may not get paid for it but it makes you stand out from the pack of normals.

Rarely does a unique skill convert into a business opportunity. But that's art, it's always ahead of demand. You shouldn't have to explain your work anyway. The day people get it is the day you give in.

In the meantime, enjoy the freedom to create whatever you want in anonymity. It's the lemmings that are forgotten.

Peer Pressure

First you reject it and then you get ridiculed. Your status as outcast becomes a stigma for all future requests at conformity. Until you stop getting asked to join altogether.

Joining the herd sounds like a wiser idea, a temporary investment to get in the pack while maintaining your individuality, at least in your head.

It takes time to influence other people. Your style is easy to express but hard to duplicate.

The trick to blending in is to stand out even more. If you want that investment you’ll need to play by the rules to get it.

Conformity is a myth. Suck it up at first and then lead by example. The goal isn’t necessary to develop a following; the goal is to be yourself and be appreciated for being different while avoiding full exclusion. The misfits still need to sell themselves.

Cool Kids

“We’ve come too far / To give up who we are” – Pharrell Williams & Daft Punk “Get Lucky”

Unfortunately, some people were never themselves in the beginning. They conformed, bowed down to the herd so they too fit in.

Popularity in high school and college is a game of nothingness. The world demands your uniqueness and creativity, not your ability to blend in like everybody else.

The cool kids are the weird ones. They’re the kids everyone remembers. Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Jack Dorsey were all quirky in the early days. It turns out thinking different is just a stepping stone to innovation.

Never give up your individuality; the worlds looks to you for a sincere contribution.