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Arts

‘Summertime City’ by Kadir Nelson

kadir nelson new yorker cover

This week’s New Yorker cover is a doozy, from no other than artist Kadir Nelson. The magazine interviewed him about the work and why he prefers the slow process of oil painting in the digital age.

I love the oil medium. It’s timeless and has been used for hundreds of years. I want to create artwork that will live outside of the printed medium or the computer. I like to think that I’m creating fine art that happens to work as a cover for The New Yorker.

— Kadir Nelson’s ‘Summertime City’

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Arts Creativity

‘A rejected cartoon isn’t a dead cartoon’: New Yorker cartoonists explain how they come up with ideas

One way to generate good ideas is to produce a lot of bad ones first. Focus on quantity rather than quality so you have a lot to play with.

New Yorker’s cartoon editor Bob Mankoff says coming up with good ideas starts with asking yourself “what if?

‘Ideas breed ideas’..He’s always amazed by the people who tell him they have a single great cartoon idea. One idea is never enough, and it’s rarely good. “The way you get good ideas is to get a lot of ideas,” says Mankoff“

Part of being a creator is learning to cope with failure. Not everyone is going to like your stuff. Mankoff sent the New Yorker thousands of cartoons before the magazine bought one.

No art gets wasted, though. Some cartoonists like Carolita Johnson recycle rejected cartoons. She’s a tweaker, combining ideas to see what else works and then she resubmits. She tries not to overthink it. The New Yorker bought one of her cartoons because it was more clever than funny.

“A rejected cartoon isn’t a dead cartoon.”

Creativity works like a muscle. If you want to strengthen it, you have to practice your craft every day. As Maya Angelou says, “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” Discipline is how cartoonist Matt Diffee skips inspiration and gets to work.

“The idea being blocked is the norm.” To get the juices flowing, he begins his weekly two-hour idea brainstorming sessions with a full pot of coffee and a blank sheet of paper.“As I empty the coffee, I fill up the paper,” he says.

It took Matt thinking over 40 unique concepts before he landed on the one to represent writer’s block.

©MatthewDiffee/The New Yorker Magazine/cartoonbank.com

There are no hacks to the creative process other than putting in the work and learning from your mistakes. The willingness to accept feedback is a lesson in disguise. As an artist, you have to enjoy your craft and be crazy enough to keep going even when no one believes in you.

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Shit just takes time and creative people make time.

Jason Kottke, on redefining his cartoon for the New Yorker
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Hercules
Hercules

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newyorker: A look at this week’s cover, “All Together Now,” by Chris Ware: http://nyr.kr/1gf3JkD But will they actually remember?
newyorker: A look at this week’s cover, “All Together Now,” by Chris Ware: http://nyr.kr/1gf3JkD But will they actually remember?

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“I dropped out of college for this wave.” – William Finnegan

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Acqui-hiring
Acqui-hiring

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“Make it look like a selfie.” Extant narcissists.

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The New Yorker cover, emojified.
The New Yorker cover, emojified.

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The Problem With Multitasking

Today’s machines don’t just allow distraction; they promote it. The Web calls us constantly, like a carnival barker, and the machines, instead of keeping us on task, make it easy to get drawn in—and even add their own distractions to the mix. In short: we have built a generation of “distraction machines” that make great feats of concentrated effort harder instead of easier.

Having a computer in our pocket (our Smartphones) also means we’re a vibrate away from checking when we really don’t need to.