Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London

Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London

3 new vinyls p/mo based on your music tastes 💕, Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London
3 new vinyls p/mo based on your music tastes 💕

Alex Bartsch spent the last ten years photographing the original locations of some of his favorite UK reggae vinyl covers from 1967 to 1987. Holding each sleeve up to arm’s length, he meshes the past and present of London’s surroundings.

While Googling came handy, what he found in his research was that most of the shoots took place outside the record label offices themselves. He told Huck Magazine:

“It often starts with the information on the record sleeve but many of them don’t offer much to go on. I have learned through doing this project that a good place to start is the area where the label was based. Sometimes it was just outside the door of the record label.”

Some of the artists included in his book Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London include Bob Marley & The Wailers, Alton Ellis, Peter Tosh, Delroy Wilson, and more.

Snag a copy on One Love Books here or on Amazon UK.

Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London, peter tosh

Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London

Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London

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Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London

Photographer Alex Bartsch retraces reggae record sleeves in London

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Susan Ressler’s photographs document the absurd corporate life of the 1970s

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Diver © Susan Ressler (1979)

Photographer Susan Ressler released a collection of black and white images capturing the corporate culture of Los Angeles in the 1970s. From the clunky computers to the banal office plant and male-dominated executives, she captures the industrial economy perfectly.

Ressler writes on her website:

Executive Order” depicts corporate America in the late 1970s, mostly in Los Angeles and the Mountain West. The sunbelt was exploding and so was corporate excess. Daylight Books is publishing this work in Spring 2018. Why 40 years later? Because now, in the era of Trump, we face the same dangers that ensue when corporations are deregulated and when profits “trump” people.



Her images are stark reminders of a culture that was and still is prevalent today.

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Newsletter: The art of the wasted day

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Jean-Michel Basquiat

Hi Friends, below are some interesting links I discovered this week. 

Summary: Author Patricia Hampl wants to get rid of the to-do list. Mike Vardy ditches the computer for plain pen and paper to get stuff done. Van Gogh emulated Japanese prints. Video footage of New York City from 1911. Check out all these links and more after the jump. 

Interesting Digs

The Art of the Wasted Day. Patricia Hampl’s new book wants us to reconsider time management by removing the burden of the to-do list and daydream instead. She encourages us, especially in our old age — what she calls the third stage after youth and middle age — to let go of the over-scheduled life.

Why Paper Works. A simple pen and paper ask for our attention. And we give it. Writes Mike Vardy in his piece: “Paper works because it is only limited by what you’re willing to put on (and into) it. Paper provides an escape from your devices and does so without compromising your ability to get things done.”

Van Gogh’s fascination with Japan. Japanese art flooded Western Europe when in 1854, America forced Japan to open its borders to trade. Some of the prints of Japanese woodcuts made it all the way to Vincent Van Gogh in Paris. He grew obsessed with ukyio-e, or “pictures of the world,” joyful elements he copied into his own art.

Thought of the week

“Another flaw in human character is that everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance.”

Kurt Vonnegut


Other Recommendations

Video I

A trip through New York City, 1911In 1911, Swedish film company Svenska Biografteatern recorded its trip to New York. Fortunately, the footage survived and most recently was speed-corrected and reproduced with added street sounds of car horns, horses, and police whistles to give us a sense of the environment back then.

WATCH: A trip through New York City, 1911

Video II

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A monochromatic film by LA-based filmmaker Eliot Lee Hazel, who has also done visual work for Thom York and Beck.

WATCH: Where fashion and architecture meet

Photo

006_World-Press-Photo-of-the-Year-Nominee_Ronaldo-Schemidt-Agence-France-PresseVenezuelan photographer Ronaldo Schemidt won World Press Photo of the Year for his image of the “Burning Man.” The picture shows a fleeing José Víctor Salazar Balza engulfed in flames at an anti-government protest in Venezuela on May 3, 2017.

READ: “Burning Man” wins photo of the year

“Burning Man” wins photo of the year

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© Ronaldo Schemidt, Agence France-Presse

Venezuelan photographer Ronaldo Schemidt won World Press Photo of the Year for his image of the “Burning Man.”

The picture shows a fleeing José Víctor Salazar Balza engulfed in flames at an anti-government protest in Venezuela on May 3, 2017.

“It all took just a few seconds, so I didn’t know what I was shooting,” Schemidt told the British Journal of Photography. “I was moved by instinct, it was very quick. I didn’t stop shooting until I realized what was going on. There was somebody on fire running towards me.”

The photographer currently resides in Mexico where he shoots football matches and more recently covered the Mexico City earthquake aftermath. Check out more images on the Getty website.

 

Newsletter: ‘Beauty is often odd’

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Hiromu Kira, The Thinker (1930) @ The Hollywood Reservoir Dam

Hi Friends, below are some interesting links I stumbled upon this week. 

Summary: Stephen King lists out his top 10 favorite books. Leonardo da Vinci obsessed over water. ‘Zuckerman’ educated the Senate this week on the internet. Ellen Weinstein writes about famous artists and their odd rituals. And the ‘dog photographer’ William Wegman talks about his Weimaraners in human clothesCheck out all the goodies after the jump. 

Interesting Digs

Stephen King lists his top 10 favorite books. Goodreads asked Stephen King to list out his top 10 favorite books of all time. The voracious reader and prolific writer never felt satisfied with his answers but he played along anyway. “Of course, any list like this is slightly ridiculous. On another day, ten different titles might come to mind.”

Leonardo’s Watery Chaos. Leonardo da Vinci obsessed with water more than any of his multidisciplinary interests: architecture, science, painting, and sculpture. The currents represented that perfect chaos that separated air from water.

Maria Popova: I loathe the term “content”.  “I am drawn to ideas that remain resonant across time and space, across cultures and civilizations.” If you read her blog, you know that she excels in digging up little-known gems from primary sources and combining them in an interesting way.

Thought of the week

“I’m just reminding you that excellence is often irrational. Greatness is often strange. Beauty is often odd.”

— Resilience: Hard-Won Wisdom for Living a Better Life (Amazon) by Eric Greitens


Other Recommendations

Book 

51laqwVnjeLCreatives obsess with how other successful creators do their work. Witness the 2013 bestseller Daily Rituals by Mason Currey. But instead of focusing on the productive habits of successful artists, author Ellen Weinstein highlights their oddities.

READ: Good Luck: The Superstitions, Rituals, and Practices of Extraordinary People

Video I

51Srn9qAWFLWilliam Wegman is a photographer famous for his portraits of dogs. For the last 45 years, Wegman has been dressing up his Weimaraners in human clothes and making them do everyday poses.

WATCH: Being Human with the Dog Photographer

Video II

Watch Zuckerberg’s testify live before the Senate right here

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to Capitol Hill to testify before the US Senate. I collected some of the highlights from both days here.

WATCH: Watch Mark Zuckerberg testify live before the Senate right here

 

‘The internet’s ownership of words’

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via @resort

The internet owns our words.

Anyone can pull up an old Tweet or Facebook post and show you ‘this is what you said.’ The internet makes permanent the written word.

But such posts are usually “naked and without context.”

Words get lost in time

It’s not that people don’t look at the time stamp; it’s that words get lost in time. They are instantly indexable. They can be copy-pasted with a click, reemerging from the abyss of dormancy.

Writes Peter Pomerantsev in his article “Pay For Your Words”:

“There is a sense that words have slipped the leash. We think we’re expressing ourselves, but actually we’re just leaving a data imprint for someone else to make use of. Whether we write an email, a Facebook message, store content on a Google drive, or type out a text, all of what we write is sucked into a semantic web.”

But a photo lives and dies from the second it’s taken. It’s born with a frozen setting, a time and a place. Our eyes taste pictures with the past, even before we gaze analyze them.

Pomerantsev continues:

“But you can push away from the photo of yourself: it was a younger you, you look different now. Words are different. They feel ever-present, always as if you’ve just said them. It’s harder to disentangle yourself. ‘You will pay for those words’ goes the banal phrase – no one ever says ‘you will pay for that photo’.”

If we are accountable for what we say, why write anything at all if it comes back to bite you? The durability of the written words appears to be riskier than ever.

The froth is coming off

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With the right instructions, the unfamiliar becomes manageable.

We follow the recipe with the hope that the convoluted reality seeps away into the froth.

Yet, had we followed our instincts we may not have gotten stuck in the first place.

If we don’t take Google Maps with a grain of salt, we will find ourselves submerged under water.

Knowledge is visceral. The rest is streaming.

The Dog Photographer

William Wegman is a photographer famous for his portraits of dogs.

For the last 45 years, Wegman has been dressing up his Weimaraners in human clothes and making them do everyday poses.


“Dogs are always in a state of becoming something: they become characters, objects…when they’re lying down they’re becoming landscapes.”

His dogs have since appeared in children’s books, videos for Sesame Street and an appearance on Saturday Night Live.

Over 300 of his images appeared in William Wegman: Being Human (Amazon link), released last year.

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All images courtesy William Wegman

Newsletter: Aim for the absurd 🤷

Hermit Crab by Aki Inomata 

Hi Friends, below are some of the interesting pieces I discovered this week.

Summary: Recent studies demonstrate that attending live gigs every fortnight help you live longer. Macy’s invented the price tag in the late 1800s! NBC restored rarely seen footage from an interview with Martin Luther King Jr. The world’s greatest athletes perceive pain differently. Check out all the links below!

Interesting Digs

Science says gig-going can help you live longer and increases wellbeing. Attending a gig every two weeks may add a decade to your life. That’s according to a study done by O2 and behavioral science expert Patrick Egen. The study reveals that 20 minutes of seeing live music results in a “21% increase in feelings of wellbeing.” This is higher than both yoga and dog-walking which are also known to uplift mood.

The evolution of the price tag. Can you imagine having to haggle over everything you bought in a store? But as businesses got bigger in the 1870s, shopkeepers needed a way to streamline pricing for both sales clerks and customers alike. Two department stores helped pioneer the price tag: Macy’s in New York and Wanamaker’s in Philadelphia.

Remembering MLK in restored NBC video. “It is cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps…And many Negroes, by the thousands and millions, have been left bootless … as the result of a society that deliberately made his color a stigma…”

Thought of the week

“My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person doing something unfamous. It’s being in the right place at the wrong time.”

Andy Warhol


Other Recommendations

Book

Star Wars Crayola carvings by self-taught artist Hoang Tran

Los Angeles based writer and journalist Eva Katz collected 200 miniature artworks of 24 artists around the globe for her new book Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World.

READ: Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World

Video

Author Malcolm Gladwell sits down with Alex Hutchison, author of the new book Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance to discuss how great athletes come to enjoy suffering pain. Says Hutchison, “Great athletes don’t necessarily feel pain differently. They reframe pain differently.”

WATCH: Explore the Secrets of Human Endurance

Video II

Zeynep Tufekci, Facebook, Cambridge Analytica, We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads

Are we selling our souls for ads? Techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufecki seems to think so. The Cambridge Analytica-Facebook debacle demonstrates the Wild West of data exploitation.

WATCH: We’re building a dystopia just to make people click on ads

 

Newsletter: Awe-struck 👁🌲

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Illustration by Christopher Pearse Cranch for Emerson’s Nature (1836)

Hi Friends, below are some of the pieces I collected and enjoyed this week.

Summary: There’s no denying the positive impact of being surrounded by trees. France passed a law that enforces the right to disconnect. Arnau Alemany paints the most magical photos. Plus, laugh (or cry) at the video about the small annoyances we encounter in life. Check out all the recommendations below.

Interesting Digs

Why Do We Feel Awe? One of the main benefits of walking in nature is that trees inspire feelings of awe. According to research done by psychology professor Dacher Keltner at UC Berkeley, awe benefits not only the mind and body but also improves our social connections and makes us kinder.

The right to disconnect. On January 1st of this year, France passed the ‘right to disconnect‘ law which enforces a digital diet outside working hours. The rule prohibits employers from calling or emailing employees during personal time. France already imposes 35-hour works weeks.

The Art of Procrastination: A Guide to Effective Dawdling, Lollygagging and Postponing. The biggest trick about email is that it gives you the feeling you’ve done something. Every time you open an email, your head lights up like a Christmas tree. What you can do is follow Stanford professor John Perry advice on structure procrastination: “Structured procrastination is the art of making this bad trait work for you. The key idea is that procrastinating does not mean doing absolutely nothing.”

Thought of the week

“When on a roll of any kind, always maintain it as long as possible. Momentum isn’t always easy to conjure.”

Rick Rubin


Other Recommendations

Art

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Simplicity comes from revision. Simplicity retains the essence and deletes the rest. Take a look at the sequence of Picasso’s drawing of a bull. He pairs down the bull from full detail down to its fundamental shape.

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication

Art II

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Catalan artist Arnau Alemany paints obscure urban neighborhoods from Paris, Barcelona, and New York and surrounds them in natural environments. “They exist at the frontier between the metropolis and desert, between the fields and the wastelands, he writes, “Beyond that boundary, there remain only some buildings in clear disrepair.”

See more pictures

Video

toaster #breakfast

Burnt toast, half-torn tape, and uncooperative mobile screen orientations. These are only some of the everyday things that make us frantic with frustration. We can all relate to these small but annoying daily irritations.

WATCH: Life is pain

 

Newsletter: ‘Feel the burn’

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gif by Flo Meije

Hi Friends, the Marines have a saying: ‘pain is weakness leaving the body.’ Read about embracing pain in David Cain’s piece below. In the spirit of ‘everything is a remix,’ check out the amazing animation an artist recreated from the MET. Think robots are a 21st-century creation? Peep the video about François Junod’s work in making automatons. Check out all the digs below.

Interesting Digs

The Art of Enjoying The BurnThe Marines have a saying: ‘pain is weakness leaving the body.’ Progress hurts. But “that intensity can energize the work once you stop seeing it as undesirable,” writes blogger David Cain. Think long-term and embrace the pain.

Banksy returns to New York. The iconic street artist Banksy is back in New York, the first time since his month-long residency back in 2013. He kicked off his visit with a mural dedicated to the imprisonment of Turkish artist and journalist Zehra Dogan, who’s watercolor painting protests the continued destruction of Kurdish territory by the Turkish military.

The Young and Brash of Tech Grow a Bit Older, and Wiser. Tech entrepreneurs are coming to realize their moral responsibility to the addictive tools that they built. Rather ironically, this piece predates the Cambridge Analytica fiasco.

Thought of the week

“Every great advance in knowledge has involved the rejection of authority.”

— Thomas Henry Huxley


Other Recommendations

Art

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Since starting a year ago, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has made 400,000 of its images free to download and remix. The project immediately empowered the likes of software developer and designer Simone Seagle. She downloaded a 1920s print from abstract Russian artist Vasily Kandinsky called Violett.

Art II

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When mixed media artist Jimmy Swift traveled to India in March 2015, he saw a jagged rock on the beach. He immediately knew what to do with it. “When I first saw this rock it looked like a perfect place for a great white. It’s truly amazing how mother nature can carve out such a perfect shape.”

Video

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As craftsman François Junod points out in the video, “the oldest known automatons date back to the Egyptians.” They gained popularity as entertainment for royalty in the 18th century. WATCH: The Magic of Making Machines


Support the blog…

I spend hours each day digging the web for interesting gems and remixing them here. If you enjoy reading wellsbaum.blog, please consider becoming a patron or making a donation. You can also contribute as little as $1 below with just a couple clicks. Thank you.

Make a one-time donation

Contributing to the blog would help me immensely. For every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00

The making of Isle of Dogs + VSCO presets for the film

Twenty-seven animators worked on the new Wes Anderson flick Isle of Dogs. This video demonstrates some of the techniques and challenges they faced in production.

According to one of the creators, “one of the hardest things to do in animation is a walk.” So they strapped cameras to the backs of dogs to understand a canine’s movements and other points of view.  

VSCO releases Isle of Dogs Presets

Photo editing app VSCO released some filters to help promote the movie. I took some photos of my dog and applied the presets.  DOG 2 gives the images a yellow tint while DOG 3 adds a pink hue to images.

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DOG 2 preset
Processed with VSCO with dog3 preset
DOG 3 preset

Newsletter: ‘Life would be tragic if it weren’t funny’

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Image via The Guardian

Hi Friends, we lost the brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking this week but his work and spirit will linger on forever. If you’re stuck in a creative rut, give Seth Godin’s new podcast a listen. For Picasso fans, the Tate Modern has a new exhibit showcasing the artist’s work in his ‘years of wonders.’ Check out all links below.

Interesting Digs

RIP Stephen Hawking: ‘Quiet people have the loudest minds’. Stephen Hawking was a visionary physicist who explored the universe and explained black holes. Born on the 300th anniversary of Galileo’s death, and dying on Einstein’s birthday, the universe teed Hawkings up to be a genius. But he was also a natural comedian, he took life lightly, someone we could all learn the wrinkles from. “Life would be tragic if it weren’t funny,” Hawkings told The New York Times in 2004 interview. He also said that “people who boast about their IQ are losers.”

No such thing (as writer’s block). Writer’s block appears to be the work of the evil. It wants us to quit and hide in shame instead of “dancing with the amygdala” as Seth Godin pleads on the very subject in his new podcast. In reality, no one gets talker’s block just as a plumber never get’s plumber’s block. Stuckness is a work of fiction. Here are my notes.

Study: On Twitter, false news travels faster than true stories. Blame the humans, not the machines. According to research done by data scientists at MIT, it is humans, not bots, which disseminate false news. False news spreads faster than real news because people on Twitter are more likely to retweet novelty.

Thought of the week

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”

— Stephen Hawking


Other Recommendations

Art

picasso #art #artist #painting

Picasso was perhaps best known for his practice of public journaling via painting. “My work is my diary. I have painted my autobiography,” he said. The Tate Modern has a collection of paintings of Picasso’s work through the formative years.

Video

London-based STUDIO AKA animated Icelandic electronica composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s hauntingly beautiful tune ‘A Song For Europa’ from the 2016 album release, Orpheé. WATCH: Jóhann Jóhannsson – A Song For Europa

Tangible

51ba7q+Zk+L._SY355_What people often forget in the age of digitization is that analog — writing your notes down on paper — is more likely to make them stick. Check out the technique of the Scanmarker Air Pen Scanner.


Support the blog…

I spend hours each day digging the web for interesting gems and remixing them here. If you enjoy reading wellsbaum.blog, please consider becoming a patron or making a donation. You can also contribute as little as $1 below with just a couple clicks. Thank you.

Make a one-time donation

Contributing to the blog would help me immensely. For every contributed dollar, I can keep the blog running and continue to provide you interesting links.

$1.00