Tag: society

Culture Life & Philosophy Tech

A mirror on information

gif by Michael Hazani

Journalists focus more on catastrophes than progress. They’re hard-wired to follow tragedy than highlight the good.

Bad news and sensationalism sell eyeballs.

Good news is ephemeral, quickly consumed and forgotten.

When an avalanche of information aligns with a consumption-based based society, all becomes a blur.

Knocked unconscious, we assemble identities that exceed the brain’s three pounds. We validate our preferences by referencing them back to us.

Information is an addictive substance, all too imbued with misunderstanding.

There is no breathe and stop, no detour to detox.

Culture Politics & Society Psychology

The script, the story

How many of us are just acting our way through life, adapting to different settings like chameleons?

Situational elasticity lends its hand to the collaborative truth, that people inject each other with signaling serum. We try to demonstrate to others ‘this is who I am and this what I do.'

All life is a stage, not just the internet, with many reaping the psychological benefits of expectation, even children. Studies show that pretending to be Batman helps kids persevere.

We should follow the route that builds up the most confidence. We just can't expect a return on a relationship should we switch off and reside to impulsiveness.

The edited self is known to slip.

Culture Politics & Society

The bullshit detector

gif via tumblr

You know it when you see it. Bullshit rings like a magic lantern, giving artificiality a spotlight.

More people are susceptible to believing bullshit than ever. Politics is mostly bullshit, as is mass marketing. The irrational tries to take all the mystery out of life.

When storytelling becomes manipulation, people lose their heads. Evil spreads like a fungus, as do the false narratives of a placebo.

The only way to change the reality around you is to call it for what it is: BS! Some will get it; others will need a constant reminder of their blindness.

Life & Philosophy Politics & Society

Why people deny the facts

The partisan brain is real and nonsense. Say and hear anything enough and of course, it’ll feel true. Such mimetic behavior even dupes so-called intellectuals from grasping the reality of the facts. #gif

Everyone gets it.

That rush of blood to the head when something or someone reconfirms your beliefs. You just knew it!

But how often is that perspective the result of wearing blinders?

The partisan brain is real and nonsense. Say and hear anything enough and of course it’ll feel true. Such mimetic behavior even dupes so-called intellectuals from grasping the reality of the facts.

The sidedness has to stop. Remixing and replaying the tribe’s view does little good to resolve the long-term problem, especially when the solution of acceptance is right under their noses.

Culture Politics & Society

Cultivating disparate views

Cultivating disparate views #gif

Two America’s, two different realities. If you can shape your own feeds and build an arsenal of self-confirming information, why do you ever have to see the other side?

But that’s precisely the problem. Inundated with reassurances and accelerated culture, people promptly ignore what they disagree with. Technology is not neutral; instead, it is weaponized to meet group ends.

Democracies thrive in open environments. They need proper dissent and discourse. Above all, a healthy system of government needs a continuity of ideas.

Secondly, democracies need your own thoughts and reflections. If your first opinion is usually someone else’s, the latter should be based on your aggregate experiences and education.

Listen to your views like you listen to your life. Is your interpretation still accurate? Challenge yourself, and read this book for extra credit — you'll thank me later. 

Life & Philosophy

The important stuff is the ordinary stuff

The important stuff is often the ordinary stuff. It’s the small daily actions — like holding the door open for a random stranger or calling your family or friends to catch up — that have a profound impact on your well-being.

Everyone wants to progress. But advancement can be selfish. It gets in the way of the thinking that was already good.

More and more, the cycle of jealousy gets reinforced by outside forces. You always want what you don’t have, the aim of which blinds the pursuit of happiness. 

Do the small things — be kind, maybe a bit selfless — and everything takes care of itself.