‘Men have become the tools of their tools’

via giphy

Technology is not neutral. FANG (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Google) not only want to make all decisions for us, they want us to dissolve into all-consuming bots while the machines do all the thinking and making.

Humans are meant to work, not to be hedonistic jobless throwaways. We seek meaning and identify ourselves through our labor. But our biggest misconception is presuming that the job we don’t like also defines us.

The only benefit to people becoming tools is that they open up the opportunity to do what they’re really meant to do.

‘Try not to get a job.’

The artist Brian Eno advises us to ‘Try not to get a job.’ By not working for cash, we can follow our deepest passions, thereby subverting the Sex and Cash theory that says that we must toil in our office cubicles so we can do what we’re meant to do on the side.

“Men have become the tools of their tools,” quipped Thoreau, who was able to leave his job for Walden’s pond because he enjoyed the relief of a big bank account. As Frank Chimeo tweeted, “Thoreau had enough money to go to Walden Pond because he revolutionized production methods at his father’s pencil factory.”

Undoubtedly, there will also be a concurrent emergence of cyborgs, man blended into machines. The amalgam makes not only a brain without a body, but a machine without a soul. What will doing anything mean a world of automatons, a premonition of programmatic and unthinking disaster?

Read more: Our struggle with Big Tech to protect trust and truth

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Tomorrow’s World: Children in 1966 predict what the world will be like in the year 2000

Well-spoken, cynical, and eerily accurate, in 1966 these kids predicted what life would be like in the year 2000.

Their predictions include:

  • The rise of robots and job loss due to automation
  • The threat of nuclear war
  • Globalization and the destruction of cultures (note: they couldn’t have foreseen the backlash)
  • Population and overcrowding
  • Genetically modified foods
  • Sea level rise. Warns one child: “The oceans will wise and cover England.”

Little did they know the internet would further complicate things.

It’s your turn. What will life be like in the year 2050?

Drone to the rescue

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via Little Ripper

Lifeguards deployed a drone to save two struggling teenage swimmers stranded in rough seas off the coast of Australia.

This is apparently the first time drone technology carrying a flotation device has rescued swimmers.

While drones are commonly known for selfies (i.e. dronies), Amazon deliveries, firing missiles, and spying but they can also do some good too. The company behind the technology, Little Ripper, developed the drones to monitor sharks for coastal safety.

The drone also recorded the entire event which you can see below.


Are we still alive?


Somewhere upon the way of evolution, humans lucked out. We developed language. We had hands that allowed us to manipulate our environment.

A bigger brain doesn’t make you smarter or more conscious. Neanderthals had larger brains than humans, so too do dolphins and whales. But the former died off, and the latter remain confined to water.

Meanwhile, humans built intricate tools. Says American neuroscientist Christof Koch, “human civilization is all about tools, whether it’s a little stone, an arrow, a bomb, or a computer.”

Given the advancements in technology and artificial intelligence, we may be too smart for our own good. By developing tools to think and for us, we’re outsourcing our neurons and developing a kind of robotic consciousness.

Humans are turning into broken machines.

Our jobs make us feel important and shape our identity. What are people going to do when they no longer have to work and have bundles of free time? Most of us will procrastinate and lounge while others will want to play like children with crayons again.

My now is your now 


Humans are entropic; we die the minute we’re born. Our lives are limited by time.

But life goes on. It keeps ticking away.

NASA discovered seven Earth-like planets that no one reading this will ever see.

Machines are starting to take over jobs,; the AI revolution will do everything from making music to curating it.

We discover and tee up the future even if we don’t breathe in it.

Our presence comes and goes in the blink of the eye. Time passing is time past. It’s always about more than us.

The stimulation of chaos


Everything binds to each other. It all bleeds and blends. Like interconnected dots, blood coagulates to scab a wound. We stem the flow. Throw on a band-aid. Put a damn up. Anything to thwart the chaos of nature.

Within a controlled environment, we manufacture new freedoms. We the protect the fragility of intention the best we can. But algae grows, and it doesn’t want to move. We max out progress, assuming modernity is the acme of our potential. Indifference morphs into stagnancy and then a reignited desire for chaos.

Pushing onward is a mindset. When the thinking stops, and people resurrect the instincts of past, dipping their toes into the end of history. Time heals all wounds until the default setting becomes stale once again. “We are now condemned to live in exciting times,” writes author Shadi Hamid. How quickly we forget what was worth preserving.

Debating the nature of time 

The future already happened. We are just working backwards to fulfill an eventuality. But some physicists are leaning toward a philosophical route to explain the meaning of time. Instead of longing on the future, they focus on the present. 

“The future is not now real and there can be no definite facts of the matter about the future.” What is real is “the process by which future events are generated out of present events.” – Lee Smolin, Theoretical Physicist

Is the “NOW,” space, time all there is? As they say, let go and let God.

“Future events exist, she said, they just don’t exist now. “The block universe is not a changing picture. It’s a picture of change.” Things happen when they happen”  – Jenann Ismael, Philosopher University of Arizona

Forward Thinking

Guessing the future is easier than writing it. Steve Job did both. He knew what people wanted and built it for them.

Most people are either one of the other: analyst/forecaster or developer. The analysts’ information generally direct the developers what to do, mostly because the developers just want to do the work. They want to think in code. But you can’t waste a developer’s time building something outdated.

Research and development flock together, ideally as one, where forward thinking meets predictive doing.

Google’s new car contains only a panic button, no brakes nor a steering wheel. And a touch of uber. The car would be summoned with a smartphone application. It would pick up a passenger and automatically drive to a destination selected on a smartphone app without any human intervention.
Google’s new car contains only a panic button, no brakes nor a steering wheel. And a touch of uber. The car would be summoned with a smartphone application. It would pick up a passenger and automatically drive to a destination selected on a smartphone app without any human intervention.

Life is what you choose

Where you go depends on how you handle the variables you’ve been given.

Some of us start lucky and end up there. Some of us start with roadblocks and end up successful. Some of us can’t seem to crack the plight from birth while some of us (re: over-achievers) always want more.

No matter where you are in your life, there’s no turning back. Everything is about right now and thinking a few steps ahead. Perspective is king.

Opportunistic Myopia

Opportunities are everywhere, so you build up for them in preparation for the strike.

But in preparing for the ‘next thing’ you forget about right now, in this space and time.

How do you appreciate the present without getting obsessed with the future?

Self-service is obvious and ugly. It’s not all about you, it’s about the team you’re trying to help. The endeavor is a cohesive one rather than an individual one.

Sometimes great leadership requires selfishness. Someone’s got to lead the comeback or attempt that game-winning shot. But most of the time, your work requires that it help others too, and not just yourself.

Get active

via giphy

When you become bored or disinterested, do something hard. Get comfortable with the unknown and the fear of failing.

Look back at everything you’ve achieved to date. Most of it came through hard work and a little bit of risk.

Now, look into the future. The same formula of diligence and audacity is the only way you’ll get closer to what you want.

Routines signal change. The only way to propel change is to take action. Your hesitation is another person’s gain.

tomorrow is risky, frightening and in some way represents one step closer to the end. But it also brings with it the possibility of better and the chance to do something that matters. – Seth Godin

Get active.