The sound of the future

First came the radio, then television, and now the pocket-sized smartphone. Each iteration seemed to enhance our addiction to glow. #gif
via giphy

We used to drive horses, then cabs, and now Uber. Ideas, hardly new, get retranslated to match the demands of modern times.

First came the radio, then television, and now the pocket-sized smartphone. Each iteration seemed to enhance our addiction to glow.

From snail mail to email, to instant messaging — this time is different they say, confusing progress with advancement.

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Hearts manipulated at scale

Hearts manipulated at scale. It's as if social media is a new religion. The double-tap ❤️ permeates everything, so much so we stopped going on vacation for pleasure and instead with a desire to accumulate likes. #socialmedia #addiction #technoloy #gif #iphone

Hearts manipulated at scale. It's as if social media is the new religion. The double-tap ❤️ permeates everything, so much so we stopped going on vacation for pleasure and instead with desire to accumulate likes.

Studies show that if your phone is in your field of vision you won't be able to resist it. Do you think you can go without your phone a whole minute? No way! Not if it's within reach.  

Over stimulation is an impediment to insight. Self-knowledge and new ideas percolate in disconnection. Yet it pains people even a minute to sit with their own thoughts.

The tug of war between consciousness and screen addiction is real. The lite brite is there to kill different avenues of thought. Fidget spinners are just sops. Give you mind permission to dodge the hook. 

Art by @annasalmi

Tumblr to ban “adult content” creators

Tumblr to ban "adult content" creators #art #tumblr
Tumblr to ban "adult content" creators #art #tumblr

I'm not surprised Apple banned Tumblr from its App Store for supporting a bunch of porn. But I am surprised Tumblr will ban the entire “adult content” category on December 17 so you won't see some of the more risque artsy images. Most creators will be hoping that the social network — driven primarily by advertising dollars — will continue to support creative expression.

As David Bowie once alluded to, the internet thrives and perhaps decays in the gray area

Art by hadar_pinchon & phoenix 

Angels with dirty faces

If you want to be more optimistic, close your Twitter account. Bad news is addicting. But don’t completely bury your head in the sand. #amwriting

If you want to be more optimistic, close your Twitter account. Bad news is addicting. But don’t completely bury your head in the sand.

No one acts in public like they do on social media. People say whatever they want online because they’re shielded behind a mobile screen.

Go to the grocery and the sick-spitting Twitter weirdo behind you is just another dad buying cereal for his kids.

The internet and reality are two-faced. The shift from avatar to face is terribly inconsistent. The silent truth is to acknowledge the web’s nastiness without dancing to its thoughts.

In other words, don’t take the tweets so seriously.

Hobbying for hobbies sake

Whether it’s trying surfing or playing the guitar when’s the last time you did something out of pure joy?

In this Instagram-edited era where everyone gets their own stage, people only like to do things they’re good at. The thought goes: ‘if I can’t share it and show my best self, why do it?’

The aim for perfection limits the urge to enjoy hobbies for hobbies sake. As the author Tim Wu notes:

“But there’s a deeper reason, I’ve come to think, that so many people don’t have hobbies: We’re afraid of being bad at them. Or rather, we are intimidated by the expectation — itself a hallmark of our intensely public, performative age — that we must actually be skilled at what we do in our free time.”

The comedian never knows how their material will reciprocate until they get on stage and try their material. The jazz musician tweaks their tempo to test audience reaction. The writer publishes a first chapter of the book for feedback. In terms of professional life, showing your work is critical. But as a hobbyist, you don’t need reassurance. Again, writes Wu:

“Lost here is the gentle pursuit of a modest competence, the doing of something just because you enjoy it, not because you are good at it.”

Playing is natural, reception is artificial. It is hobbies that feed the soul with pure goodness. Showcasing the hobby is not necessary, but if so, neither is acing it.

Hobbies shouldn't feel like work. They are a process to enjoy.

“The physical universe is basically playful. There is no necessity for it whatsoever. It isn’t going anywhere. It doesn’t have a destination that it ought to arrive at. But it is best understood by its analogy to music. Because music as an art form is essentially playful. We say you play the piano, you don’t work the piano.”

Alan Watts

Hashtag heaven

Luxury today and tomorrow will be defined by the ability to disconnect, to live a secret life where there’s no need to stay constantly connected for the sole purpose of a future job or fear of missing out.

Social media is a poor insurance policy. Except disconnecting is not the goal — moderation is.

An excess of anything will make you sick, your eyes roll and stomach turn. The culprits: beer, candy, coffee, tv, and screen opiates.

Drunk and unconscious, the dopamine on loop — you aren't meant to pursue hedonism all the time. You need time to restore some willpower.

The connective power of the internet is uncanny. Mobile tech is too good to be true. But we don’t need to be a millionaire to stem its negative impact.

The key to unlocking hashtag heaven is to take a deliberate break every once in a while. Leave your phone behind or you'll unconsciously use it.

Instead, grab a leash and take your thoughts for a walk. That's wellness that works.

The sharing virus

The biggest threat to a virus is its own exhaustion. It wants to be said, repeated, and spread until it cements into a meme.

Words, ideas, and apps are all types of viruses. Pretty much anything that spreads. Most are benign of course but perhaps none is more pervasive and self-inflicted than the sickness of self-promotion.

The social media age is plagued with envy, where everyone tries to one-up each other with their next best post. The cycle of jealousy shatters reality into shards of half-truths.

The sharing virus constricts people to a 1080 x 1080 square. Meanwhile, portrait mode constrains satisfaction. Spiraling into overextension, overworked trends and habits start to leak.

We like to think we're dabbling in the next niche before the entire market even knows it.

Four to one

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The goal is to be good at more than one thing. Everyone should be versatile.

But sometimes it is better to narrow yourself to expand. Instead of doing everything, you focus on doing one thing well. And the rest gets better as a result.

Take social networking for example. It's a misperception that one has to be on all networks, sharing all the time. So you take shortcuts. After publishing a new blog post, you automatically share it on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Tumblr, and Google+.

Frictionless broadcasting may work for those who already have an acquired audience. But for the startup or entrepreneur — they will need to work harder to get attention. And the best way to do that is to pick one network and double-down.

Focusing on Twitter, for instance, may allow you to write concise tweets, insert captivating media, and include vanity links. Focusing on Instagram may allow you to include the niche hashtags related to the post that gives the image an extra boost.

Single-tasking on one marketing channel takes a strategy. Publishing is deliberate and methodical, the community engagement well-intentioned.

Less is more. The pattern of interactions will bleed into other outlets. Unlike the feather, you'll be the wind directing all the controls.

Hopelessly absorbed

We photograph everything and observe nothing. We consume the Instagram feed, and then feel inadequate for doing so.

Human behavior is predictable, robotic. Acknowledging peak screen further cements a broken will — even the most mindful urge won't let us put our devices down.

We've officially extended digital into our cells, with the reality forthcoming. From the iWatch to iSkin, the future is implanted. From neuron to neuron, we'll check email and change the tv channel with the flick of a thought.

Digital succeeds in numbing the pain, without aknowledging what's going in our own heart.

Mind over matter, what's the matter with our mind?

Loop your best pins with Tailwind’s new SmartLoop feature

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. PLEASE SEE THE DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.

Loop your best pins with Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature

If you want to stay active on Pinterest with minimal effort, you'll need to start using Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature.

As an active Tailwind user and affiliate, I had the pleasure to get a sneak peek at the new software last week before it was officially released in beta.

Disclosure: I’m a Tailwind affiliate and will make a small referral fee if you use my link.

What is SmartLoop?

SmartLoop takes content you've previously pinned and puts those pins back into the most relevant boards at the best times for engagement. This way, you can maximize your best-performing evergreen pins without having to track their last pin date in an Excel doc and manually reschedule them again.

Why loop your pins

Looping your top pins helps is one of the easiest ways to stay active on Pinterest without spamming the feeds with the same, repetitive content too often. Tailwind worked directly with Pinterest to develop healthy ways to reshare your content without looking like a bot. Pinterest has banned similar looping services like Boardbooster due to improper pinning practices. So rest-assure: Tailwind is 100% Pinterest-approved partner. 

Set-it-and-forget-it. My favorite part about SmartLoop is the seasonal pinning feature where you can set a start and stop time for a collection of pins. You can set up a loop for the holidays for instance, and start pinning your own content to gift boards, party ideas, and more.

You can also set up loops to go more niche and focus on trends related to custom bikes, wrap dresses or jumpsuits. Remember to keep up with the Pinterest business blog for more on trends and business insight.

You're going to save so much time with SmartLoop so you can focus on creating new content and optimizing all your social media strategies. 

How to set up SmartLoop and automate your pinning

  1. Set up a loop and pick a loop type

As mentioned above, decide whether you want to create an evergreen or seasonal campaign.  Keep in mind that evergreen loops will reshare your pins indefinitely all year round. This is also a great time to think about creating loops specific to group boards, even ones with strict rules. Later on, you can set up Board Rules so you never have to worry about excess pinning.  

2. Select the pins you want to loop

After creating your loop and selecting which boards to pin to, you'll go ahead and select the pins you'll want to loop. I recommend selecting the ones with the most clicks (see your Pinterest data) so you can optimize clicks to your site but you can also select the ones with the most saves, as recommended by Tailwind.

Loop your best pins with Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature

3. Decide on the frequency for pinning 

At the next step, you'll choose the frequency of pinning. Core content will be pins you'd like to pin to at least 1x/day, Niche content will be those pins that will publish 4x/week. 

Loop your best pins with Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature

4. Specify board rules

As mentioned earlier, you'll have the option to set board rules to abide by the best group practices for particular boards. Just note that these rules are separate than any pins you've scheduled for your queue or interval pinning.

Loop your best pins with Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature

After you set up your loops, you'll be able to manage of all them and make edits in the main SmartLoop dashboard. This is where you'll find loop and pin performance as well in case you want to add new top performers and delete underperforming ones.

If you want a complete video tutorial on mastering SmartLoop, watch the below video from Tailwind. 

Using SmartLoop will save you both time and headspace so you can focus on other parts of your business while also allowing time to create new pins. You'll also make more money.

How much does SmartLoop cost?

In terms of costs, note that you always get up 100 pins free with setting up your Tailwind. But if you're already a Plus Plan member, you get 250 looped pins at no cost to you. Below is the pricing for SmartLoop power-ups.

Loop your best pins with Tailwind's new SmartLoop feature

For a more detailed view on SmartLoop pricing, see below. 

SmartLoop Pricing including a limited time 50% Private Beta discount
Paid AnnuallyPaid Monthly# SmartLoop Posts
FreeFree250
$5/mo$7.50/mo1000
$10/mo$15/mo2500
$15/mo$22.50/moUnlimited

Tailwind Blog Content about SmartLoop

When sharing is not so self-caring

Social media is a world where everyone tries to out self-promote each other and in doing so, stretch their lives further from reality.

Even the destinations — whether it be a restaurant, hotel resort, or kayaking trip — want to make their experiences more Instagrammable.

Sharing has commoditized life, turning us into an avalanche of rotating ads, blurring the lines between paid and organic. Every post is an ad in some way, shape, or form. Like TV, we start to develop an imaginary relationship with those on screen, doubtful we'd ever met in real life.

The blizzard of images droughts perception with seeing. We feel envious of those in our feed before we know why we may feel so. The contagion of jealousy spreads like a virus. The upshot is a homogenization of lives and content.

We all want what we don't have. Social media generates a false narrative of unnecessary desire. Instagrams are just pictures on a wall, temporarily surfing over the hopes and fears in our genes. It feels good lying stuck in the ludic loop.

But irreality is ephemeral. The long-term narrative eventually wakes us up to the fact that we're barking up the wrong tree. Life is here and now, attracting itself and trying to love you back.

Stand out of our light

stand out of our light.jpg

Huxley predicted that the deliberate flood of information, perhaps a more lethal strategy than Orwellian censorship, would dent our interest in reading books, having active opinions, and therefore make us passive.

The internet, of course, puts information distribution on hyper-speed, skipping from one issue to the next. People consume and quickly forget what's important, all the while externalizing everything onto the screen. We have lost our ability to pay attention, not just because of tweeting politicians but because of screaming merchants.

There's yet another book dissecting this very topic of how technology hijacks the brain. Author James Williams of Stand out of our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy writes: 

“The liberation of human attention may be the defining moral and political struggle of our time. We therefore have an obligation to rewire this system of intelligent, adversarial persuasion before it rewires us.”

The former Google strategist has witnessed the intentional creation of distractive technologies that overpower human will so we no longer “want what we want to want.”

The Financial Times book review writes:

In an attempt to invent new linguistic concepts, the author plays with three types of attentional light: spotlight, starlight and daylight, pertaining to doing, being and knowing.

In this respect, Williams admires the free-speaking Greek philosopher Diogenes. One day, while sunning himself in Corinth, he was visited by Alexander the Great, who promised to grant him any wish. The cranky Diogenes replied: “Stand out of my light!” Williams wants a handful of West Coast tech executives to stop blocking out our human light, too.

Perhaps if we regain our detachment from irreality we'll be able to look back and pinpoint attention distortion with fresh eyes.

Twitter = High School

giphy
via giphy

The impulsiveness, the cliques, the gossip, and the ego — the Twitter cesspool can be fun, entertaining, and darn-right toxic.

Unlike Instagram, Twitter brings out the worst in people through the abuse of words. In short, it is ‘The High School We Can’t Log Off From.' Writes New York Times columnist Jennifer Senior:

A few years back, the sociologist Robert Faris described high school to me as “a large box of strangers.” The kids don’t necessarily share much in common, after all; they just happen to be the same age and live in the same place. So what do they do in this giant box to give it order, structure? They divide into tribes and resort to aggression to determine status.

The same can be said of Twitter. It’s the ultimate large box of strangers. As in high school, Twitter denizens divide into tribes and bully to gain status; as in high school, too-confessional musings and dumb mistakes turn up in the wrong hands and end in humiliation.

Unlike Apple, Facebook, Google, and Pinterest, Twitter bucked the Silicon Valley trend and kept Alex Jones's account live. Twitter thrives on breaking news and its divisiveness.

Clay Shirky, one of the shrewdest internet theorists around, has noted that the faster the medium is, the more emotional it gets. Twitter, as we know, is pretty fast, and therefore runs pretty hot.

Yet despite all the negativity, Twitter may be the world's most important social network even if it's the least profitable. And while some of its users abuse the public microphone, others use it just to talk, teach, and share their work for the benefit of others.