What introverts do at parties

What introverts do at parties, from the book No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotion at Work

If you read Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, you'd realize introversion is not a disease nor does it make poor leaders. The opposite is true. Introverts are often more sociable in intimate settings although they like to “recharge at parties,” with a preference on listening, thinking, and acting dutifully as well rather than squander people's time with bombast.

We perceive talkers as smarter than quiet types—even though grade-point averages and SAT and intelligence test scores reveal this perception to be inaccurate.

Susain Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

There's even no use in separating the introvert versus the extrovert. Most people are ambiverts anyway, toggling between reservation and vocal expression the same way people vacillate between left and right brain hemispheres. The dual characteristics make us whole.

PS. If you're looking to break free of all the sidedness of what type of behavior is right or wrong, learn how to embrace your emotions at work. This book may show you how.

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Published by Wells Baum

A daily blogger who connects the dots between arts and life.